The Best Gaming Monitors (2022 Reviews)

We've spent countless hours researching and testing to present the absolute best gaming monitors that you can buy this year. We're always updating this ultimate guide.

Need a new gaming monitor? Well, you’ve come to the right place!

Here, you’ll find only the best gaming monitor deals currently available as well as all the information you’ll need to make sure you’re getting the perfect monitor for you.

TypeMonitorSizeResolutionPanelRefresh
Rate
VRR 
Best 1080p Gaming Monitors24”1920x1080IPS144HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Stable)
25”1920x1080IPS240HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Compatible)
24”1920x1080IPS240HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Stable)
25”1920x1080IPS390HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Stable)
Best 1440p Gaming Monitors27”
32”
2560x1440VA165HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Unstable)
27”2560x1440IPS170HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Stable)
32”2560x1440IPS170HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Compatible)
27”
32”
2560x1440VA240HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Compatible)
27”2560x1440IPS240HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Stable)
32”2560x1440IPS260HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Compatible)
27”2560x1440IPS360HzG-SYNC
Best UltraWide Gaming Monitors30”2560x1080IPS200HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Compatible)
34”3440x1440VA144HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Unstable)
34”3440x1440IPS144HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Compatible)
34”3440x1440IPS144HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Stable)
38”3840x1600IPS144HzG-SYNC Ultimate + FreeSync
49”5120x1440VA240HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Compatible)
Best 4K Gaming Monitors28”3840x2160IPS60HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Stable)
28”3840x2160IPS144HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Stable)
32”3840x2160IPS160HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Compatible)
43”3840x2160VA144HzFreeSync
Best HDR Gaming Monitors48”3840x2160OLED120HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Compatible)
42”3840x2160OLED120HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Compatible)
42”3840x2160OLED138HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Compatible)
34"3440x1440QD-OLED165HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC
Stable)
49"5120x1440VA240HzFreeSync
32"3840x2160VA165HzFreeSync
27"2560x1440IPS165HzFreeSync
27"3840x2160IPS160HzFreeSync
*Recommended monitor - a review section will be added soon
budget pick

LG 24GN600

LG 24GN600 Monitor
  • Accurate and consistent colors
  • Quick response time
  • FreeSync and MBR up to 144Hz
best value

Acer XV272UV

Acer XV272UV
  • Accurate, consistent, and vibrant colors
  • Quick response time
  • FreeSync and MBR up to 170Hz
premium pick

Dell AW3423DWF

Dell AW3423DWF Monitor
  • Infinite contrast ratio, high peak brightness
  • VRR up to 165Hz
  • Instantaneous response time

As you can see, there are plenty of gaming monitors to choose from.

We’ve selected the best models for every possible combination of display specifications in order to provide you with a diverse selection.

While we’ve picked the best monitors for each category, be sure to check the ‘Alternatives’ section of each review below.

Depending on region and availability, the alternate display might suit you better. We’ll also mention if there are any upcoming and/or similar displays to keep in mind.

Be sure to read the reviews below to familiarize yourself with what panel typeresolutionrefresh rate and other features (such as HDR and VRR) best suit your preference, budget and PC rig or console. Also, feel free to leave us a comment below if you’re on the fence between two or more gaming monitors!

If you want to view our changelogs for this particular buying guide, you can do so at the end of this article.

Table of ContentsShow

Best 1080p Gaming Monitors

The 1920×1080 or 1080p resolution is the least demanding on your CPU and GPU, allowing you to maintain a high frame rate more easily. Whether you need a good budget 1080p gaming monitor or the absolute best one, we’ve got you covered!

The Pros:

  • Accurate and consistent colors
  • Wide viewing angles
  • Quick response time
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync and MBR up to 144Hz

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The LG 24GN600 is our top-recommended 1080p 144Hz gaming monitor – here’s why!

Image Quality

Besides not being demanding, another good thing about 1080p resolution is that it looks good on ~24″ sized screens. On the 23.8″ viewable screen of the LG 24GN600, you get a decent pixel density of 92.56 PPI (pixels per inch).

As a result, you get a decent amount of screen space and fairly sharp details and text. The same resolution on a 27″ monitor, for instance, would look considerably more pixelated, though some users wouldn’t mind it.

The LG 24GN600 is based on an IPS panel that boasts ~99% sRGB gamut for accurate and rich colors and 178° wide viewing angles which ensure that the image remains perfect regardless of the angle you’re looking at it.

Next, it has a peak brightness of 300-nits, meaning that it can get more than bright enough even in bright rooms.

The contrast ratio amounts to 1,000:1, which is standard for IPS panel monitors. So, blacks won’t be quite as deep as that of VA panels (with a ~3,000:1 contrast ratio). It’s mainly in dark rooms that blacks appear a bit grayish in comparison to VA panels, but the image is still quite vibrant overall. Besides, VA panels have flaws of their own.

IPS monitors are also affected by IPS glow, but its severity varies across different units of monitors, and it’s usually manageable.

Features

amd freesync logo

The LG 24GN600 has a fast 1ms GtG pixel response time speed for no visible trailing behind fast-moving objects – ideal for first-person shooters.

AMD FreeSync is supported with a 48-144Hz VRR range for tear-free gameplay up to 144FPS, and the ‘G-SYNC Compatible’ mode works flawlessly with GeForce cards, even though the monitor is not certified by NVIDIA.

In contrast, VA panel monitors at this price range have significantly slower response time speed, resulting in noticeable smearing in fast-paced games. Moreover, most units are affected by VRR brightness flickering.

The LG 24GN600 also supports Motion Blur Reduction; this technology uses backlight strobing to reduce perceived motion blur at a cost of picture brightness.

Other features include various picture presets and Black Equalizer (improves visibility in darker scenes).

Visit our LG 24GN650/600 review for more information. The monitor also supports the 1080p 120Hz mode on both the PS5 and the Xbox One/Series X/S consoles.

Design & Connectivity

LG 24GN600 Monitor Design

The monitor has a tilt-only stand, but it’s VESA mount compatible via the 100x100mm pattern. There’s the 24GN650 version with an ergonomic stand, but it can be up to $100 more expensive depending on the sale.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.4, a USB port for firmware updates and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

  • LG 24GN650 – the same monitor, but with an ergonomic stand
  • AOC 24G2 – offers a wider color gamut, but not quite as fast response time speed
  • HP x24i, x24ih – based on the same panel as the LG 24GN600, offers basically identical image quality and performance with a different design and feature set

We recommend these 24″ 1080p 144Hz IPS monitors if you can find them for ~$180. In the $220 – $250 price range, you can actually find 25″ 1080p 240Hz IPS models, which we’ll get into next.

The Pros:

  • Accurate and consistent colors
  • Wide viewing angles
  • Quick response time
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync up to 240Hz
  • Fully ergonomic stand

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The Dell S2522HG is one of the best 240Hz gaming monitors with an IPS panel; it offers stunning motion clarity and responsiveness as well as gorgeous colors and wide viewing angles!

Image Quality

Based on an IPS panel with a 400-nit peak brightness, a 1,000:1 static contrast ratio, and ~99% sRGB color gamut, the Dell S2522HG provides you with vivid and striking colors!

Now, the previously-mentioned LG 24GN600 offers a similar viewing experience, so the only reason to get the S2522HG is obviously for the higher refresh rate.

Keep in mind that in order to take advantage of 240Hz, you also need adequately high frame rates. Ideally, you’ll want at least 240FPS, but you’ll need over 144FPS to justify buying a higher refresh rate display since 144FPS will look basically the same at 144Hz and 240Hz.

It’s also worth noting that the difference between 144Hz and 240Hz is not nearly as big as the difference between 60Hz and 144Hz. You can still feel it and you do get lower input lag, which will certainly appeal to serious competitive gamers eager to improve.

The best part is that it can be found for $220 – $250, which is as much as you would pay for some 1080p 144Hz IPS models!

Features

Further, the Dell S2522HG supports AMD FreeSync with a 48-240Hz VRR range, and NVIDIA certified it as G-SYNC compatible.

Other features include Dark Stabilizer and various picture presets.

Design & Connectivity

Dell S2522HG Monitor Design

The design of the monitor is also exceptional with full ergonomic support including up to 130mm height adjustment, -5°/21° tilt, 90° pivot, +/- 45° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, a single DisplayPort 1.2 socket, a headphone jack and a quad-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

We only recommend the Dell S2522HG if you can find it at its promotional price of $250, that is, if you have a limited budget and don’t care about MBR.

Otherwise, we recommend the below-mentioned ViewSonic XG2431 with impeccable MBR or the Acer XV252QF with 390Hz, both of which can be found for ~$300.

If you have a budget of ~$250, want a 240Hz monitor but the S2522HG isn’t available at that price, your only choice is the LG 27GP750 (or the older 27GN750) 27″ 1080p 240Hz 1ms IPS model, which can sometimes be found on sale for $230.

The Pros:

  • Accurate and consistent colors
  • Wide viewing angles
  • Quick response time
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync up to 240Hz
  • Best MBR implementation
  • Fully ergonomic stand

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

If you want CRT-like motion clarity, we highly recommend the ViewSonic XG2431 due to its impeccable MBR implementation with Blur Busters Approved 2.0 certification.

Image Quality

The ViewSonic XG2431 offers similar image quality to that of the Dell S2522HG. It’s based on a 23.8″ panel, so the screen is slightly smaller and you get a bit higher pixel density, though the difference is subtle.

Other specifications are basically identical and include a 350-nit peak brightness, a 1,000:1 contrast ratio, 8-bit color depth support with full sRGB gamut coverage, 178° wide viewing angles and a quick 1ms GtG pixel response time speed.

Features

The monitor supports AMD FreeSync with a 48-240Hz VRR range and VRR works without issues with NVIDIA cards.

What makes the ViewSonic XG2431 exceptional is its PureXP+ backlight strobing technology that offers amazing performance with basically no strobe crosstalk or other visual artifacts. It also offers plenty of well-optimized presets for strobing at different refresh rates and brightness levels, as well as advanced customization.

Check out our ViewSonic XG2431 review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

ViewSonic XG2431 Monitor Design

The stand is robust and offers a good range of ergonomics, including up to 120mm height adjustment, -5°/15° tilt, 90° pivot, +/- 90° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.4, a headphone jack, two 3W built-in speakers and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

The Pros:

  • Accurate and consistent colors
  • Wide viewing angles
  • Quick response time
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync and MBR up to 390Hz
  • Fully ergonomic stand

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

Want an even higher refresh rate? Check out the Acer Nitro XV252QF, a 360Hz gaming monitor that’s overclockable to 390Hz!

Image Quality

Now, as you might’ve expected, the jump to 390Hz from 240Hz won’t be as noticeable as the jump to 240Hz from 144Hz, but the difference between 144Hz and 390Hz is big!

So, if you already have a 240Hz display, the Acer XV252QF won’t exactly provide you with a significantly smoother experience.

What’s the bottom line? The difference between 240Hz and 360Hz (or 390Hz) is there, and experienced players will certainly notice and feel it.

So, if you’re one of those competitive gamers where every millisecond counts, you will want 360Hz — granted that your PC can output as many FPS.

As for the image quality, the monitor is based on a 24.5″ IPS panel with 400-nit peak brightness, a 1,000:1 contrast ratio and ~99% sRGB color gamut, so you’re getting the same viewing experience as with the previously mentioned S2522HG 240Hz IPS model.

Features

The Acer XV252QF supports AMD FreeSync for tear-free gameplay up to 390FPS. It also supports backlight strobing up to 390Hz, but it’s not as optimized as that of the XG2431. Basically, with the XV252QF you get power input lag, while the XG2431 offers better motion clarity.

Other features include custom crosshairs and timers, various pre-calibrated picture presets, and Black Boost for better visibility in dark scenes of games.

Design & Connectivity

Acer XV252QF Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is quite ergonomic with up to 120mm height adjustment, -5°/25° tilt, +/- 180° swivel, 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 (limited to 240Hz) inputs, a headphone jack and dual 2W built-in speakers.

Alternatives

  • Acer Aopen 25XV2QF – the same monitor, but with different branding
  • Dell AW2521H – a 25″ 1080p 360Hz 1ms IPS gaming monitor based on the same panel, but with a dedicated G-SYNC module. However, it’s not overclockable and its MBR implementation is limited to 240Hz

Note that there are also 500Hz gaming monitors announced. These will certainly be more expensive and there’s no word on a release date yet.

Best 1440p Gaming Monitors

For most people, 1440p resolution and at least a 144Hz refresh rate is the perfect combination. You get a crisp and sharp image quality as well as a responsive gaming experience since 1440p is not nearly as taxing on your GPU as 4K UHD.

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio
  • High pixel density (27-inch model)
  • Wide color gamut
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync and MBR up to 165Hz
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Ghosting in fast-paced games, mainly in darker scenes
  • Some units prone to VRR brightness flickering

About The Monitor

The Gigabyte G27QCA and G32QCA are 1440p 165Hz gaming monitors with curved VA panels for a more immersive gaming experience, but a weaker performance when it comes to fast-paced gaming.

Image Quality

The main difference between the two is obviously the screen size and therefore pixel density. The G27QC-A has 108 PPI, whereas the G32QC-A has 93 PPI.

So, the picture will be sharper on the 27″ model, but the overall viewing experience is more immersive on the 32″ version due to the larger screen. Some users find 32″ monitors to be too big for desktop use though.

The 32″ model can also get brighter with a 350-nit peak brightness (400-nits for HDR), while the 27″ variant is rated at 250-nits, but can get a bit over 300-nits, depending on the unit.

With both monitors, you get a high contrast ratio (3,000:1) and a wide ~90% DCI-P3 color gamut, which along with the curved screen, greatly improves the visual aspect of the gaming experience.

However, the monitors have a slower response time speed, resulting in more noticeable ghosting and trailing in fast-paced games, mainly in darker scenes.

The monitors are equipped with the Aim Stabilizer MBR technology, which can remove ghosting to an extent, but the 1ms (GtG) response time of fast TN and IPS panels still provides better performance in fast-paced games.

All in all, if you aren’t all that into competitive gaming and would instead get better visuals, the Gigabyte G27QC A and G32QC A are for you.

Don’t worry, you’ll still be able to enjoy single-player and casual multiplayer first-person shooters – unless you’re particularly sensitive to ghosting.

Features

Moving on, AMD FreeSync is supported with a 48-165Hz VRR range and it works with compatible NVIDIA cards. Alas, some units suffer from the FreeSync brightness flickering issue.

Other features include various pre-calibrated picture presets, crosshair overlays, Black Equalizer, and Dashboard (tracks PC system performance on-screen, such as CPU and GPU temperature, utilization, etc.).

For more information, check out our Gigabyte G27QC and G32QC reviews (same monitors as the G27QCA and G32QCA variants.

Design & Connectivity

gigabyte g27qc back

Both monitors offer height adjustment (up to 130mm for the 27″ model, and up to 100mm for the 32″ version), tilt by -5°/20°, and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

They both have a screen curvature of 1500R, but the curve is more noticeable on the G32QC due to its larger size.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.2, a headphone jack, and a dual-USB 3.0 hub, while the G27QC also has dual 2W integrated speakers.

Alternatives

In the past, we were much more inclined to recommend 1440p 144Hz VA gaming monitors as budget options. Nowadays, you can find affordable IPS models too, such as the Acer XV272UV – it doesn’t have as high contrast ratio, but you won’t get any dark smearing or VRR brightness flickering.

So, consider the G27QCA only if you don’t mind ghosting and screen tearing since you’ll have to disable VRR if you get a unit that’s prone to brightness flickering.

Buying the Gigabyte G32QCA makes more sense. At ~$300, it’s only slightly more expensive than the 27″ variant – and if you want a 32″ 1440p 144Hz monitor with an IPS panel, you’ll have to invest at least $400. More information about the best 1440p 144Hz IPS monitors and alternatives below.

If you’re looking for a flat-screen 32″ 1440p 165Hz VA gaming monitor, check out the LG 32GN650. There’s also the newer version of the G32QCA with a built-in KVM switch, the Gigabyte M32QC.

The Pros:

  • Wide color gamut
  • High pixel density
  • Quick response time
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync and MBR up to 170Hz
  • Ergonomic stand

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The Acer XV272UV is the cheapest 1440p 165Hz (170Hz factory OC) IPS gaming monitor with a 1ms GtG response time speed, allowing you to enjoy fast-paced games with zero ghosting and no VRR brightness flickering.

Image Quality

Thanks to its IPS panel with a wide 95% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage, the Acer XV272UV delivers consistent and rich colors.

Other panel-related specifications include a 400-nit peak brightness and a 1,000:1 static contrast ratio.

Features

The monitor has both AMD FreeSync Premium and stable G-SYNC Compatible performance for tear-free gameplay up to 170FPS. It also supports backlight strobing.

Other features include Black Boost (improves visibility in dark scenes), crosshair overlays and various picture presets.

Visit our Acer XV272UV review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Acer XV272UV Review

The stand offers full ergonomic support with up to 110mm height adjustment, -5°/25° tilt, 90° pivot, +/- 180° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.2, a headphone jack and dual 2W integrated speakers.

Alternatives

All of the above-mentioned 27″ 1440p 144Hz+ IPS gaming monitors offer similar image quality, performance and features. We find that the XV272UV offers the best value for money though.

The Pros:

  • Accurate and consistent colors
  • Wide color gamut
  • Quick response time
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync and MBR up to 170Hz
  • Ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

Looking for a 32″ 1440p gaming monitor with an IPS panel and a high refresh rate? The Gigabyte M32Q offers the best value for money by far!

Image Quality

A 32″ 1440p monitor doesn’t have as high pixel density as a 27″ model, so the image quality won’t be quite as crisp (you get the same PPI as that of a 24″ 1080p monitor).

However, the larger screen does offer a more immersive viewing and gaming experience.

Further, the M32Q has a wide 94% DCI-P3 gamut coverage for vibrant colors (sRGB emulation mode is available as well), while the contrast ratio and peak brightness are standard at 1,000:1 and 400-nits, respectively.

Features

Moving on, the monitor has a rapid 1ms GtG pixel response time speed, so there’s no noticeable ghosting in fast-paced games.

AMD FreeSync is supported with a 48-170Hz VRR range and even though the monitor is not officially certified as G-SYNC Compatible by NVIDIA, it works without any issues.

Other features include Black Equalizer, crosshair overlays, various picture modes and Aim Stabilizer Sync MBR technology that can work at the same time as VRR.

Visit our Gigabyte M32Q review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Gigabyte M32Q Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and fairly ergonomic with height adjustment up to 130mm, +/- 30° swivel, -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.2, two HDMI 2.0 ports, a headphone jack, a USB 3.0 hub (1 upstream + 3 downstream), USB-C (DP Alt Mode) and a built-in KVM switch.

Alternatives

If you’re looking for a better 32″ 1440p 165Hz IPS gaming monitor, check out the ASUS PG329Q with a wider 99% Adobe RGB color gamut and DisplayHDR 600, though it goes for $200 – $300 more.

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio, wide color gamut
  • High pixel density (27-inch model)
  • DisplayHDR 600
  • Quick response time
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync and MBR up to 240Hz
  • Fully ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • 1000R curvature too steep for some users
  • VRR Control option might cause micro-stuttering on some units

About The Monitor

The Samsung C27G75T and the Samsung C32G75T are the only widescreen VA-panel gaming monitors with a fast 1ms GtG response time speed!

Image Quality

The Samsung Odyssey G7 monitors allow you to enjoy both a high 2,500:1 contrast ratio for deep blacks without IPS glow and a fast response time speed for no ghosting in fast-paced games!

On top of that, they boast a high 240Hz refresh rate, a wide 95% DCI-P3 color gamut, and DisplayHDR 600 certification.

Unlike the previously mentioned monitors with HDR support, the Samsung G7 monitors actually offer a meaningful improvement in HDR picture quality.

To start with, they have a good 2,500:1 native contrast ratio and wide color gamut, while their typical 350-nit peak brightness gets a boost up to 600-nits for more vivid highlights. Moreover, there are 8 dimming zones that can dim parts of the screen for an improved HDR viewing experience.

Of course, since there are only 8 dimming zones, you won’t be getting the ‘true’ HDR viewing experience, but the HDR picture is still great considering the price.

Features

The Samsung Odyssey G7 monitors feature NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatible certification, and they offer smooth VRR performance as long as you have the 1009.3 firmware (or newer) installed.

FreeSync Premium Pro is supported as well with AMD cards, providing lower input lag and better HDR picture quality in compatible games.

The VRR range is 60-240Hz for the 27″ model and 80-240Hz for the 32″ variant, while HDMI is limited to 48-144Hz.

The mentioned firmware update introduces a new ‘VRR Control’ option that, once enabled, prevents the brightness flickering usually associated with VA panels.

However, some users report that micro-stuttering occurs when VRR Control is enabled. It doesn’t seem to affect all units and its intensity varies across different panels, some users might not even notice it.

So, if you want guaranteed flawless VRR performance, IPS is still the way to go, but most gamers will be happy with the Odyssey G7.

Other features include MBR, Black Equalizer, crosshair overlays and various picture presets.

Design & Connectivity

samsung c32g75t monitor

The design includes a sturdy stand with a good range of ergonomics including up to 120mm height adjustment, 90° pivot, +/- 15° swivel, -9°/13° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

At the back and the front of the monitor, there are RGB LEDs that you can customize in the OSD menu.

As for connectivity options, there are two DisplayPort 1.4 sockets, a single HDMI 2.0 port which maxes out at 1440p 144Hz, a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Keep in mind that for 1440p 240Hz and 10-bit color, you’ll need a graphics card that supports DSC (Display Stream Compression). These include AMD’s RX 5xxx series and NVIDIA’s RTX 20-series and GTX 16-series (or newer). With older cards, you’re limited to 1440p 240Hz 8-bit color or 1440p 144Hz 10-bit color.

The monitors have a steep 1000R screen curvature, which is more pronounced on the 32″ version. Some users love the deep curvature, others despise it. It’s a matter of preference. Also, some can get used to it over time, and some cannot.

The Pros:

  • Accurate and consistent colors
  • Wide Adobe RGB color gamut
  • High pixel density
  • Quick response time
  • Height-adjustable stand, USB hub
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync and MBR up to 240Hz

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)
  • Design lacks swivel/pivot option

About The Monitor

Would you rather have a flat-screen 1440p 240Hz gaming monitor?

Check out the Gigabyte M27Q-X with a wide Adobe RGB gamut and smooth G-SYNC performance.

Image Quality

The M27Q-X uses an IPS panel with 178° wide viewing angles and consistent colors. It has a wide 97% Adobe RGB color gamut (~140% sRGB) and comes with a ~100% sRGB emulation mode.

Now, the M27Q-X monitor has a lower contrast ratio than the G7, so you won’t get as deep blacks, but the colors are more vivid and rich.

The HDR picture is also a step down due to the lower 400-nit peak brightness and lack of local dimming.

So, the main advantage of the M27QX over the G7 is the more vibrant and precise color reproduction, wider viewing angles, impeccable VRR performance, and the fact that most people prefer flat displays at this screen size.

Features

The monitor supports VRR up to 240FPS for tear-free gameplay. FreeSync works with NVIDIA cards without any issues.

Other gaming features include Black Equalizer, a refresh rate tracker, crosshair overlays, various picture presets and the Aim Stabilizer-Sync backlight strobing technology.

Check out our Gigabyte M27Q-X review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Acer Aopen 25XV2QF Monitor Design

The monitor has a sturdy and height-adjustable stand (up to 130mm) with tilt (-5°/20°) and VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 inputs, two HDMI 2.0 ports, USB-C (DP Alt Mode, 18W PD), a headphone jack, dual 2W built-in speakers and a dual-USB 3.0 hub. It also has a KVM switch and support for PiP/PbP.

The Pros:

  • Accurate and consistent colors
  • Wide DCI-P3 color gamut
  • Quick response time
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync up to 260Hz

The Cons:

  • Design lacks swivel option
  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology, but A-TW polarizer helps minimize the issue)

About The Monitor

Want a 32″ 1440p 240Hz IPS gaming monitor? The LG 32GQ850 is the best option currently available yet it costs the same as the inferior alternatives.

Image Quality

The UltraGear 32GQ850 has a wide 98% DCI-P3 color gamut as well as an sRGB emulation mode for vibrant and accurate colors.

Further, it has VESA’s DisplayHDR 600 certification. So, with HDR content, you get a boost in peak brightness up to 600-nits and there are 16 dimming zones that can improve the 1,000:1 static contrast ratio a bit, depending on the scene.

Features

VRR is supported with both AMD’s FreeSync Premium and NVIDIA’s G-SYNC Compatible certification within the 48-240Hz range. You can also overclock the monitor up to 260Hz!

Other features include Black Stabilizer, hardware calibration, crosshair overlays and various picture presets.

Check out our LG 32GQ850 review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

LG UltraGear 32GQ850 Review

The stand is robust and offers a good range of ergonomics including up to 110mm height adjustment, -5°/15° tilt, 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.1 inputs, a headphone jack (with DTS HP:X) and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Best UltraWide Gaming Monitors

Ultrawide monitors provide you with a wider field of view which greatly increases both productivity and gaming immersion.

Make sure your favorite games support the 21:9 aspect ratio format though. Otherwise, you’ll have to play with black borders (pillarbox) or with a stretched-out picture.

Note that we have a dedicated buying guide for the best ultrawide monitors.

The Pros:

  • Accurate and consistent colors
  • Quick response time
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync and MBR up to 200Hz
  • UltraWide aspect ratio for added immersion
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The MSI MAG301RF is one of the most affordable ultrawide gaming monitors yet it’s equipped with a high 200Hz refresh rate and a rapid 1ms GtG response time speed!

Image Quality

This 30″ (29.5″ viewable) ultrawide monitor is essentially as tall as a regular 24″ monitor, just ~33% wider. The pixel density is also similar at 94 PPI.

Most competitive FPS gamers prefer ~24″ sized screens as it allows them to view all the action at once – without having to move their eyes/head as much as they would on a larger monitor.

The MSI MAG301RF basically just extends that 24″ screen horizontally for a wider field of view, allowing you to spot the enemies coming from the left or right corners more quickly. Indeed, it’s a competitive edge, which is why some titles don’t support the 21:9 aspect ratio, such as Overwatch, StarCraft, and Valorant. Most games support it though.

On top of that, you get the 2560×1080 resolution which looks great on a 30″ display but is not very demanding, allowing you to maintain a high frame rate and take advantage of the monitor’s 200Hz refresh rate while the 1ms GtG response time speed efficiently removes ghosting behind fast-moving objects.

It’s has a peak brightness of 300-nits, a static contrast ratio of 1,000:1, and slightly saturated colors with 105% sRGB gamut.

Features

Moving on, the MSI MAG301RF supports AMD FreeSync up to 200Hz and it’s certified as G-SYNC Compatible by NVIDIA.

Other features include Night Vision (improves visibility in dark scenes of games), Mystic Light RGB LED at the rear of the monitor, various picture presets, MPRT backlight strobing, a refresh rate tracker, on-screen timers, and crosshair overlays.

Design & Connectivity

MSI MAG301RF Monitor Design

You can elevate the screen of the monitor up to 130mm, tilt it by -5°/20°, swivel by +/- 45°, or VESA mount it via the 100x100mm pattern.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.2, two HDMI 2.0 ports, a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

  • Sceptre C305B-200UN – A 30″ 2560×1080 200Hz ultrawide gaming monitor based on a curved VA panel. It has a higher contrast ratio, but a much slower response time speed.

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio and pixel density
  • Wide color gamut
  • UltraWide format for added immersion
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync and MBR up to 144Hz
  • Ergonomic stand

The Cons:

  • Ghosting in fast-paced games, mainly in darker scenes
  • Some units prone to VRR brightness flickering

About the Monitor

The Gigabyte G34WQC-A is the best ultrawide gaming monitor under $450.

In fact, the G34WQC-A is actually cheaper than any 3440×1440 60Hz-75Hz ultrawide IPS model, yet it offers a more immersive picture quality and a more responsive gaming experience, just not as consistent colors or as fast response time.

Image Quality

Based on a VA panel with a 4,000:1 contrast ratio, a 400-nit peak brightness, 10-bit color depth with 125% sRGB color gamut and 3440×1440 resolution, the monitor delivers a crystal-clear picture quality with deep blacks and vibrant colors.

As if that’s not enough, you hit the pixel density sweet spot of roughly 110 PPI, which results in plenty of screen space available and maximum detail clarity without any scaling necessary.

The main downside of this monitor, as it’s the case with most VA models, is the response time speed. In fast-paced games, there’s noticeable trailing of fast-moving objects, which gets more apparent in darker scenes. To most gamers, it won’t be game-breaking, but if you’re sensitive to ghosting, you’ll prefer an IPS ultrawide monitor.

Features

The Gigabyte G34WQC-A supports AMD FreeSync with a 48-144Hz VRR range.

However, many units of the monitor have brightness flickering issues when FreeSync is enabled. Other units, on the other hand, work without any issues, so your mileage may vary.

If you do get a monitor with flickering issues, there are a few ways to reduce it. For instance, you can decrease the VRR range using CRU.

Even if you get a unit that flickers, it won’t necessarily flicker in all video games. So, you can just disable FreeSync or use MBR (Aim Stabilizer) in games where flickering occurs.

Other features of the monitor include the standard game-enhancing tools such as Black Equalizer, Color Vibrance, various picture presets and crosshair overlays.

Design & Connectivity

Gigabyte G34WQC A Monitor Design

The Gigabyte G34WQC-A has a steep 1500R screen curvature which along with the ultrawide resolution further improves the viewing experience.

Further, the design is height-adjustable by up to 100mm and you can tilt the screen by -5°/23° or VESA mount it via the 100x100mm pattern.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, two DisplayPort 1.4 sockets, a headphone jack and two 2W built-in speakers. Note that HDMI 2.0 maxes out at 100Hz at 3440×1440.

Alternatives

The Pros:

  • Accurate and consistent colors
  • UltraWide format for added immersion, wide color gamut
  • Quick response time
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync and MBR up to 160Hz
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)
  • Design lacks swivel option

About The Monitor

The LG 34GP83A is the most cost-efficient 3440×1440 IPS ultrawide monitor with a native 144Hz refresh rate currently available!

Image Quality

Based on LG’s Nano IPS technology, the LG 34GP83A pushes its color gamut to 98% DCI-P3 (135% sRGB native, with an sRGB clamp available) and adds support for entry-level HDR (VESA DisplayHDR 400 standard) with up to 400-nit peak brightness.

The monitor will provide you with just a glimpse of what HDR can actually do; even though the display offers a wide color gamut, it still lacks brightness and contrast ratio for an HDR viewing experience worthy of attention.

Regardless of its trivial HDR support, the LG 34GP83A still delivers an outstanding picture quality thanks to its accurate, consistent and vibrant colors, as well as the high resolution.

Features

The LG 34GP83A supports AMD FreeSync with a 48-144Hz VRR range, and NVIDIA certified it as G-SYNC Compatible. You can even overclock the monitor up to 160Hz if you drop the color depth to 8-bit from 10-bit.

The biggest advantage this monitor has over the older IPS ultrawide displays near this price range is the fast 1ms GtG response time speed, which eliminates all prominent ghosting without adding any pixel overshoot.

Standard LG features such as Black Stabilizer, D.A.S., crosshairs and picture presets are available as well.

Design & Connectivity

lg 34gp83a monitor design

You can elevate the screen of the monitor by up to 110mm and tilt it by -5°/15° – or mount it using the VESA pattern, but you cannot swivel or pivot the screen. The monitor has a 1900R curvature for added immersion.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports (max 85Hz at 3440×1440), a dual-USB 3.0 hub and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

Note that there’s also the LG 34GN850, which is the same monitor, so get whichever is available/cheaper at the time of buying.

The Pros:

  • Accurate and consistent colors
  • UltraWide format for added immersion, wide color gamut
  • Quick response time
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync and MBR up to 144Hz
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)
  • Screen is flat, not curved

About The Monitor

If you’d like a cheaper 34″ 3440×1440 144Hz IPS ultrawide gaming monitor, we recommend the Gigabyte M34WQ.

Image Quality

The main downside of the M34WQ in comparison to the LG 34GP83A is that it has a flat screen, but it’s also up to ~$300 cheaper.

While most users prefer curved screens at this form factor due to the width of the display, a flat 34″ screen still offers immersive image quality, you’ll just have to sit a fit further from the screen for the optimal viewing experience.

The Gigabyte M34WQ has a wide 91% DCI-P3 color gamut, a strong 400-nit peak brightness, a 1,000:1 contrast ratio and wide 178° viewing angles.

Features

AMD FreeSync is supported with a 48-144Hz range for tear-free gameplay, and it works without issues with compatible NVIDIA graphics cards.

MBR is available as well, and it can even work at the same time as VRR. Other features include Black Equalizer, PiP/PbP, crosshair overlays and various picture presets.

All in all, if you want a 34″ 3440×1440 144Hz ultrawide gaming monitor below $500, but don’t want to deal with dark level smearing or VRR brightness flickering associated with VA panels, the M34WQ is for you. Check out our M34WQ review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Gigabyte M34WQ Design

You can elevate the screen by up to 130mm, tilt by -5°/21°, +/- 30° swivel or VESA mount it via the 100x100mm pattern.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports, a USB-C port (DP 1.4 Alt Mode, 18W PD), a headphone jack, a dual-USB 3.0 hub, an integrated KVM switch and dual 3W built-in speakers.

Alternatives

If you want something similar but cheaper, check out the Sceptre E345W-QUT with a 34″ 3440×1440 flat-screen IPS panel with an sRGB color gamut and 100Hz.

The Pros:

  • Accurate and consistent colors
  • DisplayHDR 600
  • UltraWide format for added immersion, wide color gamut
  • Quick response time
  • Plenty of features, including G-SYNC up to 144Hz
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)
  • No sRGB emulation mode

About The Monitor

The Dell Alienware AW3821DW is essentially a beefed-up version of the LG 34GP83A.

Image Quality

You get a larger 38″ screen with a higher 3840×1600 screen resolution to back it up, thus providing you with the same ideal ~110 PPI pixel density.

The Dell AW3821DW has a Nano IPS panel with a wide 95% DCI-P3 color gamut and a fast 1ms GtG response time speed. Sadly, it doesn’t have an sRGB emulation mode.

Additionally, it offers VESA DisplayHDR 600 support with a peak brightness of 600-nits and 32 local dimming zones for an excellent HDR viewing experience.

Features

The Dell AW3821DW features a dedicated G-SYNC module that ensures flawless VRR performance up to 144FPS. You can also use VRR with AMD cards over DisplayPort.

Other features include various picture presets, a refresh rate tracker, on-screen timers, Dark Stabilizer, and RGB lighting at the rear of the monitor.

For more information, be sure to check out our Dell AW3821DW review.

Design & Connectivity

Dell Alienware AW3821DW Monitor Design

Moving on, the design of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 130mm, swivel by +/- 20°, VESA mount compatibility and -5°/15° screen tilt.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports, a headphone jack, an audio line-out port and a quad-USB 3.0 hub.

Due to DP 1.4 limitation and lack of DSC support, you will need to lower the color depth to 8-bit for 144Hz. For 10-bit color, you need to lower the refresh rate to 120Hz.

Given that the difference between 8-bit and 10-bit is subtle, just like the difference between 120Hz and 144Hz, this isn’t a big issue. Also, note that HDMI 2.0 maxes out at 85Hz at 3840×1600.

Alternatives

  • Acer X38P, LG 38GL950G – Based on the same panel with 175Hz OC and sRGB mode, but weaker DisplayHDR 400 support
  • LG 38GN950, LG 38WN95C – Based on the same panel with 160Hz OC, sRGB mode, and DisplayHDR 600 (12 dimming zones), but no G-SYNC module

At its usual $1,425 price, the Dell AW3821DW offers the best value for money among these ultrawide monitors. Since the prices of all models fluctuate, feel free to leave us a comment below if you’re unsure which one to buy.

In case you’d like a big ultrawide monitor, but can’t afford any of these 38″ models, there’s the Innocn 40C1R with a 40″ ultrawide panel albeit with a 3440×1440 resolution. It still has decent 93 PPI as well as 144Hz, VRR, wide color gamut and USB-C with 90W PD.

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio, wide color gamut
  • High pixel density
  • DisplayHDR 1000
  • Quick response time
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync up to 240Hz
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Only 10 dimming zones
  • Some overshoot at 220 – 240FPS when VRR is enabled

About The Monitor

Interested in something a bit different? The Samsung G9 is a 49″ 32:9 5120×1440 ‘super’ ultrawide gaming monitor!

Essentially, it’s equivalent to two 27″ 1440p monitors put side by side, just without the gap in-between — but the Samsung C49G95T has more tricks up its sleeve!

Image Quality

The Samsung Odyssey G9 has a VA panel that boasts a superior contrast ratio of 2,500:1. It also uses the quantum dot technology (QLED) to further increase its color gamut to 125% sRGB (95% DCI-P3).

But it gets better: it has a peak luminance of stunning 1000-nits, which in addition to its high contrast and wide color gamut, earned the monitor VESA’s DisplayHDR 1000 certification. So, there’s a notable enhancement in image quality for HDR content.

Unlike most monitors with direct-lit LED backlights, the backlight of the G9 is edge-lit. This allows the monitor to be so slim and light despite its enormous size.

Moreover, it has a 10-zone local dimming system, which further improves the contrast ratio as parts of the screen that need to be dark can be dimmed locally, instead of having to dim the entire screen. 

Of course, the local dimming is not as effective as that of the more expensive FALD (full-array local dimming) models which have 384 dimming zones or more, but these models are also far more costly, we’ll get into them later on.

All in all, the Samsung C49G95T offers an incredibly immersive picture quality thanks to its HDR support with excellent contrast, brightness and color gamut performance while AMD FreeSync Premium Pro (with G-SYNC Compatibility), 1ms GtG response time, and the 240Hz refresh rate ensure a smooth and fluid performance.

Features

FreeSync works with NVIDIA cards and it’s certified as G-SYNC Compatible with a 60-240Hz VRR range.

When using VRR, there can be some noticeable overshoot above ~220FPS, however, you can ‘fix’ this if the inverse ghosting becomes too apparent to you by simply capping your frame rate to 220FPS, which you most likely won’t even reach at 5120×1440.

Note that in order to get 240Hz at 5120×1440, you will need a graphics card that supports DisplayPort 1.4 DSC (AMD RX 5xxx and NVIDIA GTX 16-series and RTX 20-series, or newer GPUs).

With older cards, you’ll be limited to 120Hz at 5120×1440. 

Other gaming features include Virtual Aim Point, pre-calibrated picture modes (FPS, RTS, RPG, and AOS) and Black Equalizer (improves visibility in darker games).

For more information, visit our Samsung Odyssey G9 review.

Design & Connectivity

samsung odyssey c49g95t monitor design

The design of the monitor includes a steep 1000R curvature for added immersion, glossy white chassis, and RGB lighting at the back of the monitor.

You can elevate the screen up to 120mm, tilt it by -5°/15°, swivel by +/- 15°, or VESA mount it (100x100mm).

Connectivity options are abundant and include two DisplayPort 1.4 inputs, HDMI 2.0 (max 5120×1440 60Hz or 3840×1080 120Hz, HDR is supported), a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

For cheaper alternatives, consider the following models:

  • Samsung C49RG9 – previous 49″ 5120×1440 DisplayHDR 1000 model with a lower 120Hz refresh rate and slower response time
  • AOC AG493UCX – 49″ 5120×1440 120Hz DisplayHDR 400
  • Samsung C49HG90 – 49″ 3840×1080 144Hz DisplayHDR 600

Samsung’s upcoming newer model of this monitor, the S49AG95NC, will have a mini LED backlight and 2048 dimming zones. It will be more expensive but offer a much better HDR image quality.

Best 4K Gaming Monitors

In this category, you’ll find the best 4K monitors for both PC and console gaming. Keep in mind that in order to run PC games at 4K UHD with decent frame rates and picture settings, you will need a powerful CPU and GPU.

The Pros:

  • Accurate and consistent colors
  • Wide color gamut, high pixel density
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync up to 60Hz
  • Fully ergonomic stand

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

Looking for an affordable 4K monitor for console gaming, PC gaming, content creation and other multimedia use? The ASUS VG289Q offers excellent value for the price!

Image Quality

The IPS panel of the ASUS VG289Q ensures stunning colors and details thanks to its 10-bit color depth, 90% DCI-P3 color gamut and 4K Ultra HD resolution.

And the good news? Such a high resolution on a 28″ screen results in a pixel density of 157 PPI, which makes individual pixels indistinguishable from one another. What’s more, you get plenty of screen space, though, for tiny items such as text to be readable, you will need to use scaling.

Other panel-related specs include a 350-nit peak brightness, 178-degree viewing angles and a 5ms response time speed, all of which are standard for a monitor at this price range.

Now, the ASUS VG289Q supports HDR, but it doesn’t have VESA’s entry-level DisplayHDR 400 certification. However, thanks to its wide color gamut, it does offer a better HDR picture quality than some HDR400-certified displays, which just have a slightly higher 400-nit peak brightness.

Naturally, for a ‘true’ HDR viewing experience, a monitor needs a much higher peak brightness and contrast ratio as well as local dimming with at least DisplayHDR 600 certification.

These displays are more expensive, though, and we’ll get into them as well later on.

1080p monitor vs 4K (Scaling)

Features

The ASUS VG289Q supports AMD FreeSync with a 40-60Hz range over HDMI and DisplayPort which makes it a great choice for the Xbox Series/One X and S.

It’s not certified as G-SYNC compatible by NVIDIA, but it delivers stable VRR performance.

Other available features include customizable crosshairs, Shadow Boost for better visibility in darker games, pre-calibrated picture presets, on-screen timers and a refresh rate tracker.

Design & Connectivity

asus vg289q monitor back

The ASUS VG289Q monitor has an ergonomic stand with up to 150mm height adjustment, -5°/20° tilt, 90° pivot, +/- 62° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

It’s also available with a tilt-only stand as the ASUS VG289Q1A for ~$20 less.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, one DisplayPort 1.2 input, 2x2W built-in speakers and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

If you’re looking for a cheaper 4K monitor, check out the Philips 278E1A which goes for ~$250, but it doesn’t support FreeSync nor HDR, and it has a tilt-only stand.

In case you want a 32″ 4K monitor, the LG 32UN650 is the most affordable model with an IPS panel. However, at that price range, we recommend getting a 28″ 4K 144Hz gaming monitor instead, such as the Acer XB283K KV for better performance.

You can find a 32″ 4K monitor with a VA panel for ~$350, such as the LG 32UL500 or the Dell S3221QS (with a curved screen), but you’ll have to cope with slow response time and narrow viewing angles.

The Pros:

  • Accurate and consistent colors
  • Wide color gamut, high pixel density
  • Quick response time speed
  • HDMI 2.1
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync and MBR up to 144Hz
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub, KVM, USB-C with 65W PD

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The Acer Predator XB283K KV is the best value 4K gaming monitor!

Image Quality

To start with, the IPS panel used in the XB283K offers a wide 90% DCI-P3 color gamut for vibrant and lifelike colors, and there’s a working sRGB mode.

In addition to the wide color gamut, HDR content will also get a boost in peak luminance to 400-nits from the standard 300-nits, and there are 8 dimming zones that can further push the standard 1,000:1 contrast ratio.

Now, as there are only 8 dimming zones, you’re not getting the true HDR viewing experience, but there’s some improvement in certain HDR scenes.

Features

The Acer XB283K KV supports a variable refresh rate with a 48-144Hz dynamic range, AMD FreeSync Premium Pro certification and stable G-SYNC performance.

The HDMI 2.1 port also allows you to utilize 4K 120Hz and VRR on the Xbox Series X and PS5!

However, the HDMI 2.1 port on the Acer XB283K KV is limited to 24 Gbit/s and relies on DSC for the rest of the required bandwidth. This doesn’t affect Xbox and PC gamers, but the PS5 is limited to 4:2:0 color format at 4K 120Hz.

The PS5 is already limited to 4:2:2 color format due to its own HDMI 2.1 limitations (32 Gbit/s), so you wouldn’t be getting a full 4:4:4 signal anyway. This type of compression mainly affects text clarity when displayed on colored backgrounds, so it’s not really a big issue for gaming.

Further, the monitor has a rapid 1ms GtG pixel response time speed with excellent overdrive implementation, so there’s no ghosting or overshoot in fast-paced games.

Other features include crosshair overlays, Black Boost, and customizable picture presets. See our Acer XB283K review for more details.

Design & Connectivity

Acer Predator XB283K KVbmiipruzx Review

The monitor has a height-adjustable stand (up to 115mm), it can tilt by -5°/20°, swivel by +/- 20°, pivot by 90°, or be VESA mounted (100x100mm).

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.1 ports, DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode, 65W PD), a headphone jack, a USB 3.0 hub (4 downstream + 1 upstream), two 2W integrated speakers and a built-in KVM switch.

Alternatives

  • Gigabyte M28U – sometimes goes on sale for $500, but it doesn’t have as good overdrive implementation and its USB-C port doesn’t have as strong PD

The Pros:

  • Accurate and consistent colors
  • Wide color gamut, high pixel density
  • Quick response time speed
  • DisplayHDR 1000, HDMI 2.1
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 160Hz
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Design lacks swivel option
  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology, but A-TW polarizer helps minimize the issue)

About The Monitor

For the same price as that of the Sony M9, you can get the LG 32GQ950 with a larger 32″ screen and a wider color gamut!

Image Quality

The 4K UHD resolution looks incredible even on 32″ screens, so most users prefer the 32″ 4K combination to ~27″ 4K or 32″ 1440p.

Further, the LG 32GQ950 also has a bit wider 98% DCI-P3 color gamut (~135% sRGB size) for rich and vibrant colors.

The monitor has VESA’s DisplayHDR 1000 certification with a 1000-nit peak brightness and 32 dimming zones, so some HDR scenes will look great, but not nearly as good as that of the Cooler Master GP27U.

Features

The monitor supports AMD FreeSync Premium Pro with a 48-160Hz range and it’s certified as ‘G-SYNC Compatible.’

Be sure to check out our full LG 32GQ950 review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

LG 32GQ950 Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is robust and offers height adjustment up to 110mm, -5°/15° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.1 ports, DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, a dual-USB 3.0 hub and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

Consider waiting for the upcoming 32″ 4K 144Hz IPS mini LED models.

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio, wide color gamut
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync and MBR up to 144Hz
  • DisplayHDR 1000
  • HDMI 2.1, USB-C, KVM, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Ghosting in fast-paced games, mainly in darker scenes
  • Only a few dimming zones
  • BGR subpixel layout

About The Monitor

If you want a large 43″ gaming monitor, the Gigabyte Aorus FV43U is the best model currently available – and it has HDMI 2.1!

Image Quality

The Aorus FV43U is based on a VA panel, so some ghosting will be noticeable in fast-paced games (mainly in darker scenes), but you get a high 4,000:1 contrast ratio for deep blacks, a stellar 1,000-nit peak brightness for vivid highlights, and a wide 99% Adobe RGB color gamut (~150% sRGB) for vibrant colors (sRGB clamp is available too).

There are only a few dimming zones, so you’re not getting the ‘true’ HDR viewing experience, but the picture is still excellent and significantly better than that of entry-level HDR monitors.

4K UHD resolution looks great even on 43″ screens as you get a pixel density of 103.67 PPI. However, since the monitor uses a BGR subpixel layout, text will look a bit fringy if you’re not using any scaling and are sitting close to the screen. So, if you plan on using the monitor for work too, have a look at our RGB vs BGR subpixel layout article.

Features

The monitor supports AMD FreeSync and you can use it with compatible NVIDIA graphics though it’s not officially certified as G-SYNC Compatible. So, you might experience some VRR brightness flickering with fluctuating frame rates.

Aim Stabilizer Sync is available as well, allowing for simultaneous VRR and MBR operation. Other features include various picture presets, PiP/PbP, crosshair overlays, on-screen timers, and Black Equalizer.

Design & Connectivity

Gigabyte Aorus FV43U Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and VESA mount compatible (200x200mm), while connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports, USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode), a dual-USB 3.0 hub, audio line-out and headphone ports, two 12W built-in speakers and an integrated KVM switch.

Note that the HDMI 2.1 ports on this monitor are limited to 24 Gbps and use DSC for 4K 144Hz 10-bit RGB color, just like with the Acer XB283K model. This isn’t an issue for the Xbox consoles and PC, but the PS5 will be limited to the 4:2:0 color format instead of 4:2:2.

This type of compression is not really noticeable in video games – text appears a bit smudgy when displayed on colored backgrounds, but you already get this to an extent with the default 4:2:2 chroma subsampling.

Best HDR Gaming Monitors

While some of the above-mentioned monitors do offer a decent HDR image quality, they can’t hold a candle to the following ‘true HDR’ displays!

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio, wide color gamut, high peak brightness
  • No backlight bleed or IPS/VA glow
  • Plenty of features, including VRR and MBR up to 120Hz
  • Quick response time speed
  • HDMI 2.1, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Risk of permanent image burn-in and temporary image retention
  • Not as bright as some high-end LED-backlit TVs
  • VRR near-black gamma shifts (alleviated by new firmware update)

About The TV

Although not a monitor, LG’s OLED TVs deliver an otherworldly gaming experience for both immersion and responsiveness. They’re actually cheaper than some worse big format gaming monitors.

Image Quality

LG’s C1 line-up includes a 48″ variant, which is much more practical for desktop use than the previous-gen (the C9) smallest model with a 55″ screen size.

Now, with 4K resolution on the 47.6″ viewable screen of the LG OLED48C1, you get a pixel density of 92.56 PPI. So, as long as you’re just ~3 ft (~1 meter) away from the screen, your eyes won’t be able to distinguish individual pixels.

Want to know the best part? The main asset of OLED technology is, of course, the infinite contrast ratio as each pixel produces its own light.

Other specs aren’t too shabby either and include a wide 98% DCI-P3 color gamut, impeccable 178° viewing angles and a peak brightness of 800-nits (~150-nits sustainable for 100% white window). So, for regular desktop use, ABL (Automatic Brightness Limiter) will need to change the screen’s brightness to preserve the panel.

A 100% white window is limited to around 150-nits. If you’re using the TV at a higher brightness than that, when you resize a Word document window, for instance, to ~50%, the brightness will increase.

These jumps in brightness can be annoying during regular desktop use, but you can alleviate it by just decreasing the brightness or contrast of the TV.

 100% White Window Max Brightness (SDR)100% White Window Max Brightness (HDR)10% White Window Max Brightness (HDR)1 - 3% White Window Max Brightness (HDR)
ASUS PG42UQ200-nits**120-nits800-nits800-nits
LG OLED42C2180-nits*120-nits700-nits700-nits
LG OLED48C1120-nits120-nits800-nits800-nits
Gigabyte FO48U110-nits110-nits500-nits600-nits
LG 48GQ900130-nits130-nits600-nits600-nits
ASUS PG48UQNot TestedNot TestedNot TestedNot Tested
LG OLED48C2Not TestedNot TestedNot TestedNot Tested
Dell AW3423DW250-nits250-nits600-nits1000-nits
Dell AW3423DWF250-nits250-nits600-nits1000-nits

*PC Mode, Game Optimizer enabled
**Uniform Brightness enabled

Further, LG’s OLED panels have a WBGR subpixel layout instead of the more common RGB. This results in some color fringing with small text, but it’s mainly noticeable when looking at it from up close. You won’t notice it in games and videos.

When it comes to gaming, the LG C1 boasts instantaneous 1ms pixel response time speed for zero ghosting and low input lag of ~14ms at 60Hz and ~7ms at 120Hz, which makes for imperceptible delay (Game Mode must be enabled).

Features

Moving on, the TV has a native 120Hz refresh rate, which is supported at 4K, 1440p and 1080p.

The G-SYNC Compatible mode is supported over HDMI 2.1 with RTX 20-series and GTX 16-series GPUs (or newer) with a 40-120Hz variable refresh rate range. It also supports FreeSync Premium (with HDR) over HDMI with a 40-120Hz range!

Alas, the VRR performance is not flawless as there are near-black gamma shifts. When any of the VRR technologies is enabled, gamma gets brightened up a bit.

LG offers a feature that helps alleviate the near-black gamma shifts, the ‘Fine Tune Dark Areas’ slider under ‘Additional Picture Settings’. You can adjust it from -30 to 30 in increments of 1; the lower you go, the darker the blacks become at cost of shadow detail clarity, while too high setting makes for too elevated blacks. The best results will vary depending on the game, and while the issue is not completely fixed, you can greatly reduce its intensity.

Now, the main downside of OLED TVs is the risk of permanent image burn-in, but unless you leave a static picture on your TV for hours, you have nothing to worry about.

The TV offers plenty of features to prevent this, such as Screen Shift, Automatic Pixel Refresher and Logo Luminance Adjustment.

Just like LED LCDs, OLEDs use the sample-and-hold method to display images, so some motion blur will always be visible with fast-moving objects. To reduce the perceived motion blur, there’s the BFI (Black Frame Insertion) feature called OLED Motion with three different intensity levels, which you can find under the TruMotion settings; BFI and VRR can’t be active at the same time though.

Besides HDR10 support, the LG C1 TVs also support Dolby Vision and HLG HDR formats. It’s based on WebOS 5.0 with smooth performance and plenty of apps.

For more information, check out our LG OLED48C1 review.

Design & Connectivity

LG OLED48C1 TV Design

The design of the TV is very slim, it has a cable management system and a VESA mount pattern (300x200mm), while the screen has a glossy finish that provides more vivid image quality, but it’s reflective – so, you’ll have to mind the lighting in your room.

Connectivity options include four HDMI 2.1 ports, three USB ports, an Ethernet port, tuner, composite-in, both analog and digital audio-out ports and WiFi (2.4 GHz and 5 GHz). It comes with a magic remote controller. 

Alternatives

The latest C2 series 48″ model is more expensive than the C1 yet it offers the same experience. In fact, the C2 doesn’t support BFI at 120Hz, only at 60Hz.

Gigabyte has a 48″ OLED gaming monitor based on the same panel, the Aorus FO48U, but it’s more expensive yet doesn’t offer any meaningful benefits.

The LG 48GQ900 and the ASUS PG48UQ 48″ OLED monitors also feature the same panel (overclocked to 138Hz), but with an anti-glare coating that’s more effective at preventing reflections than the glossy surface of the C1. However, the anti-glare coating adds some graininess to the screen, so the image isn’t as vivid.

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio, wide color gamut, high peak brightness
  • No backlight bleed or IPS/VA glow
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 120Hz
  • Quick response time speed
  • HDMI 2.1, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Risk of permanent image burn-in and temporary image retention
  • Not as bright as some high-end LED-backlit TVs
  • VRR near-black gamma shifts (alleviated by new firmware update)
  • No 120Hz BFI

About The TV

LG’s C2 series also includes a 42″ sized variant with a newer Evo panel that boasts a bit faster processor for its integrated smart features.

Besides being a bit more practical for regular desktop use, the 42″ screen also provides you with a higher pixel density (106 PPI) than that of the 48″ model (92 PPI), so you get even sharper details and text.

The main disadvantage of the C2 series is that it doesn’t allow BFI to be used at 120Hz; it’s limited to 60Hz. The 42″ C2 is also more expensive than the 48″ C1 OLED TV, at least at the moment.

Check out our full OLED42C2 review for more details.

Design & Connectivity

LG OLED42C2 TV Design

The design of the TV is a bit different from the C1 series as it has two legs, making it more practical for regular PC desks. However, besides VESA mount compatibility, there are no ergonomics.

Connectivity options are the same as that of the OLED48C1: four HDMI 2.1 ports, three USB ports, an Ethernet port, tuner, composite-in, both analog and digital audio-out ports and WiFi (2.4 GHz and 5 GHz). It also comes with a magic remote controller.

Alternatives

The ASUS PG42UQ monitor is based on the same panel with a 138Hz overclockable refresh rate, DisplayPort input and a matte anti-glare coating instead of a glossy screen surface. It can also get a bit brighter than the 42C2, but lacks Dolby Vision support.

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio, wide color gamut, high peak brightness
  • No backlight bleed or IPS/VA glow
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 165Hz
  • Quick response time speed
  • Ergonomic design, USB hub

The Cons:

  • No MBR

About The Monitor

For a lot of people, 48″ and even 42″ sized screens are still too big for regular desktop use. So, if you’re looking for something smaller for an incredible HDR gaming experience, you should get the Dell Alienware AW3423DWF.

Image Quality

The Dell AW3423DWF even has an OLED panel that’s enhanced with quantum dots (QD-OLED), which offers several important advantages over LG’s OLEDs.

To start with, the monitor can get a lot brighter with a 1,000-nits peak and 250-nits sustainable brightness. So, you get more vivid details and ABL isn’t nearly as aggressive as that of the LG C1.

Next, it has a wider color gamut with 99.3% DCI-P3 coverage (with adjustable sRGB and DCI-P3 color modes available and calibrated at Delta E < 2) for more vibrant and saturated colors, which also further increases perceived brightness.

Finally, its QD-OLED panel is more resistant to burn-in and image retention; you even get a three-year warranty that covers burn-in!

Just like every OLED panel, the AW3423DWF has an essentially infinite contrast ratio and instantaneous pixel response time speed.

Further, VRR is supported up to 165FPS for tear-free gameplay. However, MBR or BFI is not available.

Other features include crosshair overlays, Dark Stabilizer (improves visibility in dark scenes), on-screen timers, a refresh rate tracker and various picture presets.

While the 3440×1440 resolution is lower than 4K UHD, you actually get a higher pixel density of 110 PPI in comparison to 48″ and 42″ 4K displays, resulting in more screen space and sharper details – and it’s a lot easier on your GPU. Moreover, due to the ultrawide format, you get an extended field of view in compatible content.

Note that the AW3423DWF has regular RGB subpixels but in a triangular layout. So, some minor color fringing is noticeable on small text when looking at it from up close, but you won’t see this in games and videos.

Design & Connectivity

Dell AW3423DWF Review

The stand of the monitor is robust and versatile with up to 110mm height adjustment, -5°/21° tilt, +/- 20° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

The screen has a 1800R curvature for added immersion and a semi-glossy finish, so it offers more vivid image quality in comparison to matte anti-glare displays, but it’s not quite as clear (or reflective) as LG’s OLED panels.

Connectivity options include two DisplayPort 1.4 inputs, HDMI 2.0 (limited to 100Hz), a headphone jack, line-out and a quad-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

Dell AW3423DW – the same monitor but with a G-SYNC module and a higher 175Hz refresh rate; however, it’s up to $200 more expensive and has fewer features

The Pros:

  • 2048-zone mini LED FALD
  • High 2000-nit peak brightness
  • Wide color gamut, high pixel density
  • Plenty of features including VRR up to 240Hz
  • Quick response time
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Expensive
  • Noticeable blooming in some scenes

About The Monitor

In terms of image quality and performance, the Dell AW3423DWF is better than the Samsung Neo G9 even though it’s $700 – $1,200 cheaper! However, the Neo G9 still has some advantages that some users might prefer.

Image Quality

If you want a big 49″ super-ultrawide monitor, the Samsung Odyssey Neo G9 is the best model available. Especially for simulation games, a lot of gamers prefer the bigger and more curved 49″ panel of the G9, even though it doesn’t have as good HDR image quality or as fast response time speed.

Additionally, the Neo G9 has a much higher peak brightness of 2,000-nits, as well as a higher sustainable brightness of 600-nits and you don’t have to think about ABL, burn-in or image retention.

Moreover, while its 5120×1440 resolution results in the same pixel density of 110 PPI as 3440×1440 on 34″ sized screens, the Neo G9 has a regular RGB subpixel layout, so text is sharp and without any fringing, making it more appealing to those who work with text a lot.

Even though the Samsung Neo G9 has one of the best mini LED FALD implementations with 2048 dimming zones, some blooming is still noticeable in certain scenarios, mainly when it comes to demanding scenes such as starfields.

Further, the colors aren’t as vibrant with ~95% DCI-P3 gamut coverage, and while the pixel response time speed is quite fast for a LED-backlit panel, it’s not on par with OLEDs, so some minor ghosting and overshoot is detectable, but most gamers won’t be bothered by it.

Features

The Neo G9 supports AMD FreeSync with a 96-240Hz VRR range for tear-free gameplay up to 240FPS, while LFC prevents tearing below 96FPS. It’s not (yet) officially certified by NVIDIA as ‘G-SYNC Compatible’, but VRR works with compatible NVIDIA cards, though some users report micro-stuttering issues on their units.

Other useful features include Black Equalizer, crosshair overlays, various picture presets and PiP/PbP.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung Odyssey Neo G9 Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is very robust and offers a good range of ergonomics, including up to 120mm height adjustment, -5°/15° tilt, +/- 15° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports (limited to 144Hz), a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

The main disadvantage of the Neo G9 is the price. For $2,500, you can actually get the Dell AW3423DWF or the LG OLED48C1 for better HDR image quality and the previous Samsung Odyssey G9 version.

TCL/CSOT is also working on a 49″ 5120×1440 240Hz panel with a 5000-zone local dimming system, however, there’s no word on its pricing and release date yet.

About The Monitor

If you want an excellent HDR monitor, but don’t want a large 42″+ or ultrawide display, the Samsung Odyssey Neo G7 is your best bet.

Image Quality

The Neo G7 has an 1196-zone mini LED full-array local dimming solution, a 95% DCI-P3 color gamut and a high peak brightness of around 1,200-nits, providing you with amazing HDR image quality with deep blacks, vibrant colors and vivid highlights.

Moreover, it boasts a rapid 1ms GtG pixel response time speed for zero ghosting behind fast-moving objects, while variable refresh rate is supported for tear-free gameplay up to 165FPS.

Alternatively, you can use backlight strobing for even smoother motion at a cost of picture brightness.

Check out our full Samsung Neo G7 review for more details.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung S32BG75 Review

The stand of the monitor offers a good range of ergonomics, including up to 120mm height adjustment, +/- 15° swivel, +/- 90° pivot, -9°/13° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

The screen has a matte anti-glare coating against reflections, as well as an aggressive 1000R curvature that might not appeal to all users; it takes some time getting used to.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports with 40 Gbps and DSC, a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

The more expensive Neo G8 version has an even higher 240Hz refresh rate, but it’s prone to certain issues, such as scanlines. So, we recommend going with the Neo G7.

Conclusion

Did you find the best gaming monitor for you?

If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment below!

Overall, you can’t go wrong with the LG 24GN600 as the best budget option for both immersive and responsive gameplay.

If you want something a bit better, the Acer XV272UV and the Gigabyte M32Q offer excellent value for the price as far as 1440p 144Hz models go.

In case you can afford something a bit pricier, the Samsung G7, the Gigabyte M27Q-X, the LG 34GP83A, the Dell AW3821DW, the Samsung G9 and the LG 32GQ950, depending on your budget and preference, are all going to take your gaming experience to the next level.

Money is not an issue? The Dell AW3423DWF, the Neo G9, the Neo G7, the LG C2 or the LG C1 will provide you with the best HDR gaming experience currently possible!

For competitive gamers out there, we recommend the Dell S2522HG, the ViewSonic XG2431, the MSI MAG301RF, or the Acer XV252QF.

Changelog +

  • November 24, 2022:
    – Replaced the Dell AW3423DW with AW3423DWF, the MSI G273QF with the Acer XV272UV.
    – Removed the Sony Inzone M9.
  • October 14, 2022:
    – Checked up on the guide to ensure that our picks are still the best options available.
  • August 29, 2022:
    – Replaced the LG 24GN650 with 24GN600, the Acer XB323UGX with the LG 32GQ850, and the MSI MPG321UR-QD with the LG 32GQ950.
    – Removed the MSI MAG274QRF-QD.
    – Added the Samsung Neo G7.
  • July 5, 2022:
    – Replaced the LG 27GP950 with the Sony Inzone M9.
  • June 15, 2022:
    – Replaced the AOC CU34G2X with the Gigabyte G34WQC-A.
  • April 20, 2022:
    – Replaced the ASUS XG27AQM with the Gigabyte M27Q-X and the Acer XV252QF with the Acer Aopen 25XV2QF.
    – Added the LG OLED42C2.
  • April 15, 2022:
    – Added the LG OLED42C2 to the table. A review summary will be added soon.
  • March 14, 2022:
    – Replaced the ASUS PG32UQX with the Dell AW3423DW.
  • February 8, 2022:
    – Replaced the Gigabyte M28U with the Acer XB283KKV.
  • December 6, 2021:
    – Added review summaries for the monitors that were missing them.
  • November 25, 2021:
    – Checked up on the guide to ensure that our picks are still the best options available.
  • November 23, 2021:
    – Added best early Black Friday deals to the table.
  • October 6, 2021:
    – Replaced the Gigabyte G34WQC (discontinued) with the AOC CU34G2X.
  • September 8, 2021:
    – Replaced the LG 27GP850 with the MSI MAG274QRF-QD, the LG 32GP850 with the Gigabyte M32Q, and the Acer XV272UX with the ASUS XG27AQM.
  • July 30, 2021:
    – Replaced the Dell AW2521H with the Acer XV252QF.
    – Replaced the LG OLED48CX with the LG OLED48C1.
    – Added the Gigabyte M32U and the Samsung Odyssey Neo G9 to the table, review sections will be added soon.
  • July 4, 2021:
    – Added a video for this guide.
  • June 29, 2021:
    – Revamped the buyer’s guide – reduced the number of recommended monitors from 30 down to 17 for compactness and better readability. All the noteworthy monitors that were removed are now moved to ‘Alternatives.’
  • May 26, 2021:
    – Replaced the LG 27GL850 with the updated 27GP850 model.
  • May 7, 2021:
    – Replaced the ASUS PG259QN with the Dell AW2521H.
  • March 27, 2021:
    – Added information about LG’s new firmware update for the CX OLEDs, which alleviates the near-black gamma VRR issue.
  • February 9, 2021:
    – Added the LG 32GN650 as an alternative to the LG 32GK650F. It’s the updated model with a slightly different design and a slightly higher refresh rate.
  • December 24, 2020:
    – Replaced the Dell AW2721D with the Acer XV272UX.
  • December 9, 2020:
    – Added the BenQ EX2510 and the Dell AW2721D.
    – Replaced the AOC CU34G2X with the Gigabyte G34WQC.

Related Reads

Best Gaming Monitors Under 250 USD
The Best Gaming Monitors Under 250 USD (2022 Reviews)
Rob Shafer

Rob is a software engineer with a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver. He now works full-time managing DisplayNinja while coding his own projects on the side.