The Best HDR Monitors (2024 Reviews)

The selection of HDR monitors is nowhere as broad as the selection of HDR TVs. If you want to get the best possible HDR for the money, then check out this HDR monitor buying guide.

If you’re in the market for an HDR monitor, you’ve probably come across terms such as ‘fake HDR’ and ‘pseudo-HDR’ — and now you’re worried that you’ll end up buying a bad HDR display.

We don’t blame you!

Monitor manufacturers put HDR labels on just about anything these days, and that’s why in this buying guide, we’ll fill you in on everything you need to know about HDR when it comes to monitors.

TypeMonitorSizeResolutionPanelRefresh Rate
Best Mini LED HDR Monitors27"2560x1440VA180Hz
27"2560x1440IPS165Hz
27"2560x1440IPS240Hz
27"3840x2160IPS160Hz
32”3840x2160VA165Hz
32”3840x2160IPS144Hz
Best Mini LED UltraWide HDR Monitors34”3440x1440VA165Hz
49”5120x1440VA240Hz
57"7680x2160VA240Hz
Best UltraWide OLED HDR Monitors34"3440x1440OLED165Hz
39"3440x1440OLED240Hz
45"3440x1440OLED240Hz
49"5120x1440OLED240Hz
Best OLED HDR Monitors27"2560x1440OLED360Hz
32"3840x2160OLED240Hz
42"3840x2160OLED120Hz
premium pick

MSI MPG 321URX

MSI MPG 321URX Monitor
  • QD-OLED panel
  • Infinite contrast ratio
  • VRR up to 240Hz
best value

MSI MPG 271QRX

MSI MPG 271QRX Monitor
  • QD-OLED panel
  • Infinite contrast ratio
  • VRR up to 360Hz
budget pick

AOC Q27G3XMN

AOC Q27G3XMN Monitor
  • 336-mini LED FALD
  • 27″ 1440p fast VA panel
  • VRR up to 180Hz

In truth, these are the only displays worth buying for the sake of HDR. They feature either OLED or LED panels with full-array local dimming (FALD), which is essential for good HDR (High Dynamic Range) picture quality.

We didn’t include any monitors with edge-lit local dimming – while there are some great models out there, they simply cannot do justice to HDR.

Here’s why: the beauty of HDR image lies in the display’s ability to produce incredibly bright and vivid details in highlights of the picture while preserving black depth and details in shadows at the same time, thus creating this ‘high dynamic range.’

Of course, a wide color gamut and a high screen resolution are also very important in making the picture look great! 

On the other hand, LED-backlit HDR monitors without proper local dimming solutions simply cannot deliver a ‘true’ HDR picture as for them to produce specific bright details, for instance, their entire screen has to adapt, which leads to overexposing of dark areas.

You can view our changelogs for this buying guide at the end of this article.

Best Mini LED HDR Monitors

If you don’t want to deal with OLED’s risk of burn-in, limited brightness and uncommon subpixel layouts, mini LED is the way to go for HDR.

The Pros:

  • High peak brightness, decent pixel density, wide color gamut
  • 336-zone mini LED FALD
  • Decent response time, low input lag
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 180FPS
  • Fully ergonomic stand

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes
  • Minor ghosting
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

The AOC Q27G3XMN finally makes “budget HDR monitor” a thing.

Sure, $300 is still a lot for a gaming monitor to some users, but you get exceptional value for your money. In fact, unlike some $900+ “HDR monitors”, the Q27G3XMN actually delivers a true HDR experience.

Image Quality

To start with, the Q27G3XMN is the cheapest monitor with FALD (full-array local dimming), which is the most important feature if you want good HDR image quality on an LED-backlit display.

What’s more, it doesn’t skimp on the number of local dimming zones. With 336 mini LED dimming zones, you get excellent control over the backlight, resulting in simultaneously bright highlights (up to 1,200-nits) and deep inky blacks.

Edge lit Dimming vs Full array Dimming

Apart from the decent full-array local dimming solution that allows for bright highlights without sacrificing black depth, the AOC Q27G3XMN has a wide 96% DCI-P3 and 90% Adobe RGB color gamut for vibrant colors.

Further, the 1440p resolution results in a decent pixel density of 108 PPI (pixels per inch) on the 27″ viewable screen of the monitor, meaning that you’ll get plenty of screen space with sharp details and text.

While the image won’t be as sharp as that of a 27″ 4K display, it will still look crisp while being significantly less demanding to drive – and you won’t have to use any scaling.

The monitor’s VA panel also ensures 178° wide viewing angles (with minor VA gamma/saturation shift), as well as a rapid 1ms GtG pixel response time speed.

While the AOC Q27G3XMN still has some minor ghosting behind fast-moving objects, it’s not nearly as noticeable as it is with traditional high refresh rate VA panels.

Features

freesync and gsync

Moving on, the AOC Q27G3XMN supports a variable refresh rate for tear-free gameplay up to 180FPS.

Other features include Shadow Boost (improves visibility in dark scenes by manipulating the gamma curvature), Game Color, a crosshair overlay, various picture presets, on-screen timers and a refresh rate tracker.

Check out our AOC Q27G3XMN review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

AOC Q27G3XMN Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers height up to 130mm, pivot by 90°, -5°/23° tilt, +/- 30° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

  • KTC M27T20 – 27″ 1440p 165Hz VA gaming monitor with a bit wider color gamut and faster response time, 576-zone mini LED FALD, USB-C 90W and KVM – it’s about $150 more expensive though.
  • Acer XV275U P3 – newly released 27″ 1440p 170Hz flat-screen VA gaming monitor with a 576-zone mini LED FALD, but no USB-C or KVM

The Pros:

  • High peak brightness, decent pixel density, wide color gamut
  • 576-zone mini LED FALD
  • Quick response time, low input lag
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 165FPS
  • Fully ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options, including KVM and USB-C with 90W PD

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes

About The Monitor

The Cooler Master Tempest GP27Q is another affordable mini LED HDR gaming monitor, however, unlike the AOC Q27G3XMN and the KTC M27T20, it uses an IPS panel.

Image Quality

While the GP27Q has more dimming zones (576) than the Q27G3XMN, it uses an IPS panel with a lower native contrast ratio of ~1,000:1. So, in terms of black depth and blooming, it’s not actually a big improvement.

What the GP27Q does offer though, is a wider 99% Adobe RGB and 98% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage for even more vibrant colors.

On top of that, IPS panels have virtually flawless 178° wide viewing angles, resulting in consistent colors regardless of the angle you’re looking at the screen. This makes the GP27Q suitable for professional color-critical work too, whereas the Q27G3XMN can only be used for basic content creation.

Additionally, the Cooler Master GP27Q has a faster pixel response time speed, so you won’t have to worry about any ghosting behind fast-moving objects. You also get smooth VRR performance up to 165FPS for tear-free gameplay.

The downside is that the GP27Q costs almost twice as much as the Q27G3XMN, so it’s up to you whether these advantages are worth the extra cost.

Check out our full Cooler Master Tempest GP27Q review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Cooler Master Tempest GP27Q Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers height up to 110mm, pivot by 90°, -5°/20° tilt, +/- 15° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.0 ports, USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode, 90W PD), a dual-USB 3.0 hub, a headphone jack, dual 3W built-in speakers and integrated KVM functionality.

The Pros:

  • 576 dimming zones, high brightness, wide color gamut
  • High pixel density
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 240Hz
  • Fully ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options, including USB type-C with 65W PD and KVM

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes

About The Monitor

If you want an even higher refresh rate, there’s the AOC AG274QZM with 240Hz!

Image Quality

Now, while the AG274QZM offers a bit clearer motion and lower input lag in comparison to the GP27Q thanks to its higher refresh rate, the overall HDR image quality is rather similar due to the same 576-zone local dimming solution, ~1100-nit peak brightness, and similar ~97% Adobe RGB and DCI-P3 color gamut coverage.

Considering that AOC’s model is twice the price, we can only recommend it if you’re looking for a single display that’s great for both competitive FPS gaming and HDR content consumption.

The AOC Agon Pro AG274QZM supports VRR up to 240FPS and has plenty of useful features, such as Shadow Control, Game Color, a refresh rate tracker, various picture presets, RGB lighting, crosshair overlays and Picture by Picture.

Design & Connectivity

AOC AG274QZM Design

The stand is sturdy and ergonomic with up to 120mm height adjustment, 90° pivot, +/- 20° swivel, -3°/21° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

You also get a detachable shading hood and a small puck for quick OSD settings.

Connectivity options include DP 1.4, two HDMI 2.1 ports, USB-C with DP Alt Mode and 65W Power Delivery, a microphone jack, a headphone jack, two 5W integrated speakers, a quad-USB 3.0 hub and built-in KVM functionality.

Alternatives

AOC, MSI and ViewSonic also plan to release 27″ 1440p 300Hz gaming monitors with 576-zone mini LED FALD and dedicated G-SYNC Ultimate models in 2023, but pricing and release date are unknown at the moment.

The Pros:

  • High peak brightness, high pixel density, wide color gamut
  • 1152-zone mini LED FALD
  • Quick response time, low input lag
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 144FPS
  • Fully ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options, including KVM and USB-C with 90W PD

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes

About The Monitor

In comparison to the Tempest GP27Q and the AOC AG274QZM, the Innocn 27M2V provides you with a higher 4K UHD resolution and twice the zone count with an 1152-zone mini LED FALD backlight for a higher contrast ratio and less blooming.

Image Quality

Just like the GP27Q, the Innocn 27M2V has a wide 99% Adobe RGB and 99% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage as well as dedicated modes for each color space in the OSD menu. It also has a high 1200-nit peak brightness for HDR content.

While the difference between 4K and 1440p is not that noticeable on a 27″ monitor for watching videos and playing games, details and text are a lot sharper when it comes to regular desktop use, office-related work, photo/video editing, etc.

So, if you have a powerful enough GPU for high frame rate gaming at 4K, the Innocn 27M2V is worth the investment as the 1152 dimming zones provide you with a higher contrast ratio and less blooming.

The monitor also has a rapid 1ms GtG pixel response time speed and VRR support up to 144FPS for NVIDIA GPUs and 160FPS for AMD GPUs. The difference between 144Hz and 160Hz is not noticeable, so don’t worry about it if you have a GeForce card.

Other supported features include PiP/PbP support, crosshair overlays, a refresh rate tracker and Shadow Balance (improves visibility in dark scenes).

Check out our full Innocn 27M2V review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Innocn 27M2V Design

The stand of the monitor is robust and offers height adjustment up to 120mm, +/- 15° swivel, +/- 15° tilt, 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options are abundant and include two HDMI 2.1 ports, DP 1.4 with DSC, USB-C with DP Alt Mode and 90W Power Delivery (65W in HDR), dual 5W built-in speakers, integrated KVM functionality, a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

In case the Innocn 27M2V is not available in your region, check out the Redmagic 4K Gaming Monitor with the same panel and local dimming solution.

If neither is available and you want a 27″ 4K HDR display, you’ll have to settle with the Cooler Master Tempest GP27U, the KTC M27P20 Pro or the Acer XV275K P3 as an alternative. These three displays use the same panel with a fewer 576-zone FALD backlight yet they cost around the same as the 1152-zone models.

There’s also the LG 27GR95UM with a 1560-zone mini LED FALD backlight, but it currently has local dimming algorithm issues, so we can only recommend it once (or if) it gets a proper firmware update.

The Pros:

  • 1196 dimming zones, high brightness, wide color gamut
  • High pixel density
  • Plenty of features, including VRR and MBR up to 165Hz
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • The aggressive 1000R screen curvature won’t appeal to some gamers
  • Minor blooming (in very demanding scenes)
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

If you don’t mind its aggressive 1000R screen curvature, the Samsung Odyssey Neo G7 is one of the best mini LED gaming monitors available.

Image Quality

The Samsung Neo G7 has 1196 dimming zones and a high native contrast ratio of ~4,000:1, which allows it to produce much deeper blacks with fewer blooming artifacts than the IPS models, while the peak brightness is the same at around ~1,200-nits!

The 4K UHD resolution looks great even on 32″ sized displays with a pixel density of 138 PPI, resulting in plenty of screen real estate and sharp details.

Further, the monitor has a wide 95% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage and a rapid 1ms GtG pixel response time speed. So, you won’t get quite as vibrant colors as that of the IPS variants.

Now, the Neo G7 has a steep 1000R screen curvature that some users like, some don’t mind it, and some can’t stand it. So, it comes down to personal preference, but keep in mind it will take some time to get used to in case you don’t like it at first.

Features

Variable refresh rate is supported over HDMI 2.1 VRR and FreeSync Premium up to 165FPS. While the monitor doesn’t have official G-SYNC Compatible certification by NVIDIA, you can use VRR with GeForce cards without issues.

Some units might exhibit some VRR brightness flickering, in which case you can use the VRR Control feature to prevent it (though this can introduce some micro-stutter).

Motion Blur Reduction is available as well, which uses backlight strobing to improve motion clarity at the cost of picture brightness.

Other noteworthy features include Black Equalizer, various picture presets, crosshair overlays, a refresh rate tracker, Picture in Picture, Adaptive Picture (integrated sensors) and CoreSync RGB lighting at the back of the monitor.

Check out our full Samsung Neo G7 review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung S32BG75 Review

The stand of the monitor is prone to some wobbling, but it has full ergonomic support with up to 120mm height adjustment, +/- 15° swivel, +/- 90° pivot, -9°/13° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports with 40 Gbps and DSC, a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

The Samsung Odyssey Neo G8 model has a higher 240Hz refresh rate, but it has scanline issues. Considering how demanding 4K UHD is for high frame rates with decent picture settings in most games, we recommend the cheaper Neo G7.

The Pros:

  • High pixel density
  • Accurate and vibrant colors
  • Plenty of features including VRR up to 144Hz
  • Fully ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options, including KVM and USB-C with 90W PD

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes

About The Monitor

In case you want a flat-screen 32″ 4K high refresh rate HDR gaming monitor, the Innocn 32M2V is the best option available.

Image Quality

Since it has an IPS panel and a 1152-zone mini LED FALD backlight, the Innocn 32M2V will have a bit more blooming artifacts in comparison to the Samsung Odyssey Neo G7.

However, you will get a significantly wider color gamut with 99% Adobe RGB and 99% DCI-P3 color space coverage, wider viewing angles and smoother VRR performance for tear-free gameplay up to 160FPS without any brightness flickering!

Additionally, the Innocn 32M2V offers plenty of features, such as integrated KVM functionality and a USB-C port with DP Alt Mode and 90W Power Delivery, as well as the standard gaming features.

Check out our Innocn 32M2V review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Innocn 27M2V Design

The stand is sturdy and offers height adjustment up to 80mm, +/- 25° swivel, -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.1 ports with full 48 Gbps bandwidth, DP 1.4 with DSC, USB-C with DP Alt Mode and 90W PD, two 5W built-in speakers, a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

  • Innocn 32A6V – the same monitor with a darker design
  • Acer Predator X32FP – has a bit faster response time, but fewer dimming zones (576) and it’s also more expensive (~$1200)

There’s also the ASUS PG32UQXR, based on the same panel as the Acer X32FP. However, it’s usually $300 more expensive and although it has DisplayPort 2.1, the DP 1.4 does just fine on the X32FP thanks to DSC, which is a visually lossless compression.

You can also find the ViewSonic XG321UG and the ASUS PG32UQX models with 1152-zone mini LED FALD backlights and G-SYNC Ultimate modules with DisplayHDR 1400, but they go for ~$2,500 yet have a slower response time speed and no HDMI 2.1.

Best Mini LED UltraWide HDR Monitors

Want an ultrawide monitor with a mini LED backlight for proper HDR support? You’ll find al the best models right here!

The Pros:

  • 2304-zone mini LED FALD
  • High contrast ratio, vibrant colors
  • Plenty of features including VRR up to 165Hz
  • Ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options, KVM, USB-C 90W PD

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes
  • Minor ghosting behind fast-moving objects (mostly in dark scenes)
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

Want a 34″ 3440×1440 curved ultrawide monitor with a mini LED backlight? The Innocn 34M1R might be for you!

Image Quality

The Innocn 34M1R boasts a 2304-zone mini LED FALD backlight, a 1,000-nit peak brightness and a wide 99% DCI-P3 and Adobe RGB color gamut for an amazing HDR viewing experience.

It also has a high 165Hz refresh rate, VRR support and a decent pixel response time speed for a VA panel. This means that some ghosting will be noticeable in fast-paced games (mostly in darker scenes), but most users will find it tolerable.

You also get professional-grade Delta E < 2 factory calibration and plenty of additional features, including PiP/PbP support.

Design & Connectivity

Innocn 34M1R Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers a good range of ergonomics with up to 120mm height adjustment, -5°/20° tilt, +/- 25° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

The screen has a light matte anti-glare coating and a 1500R curvature for added immersion.

Connectivity options include USB-C with DP Alt Mode and 90W PD, DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports, a dual-USB 3.0 hub, integrated speakers (the soundbar below the bottom bezel) and a headphone jack.

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio, impressive peak brightness, decent color gamut
  • Fast response time
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 240Hz
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Expensive
  • Noticeable blooming in some scenes
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

Now, as we mentioned earlier, even though mini LED FALD monitors are brighter than OLEDs and don’t suffer from the risk of burn-in, they offer an overall inferior HDR gaming experience due to the lower contrast ratio, blooming artifacts and slower pixel response time. However, if you want a 49″ super-ultrawide gaming monitor with good HDR image quality, the Samsung Odyssey Neo G9 is a viable option.

Image Quality

This gigantic 49″ sized screen has a mini LED backlight that’s capable of reaching up to 1,000-nits of brightness for small windows and a brief time, as well as a strong 400-nits sustained brightness for SDR (600-nits for HDR) with a 100% white window. So, the monitor is overall brighter and can produce punchier highlights.

However, even though it has one of the best FALD implementations with 2048 zones, it still has over 7 million pixels, so those zones won’t be able to always effectively dim parts of the image that are supposed to be dark without some light bleeding into them from the surrounding lit zones, thus creating blooming or the halo effect.

To be fair, this is not a big issue unless you’re looking at a particularly demanding scene, such as fireworks and stars in the night sky.

The Samsung Odyssey Neo G9 also doesn’t have as vibrant colors as that of OLEDs with around 95% DCI-P3 gamut coverage (~85% Adobe RGB, ~125% sRGB gamut size).

Moving on, while the monitor is rather fast for an LED-backlit panel, some minor ghosting and overshoot can be detected with some fast-moving objects, though it won’t bother most users.

The 5120×1440 resolution results in a pixel density of 110 PPI on the 49″ sized screen of the monitor and you get a regular RGB subpixel layout, so text is sharp and clear with plenty of screen real estate available.

Lastly, the monitor supports FreeSync Premium Pro and it’s G-SYNC Compatible with a 96-240Hz range, however, VRR can cause micro-stuttering on some units, which some users might find bothersome.

Other useful features include Black Equalizer, PiP/PbP and RGB lighting.

Visit our Samsung Neo G9 review for more details.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung Odyssey Neo G9 Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is robust and versatile with up to 120mm height adjustment, -5°/15° tilt, +/- 15° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility, while the screen has an aggressive 1000R curvature for added immersion and a matte anti-glare coating against reflections.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports (limited to 144Hz), a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

If you’re looking for something a bit different yet also extravagant, check out the Samsung Odyssey Ark. It’s a 55″ 4K UHD display with a 1000R curved fast VA panel and a 1056-zone mini LED FALD backlight.

Considering its screen size though, the amount of dimming zones is not as generous as that of the G95NA. Therefore, the HDR image quality won’t be as good as that of the Neo G9 yet the display is more expensive. It’s more of a niche display for those looking for a curved 55″ display that can be used both vertically and horizontally.

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio, impressive peak brightness, decent color gamut
  • Fast response time
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 240Hz
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub, KVM

The Cons:

  • Expensive
  • Noticeable blooming in some scenes
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

The Samsung Odyssey G95NC is basically a beefed-up version of the G95NA.

Image Quality

While the G95NA is equivalent to two 27″ 2560×1440 displays side by side, the G95NC is comparable to two 32″ 4K monitors sitting next to each other, just without the bezels in between them.

This 57″ super-ultrawide gaming monitor has a screen resolution of 7680×2160, so you will need a powerful PC rig to do it justice. Keep in mind that the RTX 40-series GPUs don’t support the maximum resolution of this monitor – they’re limited to 120Hz at 7680×2160, whereas AMD’s 7000-series cards support 240Hz.

However, even with the RTX 4090, you won’t be able to get over 120FPS at 7680×2160 with decent picture settings in most games. So, you can think of this monitor as an investment for your future GPU upgrades.

The Samsung Odyssey G9/G95NC S57CG95 has a peak brightness of 1300-nits for <10% white windows and up to 800-nits for 100% white windows. Thanks to its 2392-zone mini LED FALD backlight, blooming is minimal, though still noticeable in demanding scenes.

Finally, you get a respectable 95% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage, a rapid 1ms GtG pixel response time speed and the standard gaming feature set, including VRR support up to 240Hz.

Check out our full Samsung G95NC review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung Odyssey Neo G9 57 inch Model Design

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 120mm, -5°/12° tilt, +/- 15° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility. The screen has a steep 1000R curvature for added immersion.

Connectivity options include DP 2.1, three HDMI 2.1 ports, a headphone jack, two USB-A 3.0 ports and two USB-B ports for the integrated KVM functionality.

Best UltraWide OLED HDR Monitors

Don’t want to deal with blooming artifacts of mini LED monitors? Want an instantaneous pixel response time speed and an infinite contrast ratio without backlight bleeding? An OLED monitor is for you!

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio, high peak brightness, wide color gamut
  • Instant response time
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 165Hz
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub
  • 3-year warranty that covers burn-in

The Cons:

  • Risk of burn-in
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

The Dell Alienware AW3423DWF is the best HDR gaming monitor you can get right now and the good news is that it’s actually cheaper than many inferior displays!

Image Quality

Based on an OLED panel, the AW3423DWF has self-emissive pixels that can individually turn off thereby providing you with true blacks and an infinite contrast ratio without any backlight bleeding, blooming, or glowing.

Another advantage of OLEDs is that the pixels can instantaneously change colors, resulting in no noticeable trailing behind fast-moving objects, making them ideal for fast-paced games.

The Dell AW3423DWF uses Samsung’s new QD-OLED panel that’s enhanced with quantum dots for a wider color gamut, higher brightness and better burn-in resistance.

It covers 99.3% of the DCI-P3 color space and 95% Adobe RGB, which is equivalent to around 149% sRGB gamut size. The colors are vibrant and rich, allowing you to watch HDR content the way its creators intended.

You’ll also find dedicated sRGB and DCI-P3 color modes with adjustable brightness and gamma in case you want to do color-critical work or to view SDR content without over-saturation.

Further, the monitor has a peak brightness of 1,000-nits and it can sustain 250-nits when displaying a 100% white window, which is brighter than that of any other OLED currently available.

 100% White Window Max Brightness (SDR)100% White Window Max Brightness (HDR)10% White Window Max Brightness (HDR)1 - 3% White Window Max Brightness (HDR)
Samsung QD-OLED Panels250-nits250-nits500-nits1000-nits
ASUS PG34WCDM270-nits270-nits750-nits1200-nits
ASUS PG27AQDM250-nits160-nits850-nits900-nits
LG 27GR95QE200-nits130-nits650-nits650-nits
LG 45GR95QE160-nits160-nits650-nits800-nits
Corsair Xeneon Flex190-nits160-nits650-nits800-nits
LG OLED42C3180-nits130-nits700-nits700-nits
ASUS PG42UQ200-nits120-nits800-nits800-nits
LG OLED48C3200-nits150-nits800-nits800-nits
Gigabyte FO48U110-nits110-nits500-nits600-nits
LG 48GQ900130-nits130-nits600-nits600-nits

*PC Mode, Game Optimizer enabled
**Uniform Brightness enabled

The main disadvantage of OLEDs is the risk of image burn-in.

If a static image is left on the screen for too long, some bright elements can become permanently stuck. However, as long as you use a screen saver and the monitor’s integrated features, such as Pixel Refresher and Panel Refresher, you’ll be fine. Dell even offers a three-year warranty that covers burn-in.

Moving on, the Dell Alienware AW3423DWF has an ultrawide resolution of 3440×1440 pixels, which results in a pixel density of 110 PPI (pixels per inch) on its 34″ viewable screen. Overall, you get plenty of screen space with sharp details and no scaling necessary, while the ultrawide format provides you with an extended field of view in compatible games. Moreover, it’s not nearly as demanding to drive as 4K UHD.

One thing to keep in mind is that while the monitor has regular RGB subpixels, they’re in a triangular layout, so there’s some colored fringing on small text. For gaming and videos, it’s not an issue, but if you’re looking at text a lot (coding, writing), it might bother you a bit. Hopefully, Windows ClearType and MacOS HiDPI scaling can be updated to address the new QD-OLED panels.

Features

The Dell AW3423DWF supports VRR (variable refresh rate) for tear-free gameplay up to 165Hz/FPS.

The combination of the instant response time, imperceptibly low input lag and VRR ensure a responsive and enjoyable gaming experience. Unfortunately, MBR (Motion Blur Reduction) is not supported, which could’ve reduced the otherwise unavoidable perceived motion blur via backlight strobing.

Other features include Dark Stabilizer (improves visibility in dark scenes), crosshair overlays, on-screen timers, a refresh rate tracker, RGB lighting, PiP/PbP and more.

Check out our full Dell AW3423DWF review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Dell AW3423DWF Review

The stand of the monitor is robust and versatile with up to 110mm height adjustment, -5°/21° tilt, +/- 20° swivel, +/- 4° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

The screen has a subtle 1800R curvature and a semi-glossy finish with an anti-reflective treatment. So, it offers a clearer picture than that of displays with matte anti-glare coatings, but it’s not as reflective or quite as vivid as pure glossy screens.

Connectivity options include two DisplayPort 1.4 inputs, HDMI 2.0 (limited to 100Hz), a headphone jack, line-out and a quad-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

There are 6 monitors that use the same QD-OLED panel, offering a similar image quality and performance. However, they still have some differences in features, warranty, connectivity options, price, HDR accuracy, etc. Here’s how they compare:

 Dell AW3423DWFDell AW3423DWMSI MEG342CMSI 341CQPSamsung OLED G8Philips Evnia 34M2C8600
Max. Refresh Rate165Hz (120Hz 10-bit)175Hz (144Hz 10-bit)175Hz 10-bit175Hz 10-bit175Hz 10-bit175Hz 10-bit
Ports2x DP 1.4,
1x HDMI 2.0,
4x USB
1x DP 1.4,
2x HDMI 2.0,
4x USB
1x DP 1.4
2x HDMI 2.1
1x USB-C (65W PD)
4x USB
1x DP 1.4
2x HDMI 2.1
1x USB-C,
2x USB
1x Mini-DP 1.4,
1x micro HDMI 2.1
1x USB-C (65W PD)
1x USB-C
1x DP 1.4,
2x HDMI 2.0,
1x USB-C (90W PD),
4x USB
Cooling fans121NoneNone1
HDR
(AMD GPUs)
GoodGoodGoodGoodBad*Bad**
HDR
(NVIDIA GPUs)
GoodGoodGoodGoodGoodBad**
PiP/PbPYesNoYesYesNoYes
Ambient Light SensorNoYesYesNoYesYes
Updatable FirmwareYesYesYesYesYesYes
Other Notable FeaturesN/AG-SYNC moduleKVM switchKVM SwitchTizen OSKVM Switch
Ambiglow RGB
Price (MSRP)$1,100$1,300$1,100$900$1,500$800
Burn-in Warranty (in the US)3 years3 years3 years3 yearsN/AN/A
*Limited to ~450-nits unless VRR is disabled
**HDR Game Mode reaches ~1000-nits but over-brightens the image, while True Black Mode is limited to ~450-nits and some scenes are too dark

The pricing and warranty can vary by region. Generally, we recommend going with the Dell AW3423DWF due to its price and warranty that covers burn-in.

There are also 34″ 3440×1440 240Hz W-OLED gaming monitors available, such as the ASUS PG34WCDM and the LG 34GS95QE. While they offer a higher refresh rate, their W-OLED panel has more noticeable fringing issues, not as high color volume and gamut, a steep 800R screen curvature, and they’re more expensive.

We’re also expecting more 34″ and 39″ W-OLED models, as well as monitors using Samsung’s third-gen 34″ 3440×1440 240Hz QD-OLED panel in 2024. Check out our OLED monitors article for more information.

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio, decent peak brightness, wide color gamut
  • Instant response time
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 240Hz
  • 2-year warranty that covers burn-in

The Cons:

  • Risk of burn-in
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

If you want a larger ultrawide HDR monitor, check out the LG 39GS95QE!

Image Quality

A lot of gamers prefer ultrawide displays larger than the most popular 34″ models, mainly in the 38″ – 39″ form factor range. However, they also prefer the screen resolution to scale up for that high pixel density, in this case, that would be 3840×1600 for the same ~110 PPI of the 34″ 3440×1440 models.

Unfortunately, the LG 39GS95QE has the same 3440×1440 resolution as those 34″ models, so while you get a bigger screen and the same amount of screen real estate, text and fine details won’t be as sharp.

You get a pixel density of roughly 95 PPI, which is the same as that of a 24″ 1080p or a 32″ 2560×1440 display. So, the details are still going to be reasonably sharp. To help illustrate the size of this monitor, you can think of the LG 39GS95QE as a 32″ 2560×1440 display with ~30% extra width.

It uses LG’s W-OLED panel with improved brightness of up to 1300-nits peak (for small HDR highlights) and 275-nits for 100% APL (Average Picture Level, white window size). However, its colors aren’t quite as bright and saturated as that of QD-OLED panels, but you still get an excellent 98.5% DCI-P3 gamut coverage.

Further, this LG’s W-OLED panel still uses the older RWBG (instead of their new RGWB) subpixel layout that will cause minor fringing on small text and fine details. This isn’t noticeable in videos and games, but it can be distracting if you plan on doing a lot of work that involves reading and typing.

Finally, the LG 39GS95QE has a high 240Hz refresh rate, which in addition to OLED’s instantaneous pixel response time speed ensures buttery-smooth performance. VRR is supported as well with NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatible and AMD FreeSync Premium Pro certifications for tear-free gameplay up to 240FPS.

Design & Connectivity

LG UltraGear 39GS95QE B Review

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers a good range of ergonomics, including up to 120mm height adjustment, +/- 10° swivel, -10°/15° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

The screen has a steep 800R curvature for added immersion and a bit heavier matte anti-glare coating that adds some graininess to the image (mainly noticeable on solid colors) but it efficiently prevents reflections.

Connectivity options are abundant and include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports with full 48 Gbps bandwidth, a headphone jack (with DTS Headphone:X support) and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

  • ASUS ROG Swift PG39WCDM – ASUS’ model based on the same panel with KVM, USB-C (90W Power Delivery, DP Alt Mode), BFI up to 120Hz and a better 3-year burn-in warranty. No word on pricing and availability yet though.

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio, decent peak brightness, wide color gamut
  • Instant response time
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 240Hz
  • Bendable screen, USB hub
  • 3-year warranty that covers burn-in

The Cons:

  • Risk of burn-in
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)
  • Tilt-only stand, not VESA mount compatible
  • Expensive
  • Low pixel density

About The Monitor

Those looking for a premium HDR gaming monitor might be interested in the Corsair Xeneon Flex 45WQHD240 with a bendable screen!

Image Quality

A 45″ ultrawide is taller than a 32″ 16:9 monitor and almost as wide as a 49″ super-ultrawide display, which results in a particularly immersive viewing experience.

Its 3440×1440 resolution is not ideal for such a huge screen size as you get a pixel density of ~83 PPI (similar to that of 27″ 1080p displays) on top of the RWBG subpixel layout, so text and fine details won’t be that sharp.

However, since you’ll be sitting further away from the screen as you would from a 27″ 1080p monitor, the individual pixels won’t be noticeable.

In games and videos, this won’t be an issue at all, and a higher 5120×2160 resolution would be significantly more demanding on the GPU.

The Corsair Flex also has a bendable screen, allowing you to bend it anywhere between 800R and completely flat.

It also has a decent peak brightness (190-nits for SDR, up to ~800-nits for HDR), 98% DCI-P3 wide color gamut and VRR support up to 240Hz for tear-free gameplay. The monitor also features crosshair overlays, a refresh rate tracker and PiP/PbP support.

Design & Connectivity

Corsair Xeneon Flex 45WQHD Monitor Design

The stand is tilt-only by ~22° and while its legs are removable, the screen is not VESA mount compatible, but Corsair plans to release a mounting accessory in Q1 2023.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.1 ports, DP 1.4 with DSC, USB-C with DP Alt Mode and 30W PD, a quad-USB 3.0 hub and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

The Xeneon Flex goes for $1,500 – 2,000. The LG 45GR95QE is based on the same panel and can be found on sale for $1,200. However, it has a fixed 800R screen curvature that a lot of users might find too steep, and its warranty is only 2 years.

Check out our LG 45GR95QE review for more information and a more detailed comparison.

LG also released two newer models: 45GS95QE and 45GS96QB with a higher 275-nit (100% APL) and 1300-nit (1% APL) peak brightness specified (not tested yet) for $1200 – $1700. The QB variant also has a USB-C port with 65W PD.

Therefore, we only recommend getting the Xeneon Flex when you can find it on sale for $1,500. If you don’t need a bendable screen and would rather have a bit brighter image and save some money, try catching the newer 45GS95QE or 45GS96QB models on sale for $1,200 – $1,300.

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio, decent peak brightness, wide color gamut
  • Instant response time
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 240Hz

The Cons:

  • Risk of burn-in
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

The Samsung Odyssey OLED G9 is the best super-ultrawide gaming monitor with an OLED panel; it’s available as G95SC with built-in Smart features and as G93SC without Smart features for ~$100 less.

Image Quality

The Samsung OLED G9 brings all of the advantages of OLED (infinite contrast and instant response times) to the 49″ super-ultrawide form factor that many gamers love.

It uses Samsung’s QD-OLED panel, which means high peak brightness and vibrant colors. It’s a third-gen panel with a better subpixel layout, so fringing on small text and fine details is barely an issue now.

You’ll also find plenty of useful features, including VRR up to 240Hz (FreeSync Premium Pro certified), Black Equalizer, crosshair overlays and PiP/PbP.

Check out our full Samsung OLED G9 review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung Odyssey OLED G9 Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers up to 120mm height adjustment, -2°/15° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

The screen has an 1800R curvature, which is more subtle than the 1000R curvature of the Samsung Odyssey Neo G9 mini LED models. At the rear of the monitor, there’s the CoreSync RGB lighting that can synchronize with on-screen content.

Connectivity options include DP 1.4 with DSC, HDMI 2.1, micro-HDMI 2.1, two 5W built-in speakers, a headphone jack, one upstream USB-C port and two downstream USB-C ports. The G95SC model also has WiFi and Bluetooth.

Best OLED HDR Monitors

Would you rather have an OLED HDR monitor with the standard 16:9 aspect ratio? Here are the best models available!

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio, decent peak brightness, wide color gamut
  • Instant response time
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 360Hz
  • Fully ergonomic design and rich connectivity options, including KVM and USB-C with 90W PD
  • 3-year warranty that covers burn-in

The Cons:

  • Risk of burn-in
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

If you’re not a fan of the ultrawide format, the MSI MPG 271QRX is available in the popular 27″ form factor with a 1440p 360Hz QD-OLED panel!

Image Quality

The MSI MPG 271QRX uses Samsung’s QD-OLED panel with a high peak brightness (250-nits SDR, 1000-nits HDR) and a wide 99.3% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage with Delta E < 2 factory calibration (for sRGB, Adobe RGB and DCI-P3 modes).

Further, thanks to its higher 360Hz refresh rate, motion is clearer and you get smooth VRR performance.

The MSI MPG 271QRX uses Samsung’s 3rd-gen QD-OLED panel with an improved subpixel layout, so there will be less fringing on small text and fine details.

Supported features include RGB lighting, Night Vision, crosshair overlays, a refresh rate tracker, various picture presets and on-screen timers. It also supports Picture in Picture / Picture by Picture.

Design & Connectivity

MSI MPG 271QRX Monitor Design

The stand offers height adjustment up to 110mm, -5°/15° tilt, +/- 30° swivel, +/- 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

It has a heatsink for cooling and a semi-glossy screen finish for a more vivid image, but it’s reflective and raises the black level when hit with direct lighting.

Connectivity options include DP 1.4, two 48 Gbps HDMI 2.1 ports, USB-C (DP Alt Mode and 90W Power Delivery), a headphone jack, a built-in KVM and a dual-USB 2.0 hub (2 downstream + 1 upstream).

Alternatives

  • MSI MAG 271QPX – the same model but without KVM, USB-C and USB hub (also doesn’t support firmware updates) for $50 less
  • Dell AW2725DF – based on the same panel, no KVM/USB-C

In 2024, other manufacturers are also going to release their models based on the same 27″ 1440p 360Hz QD-OLED panel. In Q3 2024, we’re also expecting 27″ 1440p 480Hz W-OLED gaming displays.

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio, decent peak brightness, wide color gamut
  • High pixel density
  • Instant response time
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 240Hz
  • Ergonomic design and rich connectivity options, including KVM and USB-C with 90W PD
  • 3-year warranty that covers burn-in

The Cons:

  • Risk of burn-in
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

In case you’d rather have a larger screen with a higher resolution and a still rapid 240Hz refresh rate, the MSI MPG 321URX is for you!

Image Quality

The difference between 240Hz and 360Hz is not that noticeable, so a lot of gamers will be interested in the MSI MPG 321URX with a 31.5″ 4K panel.

Just like the 271QRX, the 32″ model uses Samsung’s QD-OLED panel with the same semi-glossy finish, improved subpixel layout, 250-nits/1000-nits peak brightness and wide color gamut. It also has excellent Delta E < 2 factory calibration for both sRGB and DCI-P3.

The MSI MPG 321URX also offers a higher resolution, which results in a higher pixel density with 140 PPI for sharper text and details.

You also get the same gaming features, such as PiP/PbP, crosshair overlays, Night Vision, etc.

Check out our full MSI MPG 321URX review for more details.

Design & Connectivity

MSI 321URX Review

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers a good range of ergonomics, including up to 110mm height adjustment, -5°/15° tilt, +/- 30° swivel, +/- 10° pivot for balancing and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

It has a heatsink for cooling and a semi-glossy screen finish for a more vivid image, but it’s reflective and raises the black level when hit with direct lighting.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports with full 48 Gbps and CEC support, USB-C with DP Alt Mode and 90W Power Delivery, a dual-USB 2.0 hub (2 downstream + 1 upstream type B), a headphone jack and built-in KVM functionality.

Alternatives

The MSI MPG 321URX is the most affordable 32″ 4K 240Hz QD-OLED model in the US, going for just $950. However, in other regions, the following alternatives might be cheaper.

  • Dell AW3225QF – curved model with Dolby Vision, no USB-C/KVM
  • ASUS PG32UCDM – flat-screen model with Dolby Vision, USB-C/KVM and BFI up to 120Hz

In 2024, other manufacturers are going to release various 32″ 4K 240Hz QD-OLED flat-screen models as well. Check out our OLED monitors article for more details.

There’s also the LG 32GS95UE model with a 32″ 4K 240Hz W-OLED panel with a 1080p 480Hz Dual Mode. However, it’s more expensive, doesn’t have as accurate or good HDR image quality and the 1080p resolution on a 32″ sized screen results in a blurry image. So, competitive gamers should consider the upcoming 1440p 480Hz OLED models instead.

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio, decent peak brightness, wide color gamut
  • Instant response time
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 120Hz
  • Rich connectivity options, smart OS

The Cons:

  • Risk of burn-in
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

Looking for a larger OLED monitor? Sadly, there are no 32″ OLED gaming monitors available yet, so you’ll have to settle for LG’s 42″ OLED TV.

Image Quality

For most people, a 42″ screen will be too big for regular desktop use. However, if you don’t mind its size, the LG OLED42C3 offers exceptional value for the money as it can be found for as low as $850!

It offers a similar image quality as that of other OLED dispalys with wide viewing angles, a wide color gamut, an infinite contrast ratio and decent brightness. 4K UHD resolution also results in a similar pixel density of 106 PPI on the 42″ sized screens.

Motion clarity is not as smooth due to the lower 120Hz refresh rate, but you still get instantaneous pixel response time speed and smooth VRR performance.

Since it is a TV, you also get all the smart features and even Dolby Vision support.

Design & Connectivity

LG OLED42C3 Design

The LG OLED42C3 has a design with legs to better fit on a regular PC desk, but there are no ergonomic adjustments apart from VESA mount compatibility. It has a glossy screen finish for a more vibrant image quality, but it’s reflective.

Connectivity options include four HDMI 2.1 ports, RJ45, tuner, composite-in, both analog and digital audio jacks, three USB 2.0 ports, WiFi, Bluetooth and dual 10W integrated speakers (no subwoofer though).

Alternatives

  • ASUS PG42UQ – Based on the same panel with a 138Hz factory overclocked refresh rate, matte anti-glare coating, a heatsink for a bit higher brightness and a DisplayPort input; however, it doesn’t have any smart TV features or Dolby Vision support, and it goes for $1,400. While it is better for PC use overall (unless you prefer a glossy screen finish), it’s not worth the extra $550 over the C3 that can be found for $850. The KTC G42P5 is another alternative with a matte anti-glare coating at ~$1,100.

Conclusion

Found the best HDR monitor for you?

Feel free to leave us any questions you might have in the comments below!

All in all, we recommend the MSI MPG 321URX. In case you prefer the ultrawide format, go with the Dell AW3423DWF or wait for one of the upcoming models.

If you’re on a more limited budget, the AOC Q27G3XMN, the Cooler Master Tempest GP27Q and the Innocn 27M2V all offer great value, though we recommend saving up for the MSI MPG 271QRX if you can.

If you don’t mind the steep 1000R screen curvature, the Samsung Neo G7 is a great monitor for the price, while the Innocn 32M2V is an excellent flat-screen alternative.

In case you want a big-format gaming display, the LG OLED42C3 offers amazing value for the price, while the Samsung Neo G9 G95NA/G95NC, the LG 39GS95QE, the Corsair Xeneon Flex and the Samsung OLED G9 are worth considering if you want something extravagant.

Changelog +

  • May 3, 2024:
    – Added the LG 39GS95QE.
  • March 29, 2024:
    – Replaced the Dell AW2725DF with the MSI MPG 271QRX, and the Dell AW3225QF with the MSI MPG 321URX.
  • February 6, 2024:
    – Replaced the Acer X32FP with the Innocn 32M2V.
    – Added the Innocn 34M1R.
  • January 15, 2024:
    – Replaced the ASUS PG27AQDM with the Dell AW2725DF.
    – Added the Dell AW3225QF.
  • November 24, 2023:
    – Checked up on the guide to ensure that our picks are still the best options available.
  • October 30, 2023:
    – Added the AOC Q27G3XMN.
    – Added review summaries for the Samsung OLED G9 and Samsung G95NC monitors.
  • April 23, 2023:
    – Replaced the LG 27GR95QE with the ASUS PG27AQDM.
  • March 10, 2023:
    – Added the LG 27GR95QE, the Innocn 27M2V, the Acer X32FP, the AOC AG274QZM, and the Corsair Flex.
  • November 22, 2022:
    – Replaced the Dell Alienware AW3423DW with the AW3423DWF model.
  • November 9, 2022:
    – Removed the Sony Inzone M9.
    – Added the Cooler Master Tempest GP27U and GP27Q.
  • July 22, 2022:
    – Added the Samsung Odyssey Neo G7.
  • April 21, 2022:
    – Added the LG OLED42C2.
  • March 11, 2022:
    – Replaced the ASUS PG35VQ, PG27UQ and PG32UQX with the Dell AW3423DW.
  • February 1, 2022:
    – Included upcoming monitors announced at CES as alternatives where appropriate.
  • December 11, 2021:
    – Added review summaries for the monitors that were missing them.
  • November 24, 2021:
    – Checked up on the guide to ensure that our picks are still the best options available.
  • August 10, 2021:
    – Added the ASUS PG32UQX, the Samsung Neo G9, the LG OLED48C1, and the Acer XB323UGX to the table; dedicated review sections will be added soon.
    – Replaced the Philips 436M6 with Gigabyte FV43U, the Acer XB323UGP with ASUS PG329Q, the LG 27GN950 with LG 27GP950, the LG 38GN950 with Dell AW3821DW, and the LG 32UL500 with BenQ EW3270U.
  • December 15, 2020:
    – Added the Dell AW2721D and the Acer XB323UGP.
    – Removed the ASUS CG32UQ as it’s too expensive. The Samsung G7 is a much better option for the money.

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Rob Shafer

Rob is a software engineer with a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver. He now works full-time managing DisplayNinja while coding his own projects on the side.