The Best Gaming Monitors For PS5 And Xbox Series X (2024 Reviews)

Looking for a new monitor for the PS5 or the Xbox Series X? Check out the best deals and all the information you'll need here!

Need a new monitor for the PlayStation 5 or the Xbox Series X that will take advantage of your console’s mighty hardware?

In this guide, you’ll find the absolute best models currently available, as well as everything you need to know in order to pick the monitor that suits you most based on screen resolution, refresh rate, panel type, and more!

TypeMonitorSizeResolutionPanelRefresh Rate
Best 1080p 120Hz Gaming Monitor24”1920x1080IPS165Hz
Best 1440p 120Hz Gaming Monitors27”2560x1440IPS180Hz
32”2560x1440IPS170Hz
27”
32”
2560x1440VA240Hz
Best 4K 60Hz Gaming Monitors28”3840x2160IPS60Hz
32”3840x2160IPS60Hz
Best 4K 120Hz Gaming Monitors27”3840x2160IPS144Hz
32”3840x2160IPS144Hz
43”3840x2160VA144Hz
Best HDR Gaming Monitors42”
48”
3840x2160OLED120Hz
27”2560x1440*OLED240Hz
32”3840x2160OLED240Hz
27”3840x2160IPS160Hz
32”3840x2160VA165Hz
32”3840x2160IPS144Hz
*supports 4K 120Hz upscaling
budget pick

BenQ EX240

BenQ MOBIUZ EX240
  • Vibrant colors
  • Quick response time
  • 1080p 120Hz
best value

LG OLED42C3

LG OLED42C3
  • Infinite contrast ratio
  • Instantaneous response time
  • 4K HDR 120Hz + VRR
premium pick

Dell AW3225QF

Dell Alienware AW3225QF Monitor
  • Infinite contrast ratio
  • Instantaneous response time
  • 4K HDR 120Hz + VRR

To unleash the full power of the PS5 and the Xbox Series X/S, you’ll ideally want a monitor with an HDMI 2.1 port for 4K 120Hz support.

At the moment, there aren’t many HDMI 2.1 gaming monitors out there, but we will list the best models available as well as all the upcoming displays worth keeping an eye on!

Note that you will only be able to take full advantage of 120Hz at 4K UHD in a few games since the 4K resolution is quite demanding. So, research a bit about how your favorite games run at 1080p, 1440p and 4K resolution in order to ensure you’ll get the desired performance/frame rate.

There are other benefits of having an HDMI 2.1 monitor as well.

First of all, the display will be more future-proof for newer consoles – and second of all, it allows you to enjoy both 4K 60Hz in 60FPS games and 1080p/1440p 120Hz in less demanding 120FPS titles if you can’t run the game at 4K 120Hz.

Further, the PS5 only supports variable refresh rate over HDMI 2.1, whereas the Xbox Series X/S can utilize Adaptive-Sync over HDMI 2.0 and HDMI 1.4 for VRR as well.

If you want to view our changelogs for this particular buying guide, you can do so at the end of this article.

Best 1080p 120Hz Monitor

If you just want an affordable but good gaming monitor to take advantage of 120FPS for the smoothest performance in competitive titles, 1080p is the way to go and the BenQ EX240 offers exceptional performance and image quality for the price.

The Pros:

  • Accurate and rich colors
  • Height adjustable stand, USB hub
  • AMD FreeSync up to 165Hz
  • Fast pixel response time speed
  • Wide viewing angles

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

Keep in mind that not all 1080p 144Hz gaming monitors necessarily support the 1080p 120Hz mode on consoles.

Luckily, the BenQ EX240, which is among the most popular budget monitors for PC gaming, also supports 120Hz on the PS5 and Xbox consoles.

It offers vibrant colors and fast response time speed for an immersive and responsive gaming experience.

Image Quality

The monitor is based on a 23.8″ IPS (In-Plane Switching) panel. This technology offers 178° wide viewing angles, so the picture won’t shift in brightness, contrast, or color if you look at the screen at skewed angles.

Further, the BenQ EX240 features accurate, consistent and vibrant colors with ~115% sRGB color gamut size. Its static contrast ratio amounts to 1,100:1, which is standard for IPS panel monitors.

You won’t get as deep blacks as that of VA panels with a ~3,000:1 contrast ratio, but this panel technology has advantages of its own at this price range, such as a faster response time and more consistent colors.

Furthermore, the BenQ EX240 monitor has a decent 300-nit specified peak brightness, so the picture will be more than bright enough under normal lighting conditions.

Next, it has a quick pixel response time speed for minimal trailing visible behind fast-moving objects and low input lag of ~4ms, which makes for imperceptible delay.

Features

amd freesync logo

AMD FreeSync is supported with a 48-180Hz variable refresh rate (VRR) range, or 48-120Hz at 120Hz.

This technology allows the monitor to change its refresh rate dynamically, according to the frame rate generated by the GPU.

As a result, all screen tearing and stuttering are gone with no perceptible input lag introduced, which is the case with V-Sync.

Even when your FPS (Frames Per Second) drops below 48, AMD LFC (Low Framerate Compensation) kicks in with frame rate multiplication (47FPS -> 94Hz) to keep tearing at bay.

There’s also an MBR (Motion Blur Reduction) feature, which can reduce the amount of perceived motion blur by backlight strobing at the cost of image brightness.

However, MBR cannot be active at the same time as FreeSync on this monitor.

Other interesting features include Black eQualizer (improves visibility in darker games). Check out our BenQ EX240 review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

BenQ Mobiuz EX240 Review

The monitor also has a sturdy and ergonomic stand with up to 100mm height adjustment, +/- 15° swivel, -5°/15° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.2, a headphone jack, dual 2.5W integrated speakers and a dual-USB 3.0 hub. The 1080p 120Hz mode is supported for the PS5 and Xbox consoles.

Alternatives

The prices of these budget monitors often fluctuate, so feel free to leave us a comment below. We also have a list of all 24″ 1080p ~144Hz IPS monitors available.

Best 1440p 120Hz Gaming Monitors

Both the PS5 and the Xbox Series X/S support 1440p 120Hz natively, but not all 1440p 144Hz+ gaming monitors support the ‘1440p 120Hz’ mode. They might only support 120Hz at 1080p. Further, not all monitors that support 1440p 120Hz can simultaneously run FreeSync, so we’ve selected only the best options for you below.

The Pros:

  • Quick 1ms response time speed
  • Vibrant colors and wide viewing angles, high pixel density
  • 1440p 120Hz + FreeSync at the same time

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The Acer XV271U M3 is one of the most affordable 1440p 144Hz+ gaming monitors that supports the 1440p 120Hz mode on the Xbox Series X and Series S — and that can simultaneously run FreeSync for tear-free gameplay.

On top of that, it’s one of the most affordable 1440p 144Hz+ displays, making for an amazing value for money.

For the PS5, you just get 1440p 120Hz support, but this is a limitation of the console, not the monitor.

This is a popular PC gaming monitor thanks to its fast IPS panel with a 1ms GtG pixel response time speed for zero ghosting in fast-paced games.

The IPS panel also provides you with a wide 95% DCI-P3 color gamut for vibrant and saturated colors, as well as an sRGB emulation mode for better accuracy.

Other specifications include a 1,000:1 static contrast ratio and a 250-nit peak brightness, which is standard for IPS monitors at this price range.

Other interesting features of the monitor include Black Boost (for better visibility in dark areas of games), various pre-calibrated picture modes for different genres, an on-screen timer, crosshair overlays and a refresh rate tracker.

Design & Connectivity

Acer XV271U M3bmiiprx Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers height adjustment up to 120mm, tilt by -5°/25°, 360° swivel, +/- 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports (max 144Hz), a headphone jack and two 2W built-in speakers.

Alternatives

There are plenty of excellent 27″ 1440p high refresh rate IPS gaming monitors available nowadays ranging from $200 to $250 (depending on sale).

So, we recommend checking them all out and choosing whichever is the cheapest or according to your design/feature preference:

You can also get a 1440p 120Hz display below $200, such as the Koorui 27E6QC but it uses a curved VA panel with noticeable ghosting behind fast-moving objects, so it’s not recommended for fast-paced games.

The Pros:

  • Quick 1ms response time speed
  • Vibrant colors and wide viewing angles
  • 1440p 120Hz + FreeSync at the same time

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)
  • Design lacks pivot option

About The Monitor

The ASUS PG329Q is basically the 32″ version of the Acer XV271U M3, but with a wider color gamut and a higher brightness!

Image Quality

So, you get similar features and performance. However, since 1440p resolution is displayed on a larger 31.5-inch viewable screen, you get fewer pixels per inch.

This means that the image won’t be as crisp, but the bigger screen does provide a more immersive viewing experience. So, the choice between the two is entirely up to personal preference.

The ASUS PG329Q has a static contrast ratio of 1,000:1, a wide 99% Adobe RGB color gamut for gorgeous colors, a peak brightness of 400-nits (HDR content gets a small boost to 600-nits), 178° wide viewing angles and a rapid 1ms GtG response time speed.

Features

Besides FreeSync support, the ASUS PG329Q also supports ELMB-Sync, which allows for simultaneous VRR and MBR performance for tear-free gameplay with smoother motion clarity at a cost of picture brightness.

Other features include various picture presets, Shadow Boost, crosshair overlays and on-screen timers. Check out our ASUS PG329Q review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

ASUS ROG Swift PG329Q Monitor Back

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers height adjustment up to 100mm, swivel by +/- 25°, -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.2, two HDMI 2.0 ports, a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

There’s also a white model, the PG329Q-W.

Alternatives

  • Gigabyte M32Q – another popular 32″ 1440p 170Hz IPS model. It has a built-in KVM switch, but it has lower brightness, not as wide color gamut and minor overshoot at low frame rates when using VRR
  • Gigabyte M32QC – A cheaper 32″ 1440p 165Hz FreeSync gaming monitor with a curved VA panel; it has a higher contrast ratio, but slower response time speed

If you’re looking for something cheaper with an IPS panel, check out the Sceptre E325B-QPN168 (height-adjustable stand, 90% DCI-P3) and the Gigabyte GS32Q (tilt-only stand, 100% sRGB).

The Pros:

  • Quick 1ms response time speed
  • Vibrant colors, high contrast ratio, and strong peak brightness

The Cons:

  • The aggressive 1000R screen curvature won’t appeal to some gamers

About The Monitor

Unlike the Acer XV271U M3 and the ASUS PG329Q, the Samsung Odyssey G6 uses a curved VA panel with a higher contrast ratio for much deeper blacks.

It’s available in both 27″ and 32″ sized variants with identical specifications except for the screen size, and therefore, pixel-per-inch ratio.

Image Quality

Granted, you won’t be able to use the monitor’s full 240Hz refresh rate, but if you want a 1440p 120Hz gaming monitor with a VA panel and a fast response time speed, you don’t have any other options.

Samsung’s G6 displays are the only widescreen VA panel monitors with a 1ms GtG response time speed currently available, which allows them to provide inky and vivid blacks without any smearing in fast-paced games.

You can also use 1440p 120Hz and FreeSync at the same time with the Xbox Series X and Series S consoles.

The Samsung G6 can also accept a 4K UHD signal from the console as well as HDR, but in this case, you are limited to 60Hz without FreeSync.

Further, the G6 monitors have a high 600-nit peak brightness, a high 2,500:1 contrast ratio, a wide 90% DCI-P3 color gamut and 8 dimming zones, so there’s a meaningful improvement in HDR image quality.

You can choose between 1440p 120Hz + FreeSync in games where the frame rate is more important to you for a smoother performance, such as competitive FPS titles – and “4K” with HDR for the more graphically-oriented games for better image quality.

Now, the Odyssey G6 models feature integrated Tizen OS with smart features, such as Samsung TV Plus, Gaming Hub, Bixby, SmartThings, Microsoft 365, DeX, Bluetooth, WiFi and more. You also get a remote controller.

The Odyssey G7 models are the same monitors but without built-in smart features. Visit our Samsung Odyssey G7 review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

samsung c32g75t monitor

Note that the Samsung G6 monitors have a very steep 1000R screen curvature. Some users might not like it, some might love it, and some won’t give it much thought. Overall, the curvature is more pronounced on the 32″ model, but you get used to it.

The stand offers a good range of ergonomics including up to 120mm height adjustment, 90° pivot, -9°/13° tilt, +/- 15° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility. There’s also RGB lighting at the back and front of the monitor.

Connectivity options include two DisplayPort 1.4 inputs, one HDMI 2.0 port, a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

  • Innocn 27G1S – 27″ 1440p 240Hz model with a fast flat-screen VA panel

Best 4K 60Hz Gaming Monitors

If you don’t care about 120FPS and just want an enjoyable 4K experience at 30FPS or 60FPS, these are the best 4K 60Hz gaming monitors for the PS5 and the XSX.

The Pros:

  • Good response time speed
  • Vibrant colors and wide viewing angles, high pixel density
  • AMD FreeSync

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)
  • Tilt-only stand

About The Monitor

The MSI G281UV is an affordable 28″ 4K gaming monitor yet it features an IPS panel with wide viewing angles, a wide color gamut, and a quick response time speed!

On a 28″ screen, 4K resolution results in a very high pixel density of 157 PPI meaning that you’ll have crystal-clear details even if you’re sitting really close to the screen.

It also has a wide 95% DCI-P3 gamut coverage for rich and saturated colors, while the peak brightness is excellent at 400-nits; the contrast ratio is as expected from IPS technology and amounts to 1,000:1.

Useful gaming features include FreeSync support with a 40-60Hz VRR range over both DisplayPort and HDMI – allowing you to use it with the Xbox Series X/S.

You also get various picture presets, custom crosshair overlays, a refresh rate tracker, on-screen timers, and Night Vision (improves visibility in darker scenes of games).

Design & Connectivity

MSI G281UV Design

The stand of the monitor is tilt-only, but the screen is VESA mount compatible.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.2, two HDMI 2.0 inputs and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

  • ASUS VG289Q – another model based on the same panel. It has a fully ergonomic design, but goes for up to $80 more

The Pros:

  • Good response time speed
  • Vibrant colors and wide viewing angles, high pixel density
  • AMD FreeSync

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)
  • Tilt-only stand

About The Monitor

If you want a larger 4K 60Hz gaming monitor, we highly recommend the Sceptre U325W-UPT.

Image Quality

It’s the most affordable 32″ 4K IPS model that’s good and you don’t have to deal with narrow viewing angles or dark-level smearing caused by slow response time speed of VA panels.

The monitor has a wide 95% DCI-P3 color gamut, a peak brightness of 300-nits, a contrast ratio of 1,000:1 and a high 140 (PPI) pixel density.

Useful features include various picture presets, Black Level Equalizer and FreeSync with a 48-70Hz VRR range over both DP and HDMI.

Design & Connectivity

Sceptre U325W UPT Design

The Sceptre U325W-UPT monitor has a tilt-only stand but it’s VESA mount compatible via the 100x100mm pattern.

Connectivity options include two DisplayPort 1.4 inputs, two HDMI 2.0 inputs, a headphone jack and two 2W built-in speakers.

Alternatives

  • LG 32UL500 – a similarly priced 32″ 4K 60Hz monitor with a VA panel
  • Samsung M70B – a 32″ 4K 60Hz VA monitor with built-in smart features (Tizen OS, Microsoft 365, streaming apps, etc., no VRR support though)

If you’re looking for another 32″ 4K 60Hz IPS monitor, the LG 32UP83A is the next cheapest model available. It also has a USB-C port with 60W Power Delivery.

Best 4K 120Hz Gaming Monitors

Want the best of both worlds? Check out the best 4K 120Hz gaming monitors available with HDMI 2.1 connectivity!

The Pros:

  • Quick 1ms response time speed
  • Vibrant colors and wide viewing angles, high pixel density
  • 4K HDR 120Hz + FreeSync at the same time

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The MSI MAG274UPF is one of the most affordable 4K 144Hz gaming monitors with HDMI 2.1. It’s considerably cheaper than the alternatives, yet it doesn’t sacrifice anything crucial to achieve such as low price.

Image Quality

Besides providing you with 120Hz at 4K UHD for the PS5 and the Xbox Series X (and up to 144Hz over DisplayPort for PC), the MSI MAG274UPF also boasts exceptional image quality and buttery-smooth performance.

To start with, the monitor has a wide 98% DCI-P3 color gamut (~135% sRGB) and comes with a calibrated sRGB emulation mode.

Next, it has a high 400-nit peak brightness. Sadly, the contrast ratio is around 1,000:1, but this is expected from IPS technology, even at this price range.

Thanks to the rapid 1ms GtG pixel response time speed, there’s no visible ghosting behind fast-moving objects making it ideal for competitive first-person shooters.

Noteworthy features include crosshair overlays, Night Vision, various picture presets and the MPRT-Sync backlight strobing technology.

Design & Connectivity

MSI MAG274UPF Design

The design is robust and versatile with a good range of ergonomics, such as +/- 45° swivel, +/- 90° pivot, 130mm height adjustment, -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.1 inputs, DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode, 65W PD), a dual-USB 2.0 hub and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

NOTE

Keep in mind that the Acer XV275K P3 27″ 4K 160Hz IPS gaming monitor with a 576-zone mini LED FALD backlight can be found on sale for $550.

The Pros:

  • Quick 1ms response time speed
  • Vibrant colors and wide viewing angles, high pixel density
  • 4K HDR 120Hz + FreeSync at the same time
  • Ergonomic design and rich connectivity options

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)
  • Design lacks pivot option

About The Monitor

If you’re looking for a 32″ 4K 144Hz gaming monitor, the Dell G3223Q offers the best value for money, but there are a few things to keep in mind.

Image Quality

Dell’s monitor has only 8 dimming zones and it is edge-lit, so it’s not nearly as effective at improving the ‘dynamic range’ as some of the true mini LED FALD and OLED HDR displays we’ll get into next.

The G3223Q does have a 95% DCI-P3 wide color gamut for vibrant colors (with an available sRGB mode) and a strong 600-nit peak brightness.

It’s an overall great 32″ 4K 144Hz gaming monitor, but if you want good HDR image quality, you should check out true HDR displays below.

Other than that, the Dell G3223Q has a rapid 1ms GtG pixel response time speed and supports a variable refresh rate up to 144FPS for tear-free gameplay. Other features include Dark Stabilizer, on-screen timers, a refresh rate tracker and PiP/PbP support.

Design & Connectivity

Dell G3223Q Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers height adjustment up to 100mm, -5°/21° tilt, +/- 30° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports, a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub (1 upstream + 2 upstream).

The HDMI 2.1 ports are limited to 24 Gbps and rely on DSC for higher bandwidths, so you’re limited to 4K 120Hz 10-bit 4:2:0 on the PS5.

Alternatives

  • MSI MAG323UPF – Another 32″ 4K 160Hz IPS option with similar specs
  • Gigabyte M32UC and MSI G321CU – 32″ 4K 144Hz monitors with a curved VA panel. They’re more affordable, have a higher contrast ratio for deeper blacks, but have a slower response time speed and flawed VRR performance
  • LG 32GQ950 – LG’s model with an A-TW polarizer (helps with IPS glow) and a high 1000-nit peak brightness. However, it only has a few dimming zones, so the HDR experience is subpar. It goes for $800 – $1,300, so you can get a proper HDR display in this price range instead
  • LG 32GR93U – similar to the Dell G3223Q but with a lower 400-nit peak brightness

The Pros:

  • Vibrant colors, high contrast ratio, and strong peak brightness
  • 4K 120Hz + VRR, DisplayHDR 600
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 144Hz

The Cons:

  • Minor ghosting in fast-paced games, more so in darker scenes
  • Only 360 dimming zones

About The Monitor

If you want a large 43″ gaming monitor with HDMI 2.1, the 43″ Samsung Neo G7 is the best model available, that is, if you can find it at its ~$650 discounted price and don’t want an OLED display; otherwise, we recommend the C3 instead, which we’ll get into next.

Image Quality

4K UHD resolution looks incredibly crisp even on 43″ sized screens as you get a high pixel density of 103.67 PPI.

However, like most 43″ TVs, the Samsung S43CG70 uses a panel with a BGR subpixel layout. This can make text appear somewhat smudgy, but it’s not noticeable while gaming since you’ll be sitting far from the screen.

If you plan on using the monitor for PC or work too, the BGR layout might bother you a bit, but some people can tolerate it; sadly, there are no 43″ 4K monitors with a regular RGB layout.

The monitor has a high 700-nit peak brightness (450-nits for a full white window), a high 4000:1 contrast ratio, and a wide 95% DCI-P3 color gamut for vibrant and rich colors.

There are only 360 local dimming zones, so just how good the HDR image looks will depend on the scene.

Features

The GtG (gray-to-gray pixel transition) response time is slow, so some smearing will be noticeable in fast-paced games, more so in darker scenes. It’s also prone to VRR brightness flickering.

Further, the monitor has integrated Tizen OS with smart applications, such as DeX, Microsoft 365, Bixby, etc.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung S43CG70 Monitor Design

The Samsung S43CG70 features a sleek and sturdy design; it’s not ergonomic, but it is VESA mount compatible via the 200x200mm pattern.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 inputs, a dual-USB 3.0 hub, dual 20W integrated speakers, RJ45, WiFi and Bluetooth. You also get a remote controller.

Alternatives

  • Gigabyte FV43U – similarly priced 43″ 4K 144Hz gaming monitor. Even though it has DisplayHDR 1000 certification, the Neo G7 offers better image quality with HDR-600 due to its higher local dimming zone count. The FV43U does get a bit brighter, has a wider color gamut and a built-in KVM switch, but since it has only 8 dimming zones, HDR content won’t look as good.

If you’re mainly interested in HDR, we recommend the LG OLED42C3 mentioned below as it offers an infinite contrast ratio, rapid response time, better VRR performance, wider viewing angles and a wider color gamut.

The Samsung S43CG70 is a good alternative only if you’re too worried about the burn-in and lower brightness of OLED panels.

Best HDR Gaming Monitors

Looking for a monitor with proper HDR support for your console? Here are the best models available!

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio, wide color gamut, high peak brightness
  • No backlight bleed or IPS/VA glow
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 120Hz
  • Quick response time speed
  • HDMI 2.1, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Risk of permanent image burn-in and temporary image retention
  • Not as bright as some high-end LED-backlit TVs

About The TV

If you want the best HDR image quality and performance, you should definitely consider one of LG’s OLED TVs. The 42″ and 48″ LG OLED C3 TVs go on sale for as low as $800 – $900, making them one of the best value-for-money options.

Image Quality

As OLEDs are self-emissive, each pixel can be individually disabled, which makes for true blacks and basically infinite contrast ratio. What’s more, there’s no annoying backlight bleeding, glowing, or haloing!

While they can’t get quite as bright as the high-end mini LED displays, they can still achieve a decent 700-nit peak brightness for vivid highlights and an overall excellent HDR viewing experience. It has a low 180-nit sustainable brightness for 100% bright windows, so it’s not ideal for regular PC use, but a lot of users find it more than bright enough.

Further, they offer flawless viewing angles and a wide 98% DCI-P3 color gamut.

4K UHD resolution looks great even on 42″ sized screens, so the LG OLED42C3 is a popular pick for PC use too!

Another advantage of OLED technology is the instantaneous response time speed, which makes for zero ghosting in fast-paced games.

The C3 also has a high 120Hz refresh rate, low input lag and has both AMD’s FreeSync Premium and NVIDIA’s G-SYNC Compatible certifications for flawless VRR performance.

So, not only do you get incredible image quality but a responsive gaming experience as well!

The main downside is that you have to be careful about leaving the picture with bright static elements on the screen for too long since they can burn-in.

Also, note that LG’s W-OLED panels have an RWBG subpixel layout, so small text and fine details will have minor fringing noticeable, but this isn’t an issue in games and videos.

Design & Connectivity

LG OLED42C3 Design

As it is a TV, the C3 has no ergonomics, but it boasts an extremely slim design and it is VESA mount compatible via the 300x200mm pattern.

Connectivity options include four HDMI 2.1 ports, three USB ports, Ethernet, a tuner, composite-in, both analog and digital audio jacks and WiFi.

Alternatives

  • ASUS PG42UQ – a 42″ 4K 120Hz monitor based on the same panel. It can get a bit brighter thanks to its heatsink and it’s overclockable to 138Hz. Further, it uses a matte anti-glare coating that’s better at handling reflections than the glossy surface of LG’s TVs, but it also adds a bit of graininess to the image. However, it doesn’t have any smart features nor Dolby Vision support yet it goes for $1,400. The KTC G42P5 is another alternative with a matte anti-glare coating at ~$1,100.

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio, wide color gamut, high peak brightness
  • No backlight bleed or IPS/VA glow
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 240Hz
  • Instantaneous response time speed
  • HDMI 2.1, USB hub
  • 2-year burn-in warranty

The Cons:

  • Risk of permanent image burn-in and temporary image retention
  • Not as bright as some high-end LED-backlit TVs

About The Monitor

In case you want a smaller OLED gaming monitor, the LG 27GR95QE is for you!

Image Quality

While this monitor has a screen resolution of 2560×1440 and a 240Hz refresh rate, it can actually upscale to 4K 120Hz, making it a great pick for console gamers. It also has an HDMI 2.1 port with VRR support for the PS5 as well as Xbox consoles.

The 27GR95QE delivers a similar viewing experience as that of LG’s C3 TVs thanks to its wide viewing angles, wide 98% DCI-P3 color gamut, instant response times, infinite contrast ratio and a decent peak brightness of 200-nits for SDR and up to ~650-nits for small HDR highlights.

Besides VRR support, the monitor has hardware calibration, Black Stabilizer, a refresh rate tracker, crosshair overlays and various picture presets. Check out our full LG 27GR95QE review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

LG 27GR95QE Design

The design is robust with up to 110mm height adjustment, -5°/15° tilt, +/- 10° swivel, 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility. It also comes with a remote controller and has RGB lighting at the back.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.1 ports, DP 1.4 with DSC, a dual-USB 3.0 hub, a digital audio output and a DTS headphone jack with HP:X support for 3D audio simulation.

Alternatives

There are 8 monitors using the same panel with different design, features, connectivity options, warranty and pricing.

You can see how they compare in the table below.

 LG 27GR95QE*ASUS PG27AQDMCorsair 27QHD240Acer X27UAOC AG276QZDCooler Master GZ2711KTC G27P6
Max. SDR Brightness (100% White Window, Uniform Brightness Enabled)200-nits250-nits160-nits200-nits260-nitsNot Tested200-nits
Max. HDR Brightness (100% White Window)140-nits160-nits140-nits230-nits140-nitsNot Tested200-nits
Max. HDR Brightness (10% White Window)650-nits850-nits650-nits650-nits650-nitsNot Tested750-nits
Max. HDR Brightness (≤3% White Window)  600-nits900-nits750-nits750-nits700-nitsNot Tested900-nits
USA Burn-in Warranty (can vary by region)2-year2-year3-yearNone3-year?None
Display Inputs1x DP 1.4
2x HDMI 2.1 (48 Gbps)
1x DP 1.4
2x HDMI 2.0
1x DP 1.4
2x HDMI 2.1 (24 Gbps)
1x DP 1.4
2x HDMI 2.0
2x DP 1.4
2x HDMI 2.0
1x DP 1.4
2x HDMI 2.1 (Gbps?)
1x DP 1.4
2x HDMI 2.0
USB-C (DP Alt Mode + Power Delivery)NoNo65W90WNo90W65W
USB Ports2x USB-A
1x USB-B
2x USB-A
1x USB-B
4x USB-A
1x USB-C
2x USB-A
1x USB-B
2x USB-A
1x USB-B
2x USB-A
1x USB-B
2x USB-A
1x USB-B
KVMNoNoYesYesNo?Yes
Audio Ports1x HP + Mic
1x Optical Digital
1x HP1x HP1x HP1x HP
2x5W Speakers
1x HP
2x3W Speakers
1x HP
2x3W Speakers
PS5 SupportFull
(4K HDR + 120Hz VRR)
1440p HDR + 120Hz VRR
or
4K HDR + 60Hz VRR
Full (with chroma)
4K HDR 4:2:0 + 120Hz VRR
1440p HDR + 120Hz VRR
or
4K HDR + 60Hz VRR
1440p HDR + 120Hz VRR
or
4K HDR + 60Hz VRR
Not Tested1440p HDR + 120Hz
or
4K HDR + 60Hz
Xbox Series X/S SupportFull
(4K HDR + 120Hz VRR)
4K HDR + 60Hz VRR
or
1440p SDR + 120Hz VRR
Full
(4K HDR + 120Hz VRR)
4K HDR + 60Hz VRR
or
1440p SDR + 120Hz VRR
4K HDR + 60Hz VRR
or
1440p SDR + 120Hz VRR
Not Tested4K HDR + 60Hz
or
1440p SDR + 120Hz
Other+ Hardware Calibration+ PiP/PbP– Requires manual swapping between SDR and HDR modes+ PiP/PbP
 Price / ReviewLG 27GR95QEASUS PG27AQDMCorsair 27QHD240Acer X27UAOC AG276QZDN/AKTC G27P6
*The newer LG 27GS95QE model is available with a higher 275-nit 100% White Window brightness specified. It has not been tested yet though.

For console gaming, the LG 27GR95QE is the best option since it supports 4K 120Hz upscaling and full 48Gbps HDMI 2.1. It can also be found at a good price and has a decent 2-year warranty.

The newer 27GS95QE model is supposed to be the same display but with a higher brightness, but it’s yet to be tested.

You should also consider the Dell Alienware AW2725DF. It has a higher 360Hz refresh rate, which is not a bonus unless you also have a PC, but its QD-OLED panel has a higher color volume for more vibrant colors.

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio, wide color gamut, high peak brightness
  • No backlight bleed or IPS/VA glow
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 240Hz
  • Quick response time speed
  • HDMI 2.1, USB hub
  • 3-year burn-in warranty

The Cons:

  • Risk of permanent image burn-in and temporary image retention
  • Not as bright as some high-end LED-backlit TVs

About The Monitor

The Dell AW3225QF is currently the best 32″ gaming monitor available!

Image Quality

Just like there are no 1440 120Hz OLED displays, forcing you to get a 1440p 240Hz model, there are no 32″ 4K 120Hz OLED gaming monitors. So, if you want the best 32″ OLED display, you should get the Dell AW3225QF with a 240Hz refresh rate!

Unlike the LG C3 and the LG 27GR95QE which use LG’s W-OLED panels, the Dell AW3225QF has Samsung’s QD-OLED panel with a higher color volume and a wider 99.3% DCI-P3 color gamut, resulting in more saturated and brighter colors.

It also has excellent brightness performance with 250-nits peak for a 100% white window and up to 1000-nits for small HDR highlights.

The Dell Alienware AW3225QF is factory-calibrated at Delta < 2, supports VRR, and even supports Dolby Vision in addition to the standard HDR10 format. You also get the standard gaming features (crosshairs, on-screen timers, a refresh rate tracker, etc.).

Be sure to check out our full Dell Alienware AW3225QF review for more details.

Design & Connectivity

Dell Alienware AW3225QF Monitor Design

The stand offers height adjustment up to 110mm, -5°/21° tilt, +/- 20° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

The screen also has a moderate 1700R curvature for added immersion.

Connectivity options include DP 1.4, two HDMI 2.1 ports (one with eARC support for Dolby Atmos), three downstream USB-A ports, a USB-C port with 15W Power Delivery and an upstream USB-B port.

Alternatives

In Q1 2024, other manufacturers are going to release various 32″ 4K 240Hz QD-OLED flat-screen models as well. Additionally, in Q3 2024, ASUS and LG plan to release a 32″ 4K 240Hz W-OLED monitor with 1080p 480Hz Dual Mode.

The ASUS PG32UCDM is available with a 32″ 4K 240Hz flat-screen QD-OLED panel, USB-C with 90W PD, KVM and BFI up to 120Hz, but it’s $100 more expensive than the Dell AW3225QF.

There’s also the MSI MPG 321URX based on the same panel as the PG32UCDM. It has USB-C 90W PD and KVM, but no BFI. It in the US, it can be found for just $950 though.

The Pros:

  • High peak brightness, high pixel density, wide color gamut
  • 1152-zone mini LED FALD
  • Quick response time, low input lag
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 144FPS
  • Fully ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options, including KVM and USB-C with 90W PD

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes

About The Monitor

The Innocn 27M2V offers a true HDR viewing experience thanks to its 1152-zone mini LED FALD.

Image Quality

To start with, the Innocn 27M2V is based on a 27″ IPS panel with a wide 99% DCI-P3 and 99% Adobe RGB color gamut for vibrant colors.

Next, it has a strong 1200-nit peak brightness for punchy HDR highlights, while its 1152-zone full-array local dimming solution further improves the contrast ratio by dimming parts of the image that are supposed to be dark without greatly affecting the parts that are supposed to remain bright.

So, if you don’t want to deal with OLED’s limited brightness and risk of burn-in, mini LED is the way to go for HDR content. However, you note that in some demanding scenes (fireworks, stars in a night sky), the light from small objects bleeds into the surrounding dimmed zones and crates blooming.

As for the performance, the Innocn 27M2V has a rapid 1ms GtG response time speed for zero ghosting in fast-paced games.

Noteworthy features include crosshair overlays, Shadow Balance and various picture presets.

Check out our full Innocn 27M2V review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Innocn 27M2V Design

The monitor offers height adjustment up to 120mm, 15° tilt, +/- 15° swivel, 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.1 ports, DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode and 90W PD), 1 upstream + 2 downstream USB 3.0 ports, a headphone jack, dual 5W integrated speakers and built-in KVM.

Alternatives

  • Redmagic GM001J – uses the same panel and 1152-zone mini LED FALD backlight

In case the Innocn and Redmagic models are not available in your region, check out the Cooler Master Tempest GP27U or the Acer XV275K P3, though they have fewer dimming zones (576).

The Cooler Master Tempest GP27Q is a cheaper 1440p version of the GP27U model with the same 576-zone mini LED FALD backlight. However, because it doesn’t have HDMI 2.1, you won’t get VRR support on the PS5, while on the Xbox consoles, you will have to choose between 1440p 120Hz with FreeSync or 4K 60Hz with HDR. The same goes for the AOC Q27G3XMN with a 27″ 1440p 180Hz VA 336-zone panel.

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio and pixel density
  • Wide color gamut
  • High peak brightness, 1196-zone mini LED FALD
  • Quick response time
  • Plenty of features, including VRR and MBR up to 165Hz
  • Fully ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming (in very demanding scenes)
  • The aggressive 1000R screen curvature won’t appeal to some gamers
  • VRR performance not ideal

About The Monitor

If you want a larger mini LED display for HDR content, the 32″ Samsung Neo G7 is the best option available given that you don’t mind its aggressive 1000R screen curvature.

Image Quality

The Neo G7 has an 1196-zone mini LED FALD backlight and a peak brightness of 1,200-nits, which allows for an amazing HDR viewing experience with bright highlights.

While it is brighter than OLED displays, its VA panel has a static contrast ratio of ~4,000:1, so you won’t get as deep blacks as that of OLEDs, and some blooming will be noticeable in demanding scenes (such as night sky, fireworks, etc.).

Moving on, it has a rapid 1ms GtG pixel response time speed, supports VRR up to 165FPS for tear-free gameplay and a wide 95% DCI-P3 color gamut.

In some games, VRR brightness flickering can be noticeable, but you can use Samsung’s VRR Control option to prevent this issue – sadly, this introduces micro-stuttering instead.

Check out our full Samsung Neo G7 review for more details.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung S32BG75 Review

The Neo G7 has an ergonomic stand with up to 120mm height adjustment, +/- 15° swivel, 90° pivot, -9°/13° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DP 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports with 40 Gbps and DSC, a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

The screen has a steep 1000R curvature that some users don’t find appealing, some like it and some just get used to it over time.

The Pros:

  • High pixel density
  • Accurate and vibrant colors
  • Plenty of features including VRR up to 144Hz, PiP/PbP
  • Fully ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options, including USB-C with 90W PD

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)
  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes with local dimming

About The Monitor

Want a 32″ 4K high refresh rate HDR display with a flat-screen? We recommend the Innocn 32M2V!

Image Quality

The Innocn 32M2V uses an IPS panel with an 1152-zone mini LED FALD, so it will have more noticeable blooming than the Samsung Neo G7.

However, Innocn 32M2V also has a wider color gamut with 99% Adobe RGB coverage, wider viewing angles and smoother VRR performance!

So, the choice between the two models will mainly come down to what you personally prefer. Both models have a rapid response time speed and a high ~1200-nit peak brightness.

Check out our full Innocn 32M2V review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Innocn 27M2V Design

The stand is sturdy and offers height adjustment up to 80mm, +/- 25° swivel, -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.1 ports with full 48 Gbps bandwidth, DP 1.4 with DSC, USB-C with DP Alt Mode and 90W PD, two 5W built-in speakers, a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

  • Innocn 32A6V – the same monitor with a darker design
  • Acer Predator X32FP – has a bit faster response time, but fewer dimming zones (576) and it’s also more expensive (~$1200)

There’s also the ASUS PG32UQXR model with the same panel and 576-zone FALD as the Acer X32FP. ASUS’ model has DisplayPort 2.1, but lacks USB-C and KVM yet goes for up to $300 more. Additionally, DP 2.1 is not necessary as the DP 1.4 port on the Acer X32FP can deliver the full 4K 160Hz experience via virtually lossless compression (DSC).

Buyer’s Guide – How To Pick The Right Console Gaming Monitor

BenQ EX2710 Console Gaming Monitor

Based on the reviews above, make sure you pick the best monitor for you based on your budget and personal preference regarding screen size, panel type, refresh rate, and resolution.

You also need to take into account whether your favorite games support 120FPS if you want to benefit from 120Hz. Here’s a list of supported games, as well as some additional information you might find useful.

How To Change The Refresh Rate To 120Hz

If you are having trouble selecting 120Hz on your console, try adjusting the following settings:

For Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S:

Under Profile & System, go to Settings -> General -> TV & display options -> Video fidelity & overscan -> Connection. Now, change Auto-detect (Recommended) to HDMI. Go back to TV & display options, and select 120Hz.

To actually see the benefits of 120Hz, you’ll need to play games that support the 120FPS mode including:

  • Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War, Vanguard, Warzone
  • Devil May Cry 5 Special Edition
  • Dirt 5
  • ExoMecha
  • Gears 5 (Multiplayer)
  • Halo Infinite (Multiplayer)
  • Halo: The Master Chief Collection
  • Metal: Hellsinger
  • Monster Boy and the Cursed Kingdom
  • Ori and the Will of the Wisps
  • Orphan of the Machine
  • Rainbow Six Siege
  • Second Extinction
  • The Falconeer
  • The Touryst
  • Fortnite
  • Overwatch
  • Full list

For PlayStation 5:

Settings -> Saved Data and Game/App Settings -> Game Presets. Now, change Performance Mode or Resolution Mode to Performance Mode.

Next, you’ll need to enable the 120FPS/Hz mode in the video game settings. Note that not all PS5 games support this mode – here are some supported titles:

  • Borderlands 3
  • Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War
  • Call of Duty: Vanguard
  • Call of Duty: Warzone
  • Destiny 2
  • Devil May Cry 5: Special Edition
  • DIRT 5
  • Doom Eternal
  • F1 2021
  • Ghost Runner
  • Knockout City
  • Quake
  • Rocket League
  • Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 1, 2
  • WRC 9
  • Rogue Company
  • Monster Boy and the Cursed Kingdom
  • The Nioh Collection
  • Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six: Siege
  • Fortnite

Conclusion

These are the best monitors for PS5 and the Xbox Series X/Series S available at the moment! For 1080p 120Hz, the BenQ EX240 is an excellent pick for both consoles.

When it comes to 1440p 120Hz, we recommend the Acer XV271U M3, the ASUS PG329Q or the Samsung Odyssey G6 models – depending on your budget and personal preference.

In case you want to enjoy both 4K UHD and 120Hz, we recommend going with the LG OLED C3 due to its exceptional value for money.

If you want something smaller, the LG 27GR95QE, the Neo G7, the Dell AW3225QF and the Innocn 32M2V all offer excellent HDR image quality and smooth performance.

Updates +

  • February 8, 2024:
    – Replaced the Acer XV272UV with XV271UM3, the Gigabyte M27U with the MSI MAG274UPF and the Acer X32FP with the Innocn 32M2V.
    – Added the Dell AW3225QF review summary.
  • November 24, 2023:
    – Checked up on the guide to ensure that our picks are still the best options available.
  • November 5, 2023:
    – Replaced the Gigabyte M32Q with the ASUS PG329Q, the ASUS VG289Q with the MSI G281UV, the Acer XB283KKV with the Gigabyte M27U, and the LG 32UN650 with the Sceptre U325W-UPT.
  • May 17, 2023:
    – Replaced the AOC FV43U with the Samsung S43CG70.
  • March 20, 2023:
    – Replaced the AOC 24G2 with the Gigabyte G24F2, the Samsung Odyssey G7 with G6.
    – Added the LG 27GR95QE, the Innocn 27M2V and the Acer X32FP.
    – Added a dedicated HDR category.
  • November 22, 2022:
    – Checked up on the guide to ensure that our picks are still the best options available.
  • November 9, 2022:
    – Replaced the LG 27GP83A with the Acer XV272UV, the LG 32GP83A with the Gigabyte M32Q, and the Sony Inzone M9 with the Cooler Master Tempest GP27U.
  • September 20, 2022:
    – Edited the buyer’s guide now that the PS5 supports 1440p 120Hz and 1440p 60Hz modes.
  • July 5, 2022:
    – Replaced the LG 27GP950 with the Sony Inzone M9.
    – Replaced the Gigabyte M32U and the MSI MPG321UR-QD with the Dell G3223Q.
  • February 8, 2022:
    – Replaced the Gigbyte M28U with the Acer XB283K.
    – Replaced the BenQ EX2510 with the AOC 24G2.
  • November 25, 2021:
    – Checked up on the guide to ensure that our picks are still the best options available.
  • November 16, 2021:
    – Added the MSI MPG321UR-QD.

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Rob Shafer

Rob is a software engineer with a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver. He now works full-time managing DisplayNinja while coding his own projects on the side.