The Best 32-Inch Monitors (2024 Reviews)

Looking for a 32-inch monitor? Check out all the best models currently available with various specs including 144Hz, 4K, 1440p, curved and more.

So, you want a large monitor for gaming, videos, work, or everyday use, but you’re not sure which model to opt for or what specifications are the right ones for you?

We can help you out with that!

In this buying guide, you’ll find all the best 32-inch monitors currently available as well as everything you need to look out for when purchasing a display of this size!

TypeMonitorPanelResolutionRefresh
Rate
 
Best 32-inch
Budget Monitors
IPS1920x108060Hz
VA1920x1080100Hz
IPS2560x144075Hz
Best 32-inch
4K 60Hz Monitors
IPS3840x216070Hz
VA3840x216060Hz
Best 32-inch
1440p 144Hz
Gaming Monitors
VA2560x1440170Hz
VA2560x1440165Hz
IPS2560x1440144Hz
Best 32-inch
1440p 240Hz
Gaming Monitors
VA2560x1440240Hz
IPS2560x1440260Hz
Best 32-inch
4K 144Hz
Gaming Monitors
VA3840x2160144Hz
IPS3840x2160160Hz
Best 32-inch
HDR Monitors
VA3840x2160165Hz
IPS3840x2160144Hz
OLED3840x2160240Hz
OLED3840x21604K 240Hz,
1080p 480Hz
Best 32-inch
Professional Monitors
IPS
Black
3840x216060Hz
OLED3840x216060Hz
premium pick

MSI MPG 321URX

MSI MPG 321URX Monitor
  • 4K 240Hz
  • Infinite contrast, instant response times
  • USB-C / KVM
best value

Gigabyte M32QC

Gigabyte M32QC Monitor
  • 1440p 170Hz
  • Wide color gamut
  • Ergonomic stand, KVM
budget pick

LG 32MR50C

LG 32MR50C
  • Affordable
  • 100Hz
  • High contrast ratio

If you want to view our changelogs for this particular buying guide, you can do so at the end of this article.

Best Budget 32-inch Monitors

Keep in mind that 32″ monitors with 1920×1080 resolution have a rather low pixel-per-inch ratio (pixel density) which causes the picture quality to be pixelated. So, we don’t recommend this combination for regular desktop use.

However, when looking at the screen from a distance, the individual pixels won’t be as noticeable. So, if you just want a big monitor for console gaming, watching videos and similar use, 32″ 1080p monitors can be useful for that.

The Pros:

  • Precise, consistent and vibrant colors
  • HDR support with wide color gamut
  • Wide viewing angles

The Cons:

  • Not ideal for regular desktop use due to low pixel density
  • No AMD FreeSync
  • Tilt-only stand
  • Stand prone to breaking
  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The LG 32ML600M is one of the most budget-friendly 32″ 1080p monitors you can get, yet it features an IPS panel for wide viewing angles and entry-level HDR support with a wide color gamut!

Image Quality

Now, let’s make something perfectly clear right away — this monitor won’t provide you with an eye-catching HDR viewing experience that you’d get with a much more expensive monitor or TV.

Here’s the deal: the LG 32ML600M can accept the HDR10 signal and display it. Nevertheless, for a ‘true’ HDR viewing experience, it would need a significantly higher peak brightness, a higher contrast ratio and local dimming.

Even so, it’s not one of the ‘fake’ HDR monitors either as it has a wide 95% DCI-P3 color gamut, which will provide you with more vibrant and lifelike colors.

On the other hand, since it has an IPS panel, the colors will be consistent across the entire screen, and thanks to the wide 178° viewing angles, the picture won’t change in color, contrast, or brightness when you look at the monitor off-axis.

Further, it has a peak brightness of only 300-nits, so it doesn’t qualify for VESA’s entry-level DisplayHDR 400 certification, but due to its wide color gamut support, it actually offers a better HDR picture than certain HDR400-certified screens.

Next, the LG 32ML600M has a static contrast ratio of 1,200:1. It may not have as deep blacks as that of VA panel monitors, but it is actually better than most IPS monitors at this (or even higher) price range when it comes to contrast.

Lastly, the monitor has a quick pixel response time speed and low input lag, so it’s great for console gaming as you’ll get no prominent motion blur or perceptible delays.

Features

LG packs a bunch of useful features in their monitors, and the 32ML600M is no exception.

This means you’ll find their standard features such as On-Screen Control and Screen Split, allowing you to adjust the monitor’s settings in a desktop application and to split the screen into different layouts for easier multitasking.

Additionally, there are customizable crosshair overlays for FPS games and Black Stabilizer, which improves the visibility of objects in shadows by altering the gamma curvature.

Design & Connectivity

lg 32ml600m back

The tilt-only stand of the monitor is the only thing we hold against it, as many users have reported that it breaks easily. So, we recommend getting any budget third-party monitor stand just to be sure.

Other than that, the LG 32ML600M has reasonably thick bezels, a low-haze anti-glare coating that eliminates reflections but preserves the picture quality and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 1.4 ports, VGA and a headphone jack.

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio
  • 100Hz refresh rate
  • Plenty of features, including AMD FreeSync

The Cons:

  • Not ideal for regular desktop use due to low pixel density
  • No DisplayPort input
  • Tilt-only stand

About The Monitor

If you’d rather have a 32″ 1080p monitor with a curved screen and/or a VA panel, the LG 32MR50C is the most affordable option yet it also has a high 100Hz refresh rate!

Image Quality

The LG 32MR50C uses a VA panel with a steep 1000R curvature for added immersion. Further, it has a high 3,000:1 contrast ratio, which results in noticeably deeper blacks as opposed to that of IPS panels.

However, the LG 32MR50C doesn’t have as wide viewing angles as IPS panels. It also doesn’t have quite as high brightness (250-nits) nor as wide color gamut as the LG 32ML600M, so while blacks are deeper on the 32MR50C, the colors are more vibrant on the 32ML600M.

The LG 32MR50C has one more advantage though, which is the 100Hz refresh rate that provides you with noticeably smoother motion. In fact, we find that the difference between 100Hz and 60-75Hz is more noticeable than the difference between 100Hz and 144Hz.

It also supports variable refresh rate for tear-free gameplay up to 100Hz, however, since it doesn’t have a DisplayPort input (or HDMI 2.1), VRR only works with AMD Radeon cards.

Design & Connectivity

LG 32MR50C Design

The stand of the monitor is tilt-only, but the screen is VESA mount compatible via the 100x100mm pattern.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 1.4 ports, VGA and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

You should also consider the Samsung M50C – it’s a 32″ 1080p monitor with a VA panel and built-in smart features. We’ll cover these smart models a bit further down the article.

The Pros:

  • Precise and consistent colors
  • Wide viewing angles
  • AMD FreeSync up to 75Hz
  • Crisp image quality

The Cons:

  • Tilt-only stand
  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

Looking for a 32″ 1440p monitor with consistent and accurate colors as well as wide viewing angles? The LG 32QN600 is by far the most affordable option.

Image Quality

With the WQHD resolution of 2560×1440 pixels, the image quality becomes much sharper on 32″ sized monitors.

Simply put, you get a pixel density of around 93 PPI which is equivalent to 1080p on 24″ monitors in terms of sharpness and clarity, but you also get a much bigger screen!

The LG 32QN600 is based on an IPS panel with a 1,000:1 contrast ratio, a 350-nit peak brightness and ~99% sRGB color gamut with 10-bit depth support for 1.07 billion colors!

In other words, you get a bright picture quality with vivid colors that will remain perfect at basically any angle. The monitor is also fit for entry-level color-critical work after proper calibration.

Next, the LG 32QN600 has a quick 5ms response time speed, so there will be no visible smearing or motion blur in fast-paced games. Alas, it is limited to 75Hz.

Features

The LG 32QN600 offers Black Equalizer, various pre-calibrated picture presets and AMD FreeSync (48-75Hz VRR range). It also supports HDR, but it’s only software-emulated due to a lack of wide color gamut and local dimming, among other things.

Design & Connectivity

LG 32QN600 Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is tilt-only, but you can mount the screen via the 100x100mm VESA pattern. Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.2, two HDMI 1.4 ports and a headphone jack.

The Pros:

  • Wide color gamut and viewing angles
  • High pixel density
  • Plenty of extra features including VRR up to 70Hz

The Cons:

  • Tilt-only stand
  • Inferior contrast ratio to that of VA panel monitors

About The Monitor

4K UHD resolution looks significantly sharper on 32-inch monitors as opposed to 1440p, but it’s also a lot more demanding to drive when it comes to PC gaming.

The Sceptre U325W-UPT is the only 32″ 4K IPS monitor available for under $250 yet it features a 70Hz refresh rate and a wide color gamut.

This makes it a great pick for gaming, everyday use, and basic content creation.

Image Quality

For most people, 4K resolution is ideal for 32-inch monitors. You get a rich pixel density of 140 PPI, so everything will be crystal-clear, and you’ll have plenty of screen space available!

While some users don’t use any scaling at this pixel density, and others prefer at least a 125% scale, one thing’s for sure, you’ll get clear and vivid details.

Based on an IPS panel, the Sceptre U325W has wide viewing angles for perfect image quality regardless of the angle you’re looking at the screen. It also has a faster pixel response time speed, so you won’t get dark smearing behind fast-moving objects in darker scenes.

A wide color gamut is supported as well with ~95% DCI-P3 (~138% sRGB) gamut coverage, resulting in more saturated and vibrant colors. Other specifications include a 300-nit peak brightness and a 1,000:1 static contrast ratio.

Features

The Sceptre U325W-UPT supports variable refresh rate up to 70Hz for tear-free gameplay. The extra 10Hz also provides you with a small but noticeable boost in motion clarity.

Other features include Black Level Equalizer, various picture modes and advanced image adjustment settings, including gamma and hue/saturation.

Design & Connectivity

Sceptre U325W UPT Design

The design of the monitor features ultra-thin bezels, while the stand is tilt-only (-5°/15°). The screen is 100x100mm VESA mount compatible and has three LED strips at the rear.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 inputs, two DisplayPort 1.4 inputs, a headphone jack and two 2W built-in speakers.

Alternatives

  • LG 32UN500, 32UL500 – 32″ 4K 60Hz monitors with a VA panel, offering a bit higher contrast ratio for deeper blacks, but not quite as wide viewing angles
  • Philips 328E1CA – 32″ 4K 60Hz monitor with a curved VA panel
  • LG 32UP83A – a 32″ 4K 60Hz IPS monitor with a USB-C port (60W PD)

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio
  • Built-in smart features
  • USB-C with DP Alt Mode and 65W PD

The Cons:

  • No variable refresh rate
  • Tilt-only stand

About The Monitor

If you want a monitor/TV combo, the Samsung M70B offers excellent value for money.

Image Quality

The Samsung S32BM70 is a 32″ 4K monitor based on a VA panel, delivering a high 3,000:1 static contrast ratio for deep blacks. It also has a decent 300-nit peak brightness, basic HDR10 support and a ~90% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage.

It features Samsung’s Tizen OS and plenty of smart features, including Microsoft 365, DeX, Apple Airplay 2, streaming apps, voice assistance, Samsung TV+ and more!

Design & Connectivity

Samsung M70B Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is tilt-only, but it’s VESA mount compatible. The monitor also comes with a remote controller, WiFi and Bluetooth support.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, a USB-C port with DisplayPort Alternate Mode and 65W Power Delivery, allowing you to charge a compatible laptop, three downstream USB-A ports, integrated speakers and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

  • LG 32SQ730S – LG’s smart monitor based on the same panel with WebOS instead of Tizen. It has a height adjustable stand, RJ45 and VRR support, but it can be up to $100 more expensive.
  • Samsung M80C – Based on the same panel as the M70B, but features an ergonomic stand and a built-in webcam. Its price goes up to $700 though.
  • Samsung M50C – a 32″ smart model with 1920×1080 resolution

Best 32-inch 1440p 144Hz Gaming Monitors

For most gamers, 1440p and 144Hz are the perfect combination.

Here’s why: you get a significant boost in motion clarity and responsiveness thanks to the high refresh rate while 1440p is not nearly as demanding as 4K, but still provides a crisp image quality. 

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio, wide color gamut
  • MBR + FreeSync up to 170Hz
  • Crisp image quality
  • Height-adjustable stand, KVM switch

The Cons:

  • Minor smearing in fast-paced games, mainly in darker scenes
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

The Gigabyte M32QC is the most cost-effective 32″ 1440p high refresh rate gaming monitor with a curved VA panel.

Image Quality

The monitor’s high static contrast ratio of 3,000:1 will still provide you with an appealing picture quality with deep blacks and vivid details. At the same time, its peak brightness of 400-nits will be plenty under normal lighting conditions.

But that’s not all, the M32QC has a wide 94% DCI-P3 color gamut (~125% sRGB), so the colors will be quite vibrant!

When it comes to gaming performance, the Gigabyte M32QC has some noticeable ghosting in dark scenes of fast-paced games, but its high 165Hz refresh rate makes for a responsive gaming experience.

Most gamers, except those who are highly competitive or extremely sensitive to smearing, will find the amount of ghosting tolerable.

AMD FreeSync is supported as well, with some units exhibiting brightness flickering with fluctuating frame rates. Alternatively, you can use the Aim Stabilizer-Sync MBR technology for less motion blur.

Features

Besides FreeSync and MBR, the Gigabyte M32QC offers standard gaming features such as Black Equalizer, pre-calibrated picture presets and custom crosshairs.

It also supports Picture in Picture and Picture by Picture, and the exclusive Dashboard feature, which allows you to display various system parameters (GPU/CPU temperature, fan speed, etc.) on the screen.

Design & Connectivity

Gigabyte M32QC Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 100mm, -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility while the screen has a steep 1500R curvature.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.2, two HDMI 2.0 ports, USB-C (DP Alt Mode, 18W PD), an audio line-out port for headphones or external speakers and a dual-USB 3.0 hub. There’s also a built-in KVM switch.

Alternatives​

  • Gigabyte G32QCA – an older version of this monitor without KVM and USB-C, usually goes for the same price
  • Gigabyte GS32QC – a newer version, but it has a tilt-only stand and no wide color gamut support yet it goes for the same price when the G32QCA/M32QC are on sale
  • Koorui GA01, Acer EI322QURP – more affordable 32″ 1440p high refresh rate curved VA models that can be found for ~$230. They’re good options if you can’t find the Gigabyte M32QC on sale

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio
  • MBR and FreeSync up to 165Hz
  • Crisp image quality

The Cons:

  • Minor smearing in fast-paced games, mainly in darker scenes
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

Do you prefer flat screens at this screen size? In that case, we recommend the LG 32GN650.

Image Quality

Unlike the Gigabyte M32QC, the LG 32GN650 doesn’t support a wide color gamut, yet it is more expensive, so we are more inclined to recommend the Gigabyte model here as it does offer better value for the money.

Here’s some friendly advice: if you are worried about the screen curvature, be sure to check out how curved monitors look in person before jumping to any conclusions.

Although the curvature isn’t as necessary here as it’s on ultrawide monitors, we actually prefer it on 32″ sized monitors as it does make the viewing experience more immersive.

On the other hand, if you’ve experienced curved screens and would rather stick to flat screens, the LG 32GN650 is an all-around solid display.

It has the standard 100% sRGB color gamut and it’s factory-calibrated, so you’ll get accurate and vibrant colors without over-saturation for sRGB content, which includes most video games and web content anyway.

Next, the monitor has a high contrast ratio of 3,000:1 for deep blacks as well as a decent 350-nit peak brightness.

Features

AMD FreeSync is supported with a 48-165Hz VRR range via DisplayPort and 48-144Hz via HDMI. Some users have also reported brightness flickering when using VRR.

Other useful features include Motion Blur Reduction, Black Stabilizer, customizable crosshairs and various pre-calibrated picture presets. HDR support is available as well, but it’s only software-emulated.

Design & Connectivity

LG 32GN650 Monitor Back

The LG 32GN650 features a robust and versatile design with up to 110mm height adjustment, -5°/15° tilt, 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.4 and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

  • LG 32GN600 – the same monitor but with a tilt-only stand and a more affordable price (depending on the sale)

The Pros:

  • Wide color gamut
  • Plenty of gaming features including VRR up to 144Hz
  • Fully ergonomic stand

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

If you don’t want to deal with dark-level smearing and VRR brightness flickering issues of VA panels, the Sceptre E325B-QPN168 is an excellent yet affordable 32″ 1440p 144Hz IPS gaming monitor.

Image Quality

Based on an IPS panel, the Sceptre E325B-QPN168 offers vibrant and consistent colors with ~120% sRGB color gamut volume (92% DCI-P3).

Further, its rapid pixel response time speed will ensure that there’s no prominent ghosting in fast-paced games.

Other specifications are standard for an IPS panel at this price range, including a 400-nit peak brightness, a 1,000:1 static contrast ratio and dithered 10-bit color depth support.

The Sceptre E325B-QPN168 supports AMD FreeSync with a 48-144Hz VRR range with stable G-SYNC Compatible performance. MBR is supported as well for less motion blur, as well as PiP / PbP modes.

Design & Connectivity

Sceptre E325B QPN168 Design

The stand of the monitor offers up to 95mm height adjustment, +/- 15° swivel, -5°/15° tilt, 90° pivot and 75x75mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 1.4 ports, HDMI 2.0, DisplayPort 1.2, a headphone jack, and dual 2W integrated speakers.

Alternatives

Best 32-inch 1440p 240Hz Monitors

Want to future-proof your system with a gaming monitor that has both high resolution and high refresh rate? In this category, we’ll keep you posted about the best 32″ 1440p 240Hz models available.

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio and strong peak brightness
  • Wide color gamut
  • FreeSync and MBR up to 240Hz
  • Fully ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options

The Cons:

  • 1000R curvature too steep for some users
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

With the Samsung S32BG65, you get a high 240Hz refresh rate and fast response time paired with a high contrast ratio and DisplayHDR 600!

Image Quality

Thanks to the monitor’s 600-nit peak brightness for HDR content, a high 2,500 static contrast ratio with 8-zone local dimming and a wide 95% DCI-P3 color gamut, you’re getting an immersive image quality with deep blacks, bright highlights and vibrant colors.

But there’s more, what makes the Samsung Odyssey G6 so special is, first of all, the rapid 240Hz refresh rate, which may not offer as noticeable improvement over 144Hz as 144Hz does over 60Hz, but the difference is definitely noticeable.

More importantly, the Samsung G6 monitors are one of the rare VA panel displays to deliver a 1ms GtG pixel response time speed, which makes them just as quick as some fast IPS and TN panel monitors.

So, you can enjoy both deep blacks provided by the high contrast ratio and quick response time for minimal ghosting thanks to the quick response time.

But here’s the kicker: the pixel response time performance remains consistent at all refresh rates. So, regardless if you’re using the monitor at 60Hz or with a variable refresh rate, you won’t get any prominent ghosting or overshoot!

Features

Further, the Samsung S32BG65 supports AMD FreeSync Premium Pro, and VRR works with supported NVIDIA GPUs. Sadly, as is the case with most VA and OLED displays, there’s some brightness flickering in games with fluctuating frame rates.

Other standard gaming features such as custom crosshairs, pre-calibrated picture presets and Black Equalizer are available too.

Keep in mind that to get 240Hz at 1440p 10-bit color, you’ll need a graphics card that supports DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC. Otherwise, you’ll be limited to 240Hz at 1440p with an 8-bit color depth or 144Hz at 1440p 10-bit color.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung Odyssey G65B Design

The design of the monitor includes a steep 1000R curvature which matches the curvature of the human eye for added immersion, though some people might find that the curvature is too aggressive.

Next, the stand is robust and versatile with up to 120mm height adjustment, +/- 15° swivel, -9°/13° tilt, 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility. There’s also RGB lighting at the front and back of the monitor.

Connectivity options include two DisplayPort 1.4 ports, HDMI 2.0 (max 144Hz at 1440p), a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

The Odyssey G7 models are the same monitors but without built-in smart features. Visit our Samsung Odyssey G7 review for more information.

The Pros:

  • Wide color gamut
  • Accurate colors, quick response time
  • VRR up to 260Hz
  • Ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options

The Cons:

  • Design lacks swivel option
  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology, but A-TW polarizer helps minimize the issue)

About The Monitor

If you’d rather have a flat-screen 32″ gaming monitor with 240Hz, look no further than the LG 32GQ850.

Image Quality

Just like the G6, the 32GQ850 has DisplayHDR 600 certification, implying a 600-nit peak brightness and a 16-zone local dimming solution.

However, since it has a lower native contrast ratio of 1,000:1, blacks won’t be as deep.

You do get a wider 98% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage, which results in more saturated and vibrant colors. An sRGB emulation mode is available as well with adjustable brightness.

Overall, in comparison to the 32″ G6, you get more vibrant colors, but a lower contrast ratio and IPS glow, so the viewing experience won’t be as immersive in dark rooms. So, it mainly comes down to personal preference.

The LG 32GQ850 has an A-TW polarizer which helps minimize IPS glow, but blacks still appear darker on VA panels.

VRR is supported via HDMI 2.1 VRR, AMD FreeSync Premium and NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatible certifications, and you can expect flawless tear-free performance up to 260FPS.

Other features include Black Stabilizer (improves visibility in darker scenes), various picture presets and custom crosshair overlays.

Design & Connectivity

LG UltraGear 32GQ850 Review

The stand of the monitor is quite sturdy and offers full ergonomic support with up to 110mm height adjustment, -5°/15° tilt, 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.1 ports, a headphone jack (with DTS 3D simulation) and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

  • Gigabyte Aorus FI32Q-X – another 32″ 1440p 240Hz gaming monitor. It has no A-TW polarizer but can be found for $600

Best 32-inch 4K 144Hz Monitors

Got a powerful enough GPU to maintain high frame rates at 4K UHD? The following high-end displays are for you!

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio
  • Wide color gamut
  • Plenty of features, including VRR + MBR up to 144Hz
  • High pixel density
  • Ergonomic stand, KVM

The Cons:

  • Minor ghosting behind fast-moving objects, mainly in darker scenes
  • Design lacks swivel/pivot
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

Due to its VA panel, the Gigabyte M32UC is the cheapest 32″ 4K high refresh rate gaming monitor available. So, if you’re not particularly sensitive to some dark-level smearing and screen tearing, it’s a great option for you as you won’t have to deal with the IPS glow and low contrast ratio of the more expensive IPS models.

Image Quality

The Gigabyte M32UC has a high contrast ratio of 3,000:1 and it doesn’t suffer from IPS glow, which makes for deep blacks ideal for content consumption in a dark room.

However, as VA panels don’t have as consistent colors and as wide viewing angles as IPS technology, they’re not ideal for professional color-critical work. You can still get by some basic content creation though.

The monitor has a wide 93% DCI-P3 gamut coverage for vibrant and punchy colors, and there’s an sRGB emulation mode available.

Further, it offers a good peak brightness of 350-nits, so it can get more than bright enough in well-lit rooms. HDR is supported, but it’s far from the true HDR experience due to the lack of local dimming and much higher brightness.

As it’s the case with most VA panel monitors, there’s some trailing noticeable behind fast-moving objects, but mainly in dark scenes. Unless you’re particularly sensitive to this though, it won’t be an issue.

Similarly, when using variable refresh rate, some brightness flickering can be observed in in-game menus, loading screens and at low frame rates when LFC is triggered. The intensity of this issue can vary between different units of the monitor, but it can be ‘fixed’ by disabling variable refresh rate.

The Gigabyte M32UC also supports simultaneous VRR and MBR operation via the Aim Stabilizer Sync technology up to 144FPS. If you overclock the monitor to 160Hz, you cannot use VRR.

Check out our full M32UC review for more details.

Design & Connectivity

Gigabyte M32UC Design

The stand of the monitor offers a good range of ergonomics, including up to 100mm height adjustment, -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility, while the screen has a steep 1500R curvature for added immersion.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports (24 Gbps, DSC), USB-C (DP Alt Mode, 18W PD), a USB 3.0 hub (1 upstream + 3 downstream), a headphone jack, dual 2W built-in speakers and a KVM switch.

Alternatives

The Pros:

  • High pixel density, 4K UHD
  • Accurate and vibrant colors
  • Plenty of features including FreeSync + MBR up to 160Hz, PiP/PbP
  • Ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options, KVM, USB-C 90W PD

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

If you don’t want to deal with VA’s dark level smearing and VRR brightness flickering, the MSI MAG323UPF is the cheapest 32″ 4K high refresh rate gaming monitor with an IPS panel.

Image Quality

Thanks to its IPS panel, the MSI MAG323UPF provides you with a fast pixel response time speed for no smearing in fast-paced games. You also get smooth VRR performance for tear-free gameplay up to 160FPS and wider viewing angles. When using VRR, some overshoot can be noticeable at low frame rates, but it’s tolerable.

However, you won’t get as deep blacks as that of the Gigabyte M32UC due to the lower 1,000:1 static contrast ratio.

If you want to have both: fast response times and a high contrast ratio, you’ll have to invest in an OLED or mini LED display.

The MSI MAG323UPF has a high peak brightness of 400-nits (600-nits for HDR with mere 16 dimming zones) and a wide 95% DCI-P3 color gamut.

It also offers plenty of features, such as MPRT-Sync, crosshair overlays, on-screen timers, a refresh rate tracker, PiP/PbP, Night Vision, etc.

Design & Connectivity

MSI MAG323UPF Design

The stand is robust and fairly ergonomic with up to 100mm height adjustment, -5°/20° tilt, +/- 45° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode, 90W PD), DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports, a USB 2.0 hub (3 downstream + 1 upstream) and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

  • MSI MPG321UR-QD – a 32″ 4K 144Hz model with full Adobe RGB color gamut and HDR-600. It also has built-in KVM and it’s the most cost-effective 32″ 4K IPS monitor for color-critical work involving the Adobe RGB color space. However, it’s at least $100 more expensive than the MAG323UPF – at that price range (~$700), you can find mini LED displays with proper HDR image quality, such as the Innocn 32M2V.
  • LG 32GR93U – a 32″ 4K 144Hz model with a fast 1ms GtG response time speed and well-optimized overdrive for no overshoot at low frame rates. However, it’s rather expensive at $700 – $800 considering its poor HDR image quality.
  • LG 32GQ950 – a 32″ 4K 160Hz IPS model with 1ms GtG, a high 1,000-nit peak brightness, wide 98% DCI-P3 color gamut and an A-TW polarizer that helps with IPS glow; it goes for $850 – $1000. Just like the 32GR93U, it offers poor HDR image quality for the price as it only has 32 dimming zones, and at that price, you can get a mini LED or an OLED display. So, consider these models only if you don’t care about HDR.

Best 32″ HDR Monitors

Want a 32″ monitor a proper HDR support? You’ll need a model with a FALD (full array local dimming) backlight!

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio and pixel density
  • Wide color gamut (sRGB mode)
  • High peak brightness, 1196-zone mini LED FALD
  • Quick response time, low input lag
  • Plenty of features, including VRR and MBR up to 165Hz
  • Fully ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming (in very demanding scenes)
  • The aggressive 1000R screen curvature won’t appeal to some gamers
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

The Samsung Odyssey Neo G7 is one of the best HDR monitors available, but it has some flaws that you should be aware of.

Image Quality

The Neo G7 has 1196 zones spread across the entire panel, which can dim the areas of the screen that are supposed to be dark. As a result, you simultaneously get deep blacks and bright whites.

In some demanding scenes (fireworks, stars in the night sky, etc.), blooming will be noticeable as the light from illuminated objects bleed into the surrounding dimmed zones, but this is an expected drawback of this technology.

Edge lit Dimming vs Full array Dimming

The Samsung Odyssey Neo G7 also has a high native contrast ratio of around 4,000:1, a high peak brightness of up to 1,200-nits, a wide 95% DCI-P3 color gamut and a rapid 1ms GtG pixel response time speed.

It supports VRR and MBR (not at the same time) up to 165Hz. Some units might have noticeable brightness flickering, in which case you can use the VRR Control option to prevent it (though this can increase input lag a bit and add micro-stutter).

Besides the inferior VRR performance, the Neo G7 also doesn’t have quite as wide viewing angles and consistent colors as IPS monitors, so it’s not ideal for professional color-critical work.

Check out our full Samsung Neo G7 review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung S32BG75 Review

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 120mm, +/- 15° swivel, +/- 90° pivot, -9­­°/13° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Just like the Odyssey G7, the Neo G7 has an aggressive 1000R screen curvature that won’t appeal to many users.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports (40 Gbps, DSC), a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

There’s also the Samsung Odyssey Neo G8 model with a higher 240Hz refresh rate, but it’s more expensive and has scanline issues.

The Pros:

  • High pixel density
  • Accurate and vibrant colors
  • Plenty of features including VRR up to 144Hz, PiP/PbP
  • Fully ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options, KVM, USB-C 90W PD

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes

About The Monitor

If you’d rather have a flat-screen HDR display, the Innocn 32M2V is for you!

Image Quality

The Innocn 32M2V has an IPS panel and fewer (1152) dimming zones, so you’ll get a lower contrast ratio and more blooming in comparison to the Neo G7.

However, you also get a much wider color gamut with 99% Adobe RGB and 99% DCI-P3 coverage for more vibrant, accurate and consistent colors with 178° wide viewing angles.

Further, the Innocn 32M2V has a fast pixel response time speed and offers smoother VRR performance up to 144FPS!

Check out our full Innocn 32M2V review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Innocn 27M2V Design

The stand is sturdy and offers height adjustment up to 80mm, +/- 25° swivel, -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.1 ports with full 48 Gbps bandwidth, DP 1.4 with DSC, USB-C with DP Alt Mode and 90W PD, two 5W built-in speakers, a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

  • Innocn 32A6V – the same monitor with a darker design
  • Acer Predator X32FP – has a bit faster response time, but fewer dimming zones (576) and it’s also more expensive (~$1200)

There’s also the ASUS PG32UQXR model with the same panel and 576-zone FALD as the Acer X32FP. ASUS’ model has DisplayPort 2.1, but lacks USB-C and KVM yet goes for up to $300 more. Additionally, DP 2.1 is not necessary as the DP 1.4 port on the Acer X32FP can deliver the full 4K 160Hz experience via virtually lossless compression (DSC).

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio, decent peak brightness, wide color gamut
  • High pixel density
  • Instant response time
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 240Hz
  • Ergonomic design and rich connectivity options, including KVM and USB-C with 90W PD
  • 3-year warranty that covers burn-in

The Cons:

  • Risk of burn-in
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

The MSI MPG 321URX is currently the best 32″ gaming monitor available!

Image Quality

Thanks to its OLED panel with self-emissive pixels, the MSI MPG 321URX provides you with an infinite contrast ratio as individual pixels can completely turn off to display true blacks.

On top of that, you get an exceptional 99.3% DCI-P3 gamut for vibrant colors and instantaneous pixel response time speed for zero ghosting in fast-paced games, as well as buttery-smooth VRR performance up to 240FPS.

While OLED displays can’t get as bright as some mini LED monitors, you still get a decent brightness performance with 250-nits peak for a 100% white window and up to 1,000-nits for small HDR highlights.

The monitor is also factory calibrated at Delta E < 2 for both sRGB and DCI-P3 modes and offers standard gaming features, such as Night Vision, crosshair overlays, etc.

Check out our full MSI MPG 321URX review for more details.

Design & Connectivity

MSI 321URX Review

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers a good range of ergonomics, including up to 110mm height adjustment, -5°/15° tilt, +/- 30° swivel, +/- 10° pivot for balancing and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

It has a heatsink for cooling and a semi-glossy screen finish for a more vivid image, but it’s reflective and raises the black level when hit with direct lighting.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports with full 48 Gbps and CEC support, USB-C with DP Alt Mode and 90W Power Delivery, a dual-USB 2.0 hub (2 downstream + 1 upstream type B), a headphone jack and built-in KVM functionality.

Alternatives

The MSI MPG 321URX is the most affordable 32″ 4K 240Hz QD-OLED model in the US, going for just $950. However, in other regions, the following alternatives might be cheaper.

In 2024, other manufacturers are going to release various 32″ 4K 240Hz QD-OLED flat-screen models as well. Check out our OLED monitors article for more details.

The Pros:

  • Wide color gamut
  • High pixel density
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 240Hz and 1080p 480Hz Mode
  • Ergonomic design
  • 2-year burn-in warranty

The Cons:

  • Risk of burn-in
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

If you want a 32″ 4K 240Hz OLED gaming monitor with a 1080p 480Hz Dual Mode, you should consider the LG 32GS95UE!

Image Quality

The LG 32GS95UE has a button beneath the bottom bezel that can switch between 4K 240Hz and 1080p 480Hz modes in a few seconds!

Naturally, because the monitor is displaying a non-native resolution, 1920×1080 will be a bit blurry on the 31.5″ sized display, but if you push the monitor a bit further, it won’t be that noticeable in games and videos, while 480Hz provides you with incredible motion clarity!

It uses a W-OLED panel with a new subpixel layout, so there’s no fringing on small text and fine details like it’s the case with previous-gen W-OLED panels.

You also get improved brightness performance with up to 275-nits for 100% APL and up to 1300-nits for < 3% APL. Samsung’s QD-OLED panels still have a wider color gamut and higher color volume, so they have a higher perceived brightness.

Regardless, the colors are vibrant on the LG 32GS95UE thanks to its wide 98.5% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage. The monitor also supports true 10-bit color depth, has 178° wide viewing angles and a calibrated sRGB emulation mode.

Other features include VRR up to 240Hz, Black Stabilizer, a refresh rate tracker, hardware calibration support and crosshair overlays.

Check out our full LG 32GS95UE review for more details.

Design & Connectivity

LG 32GS95UE Design

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 120mm, 90° pivot, +/- 15° swivel, -10°/15° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility. The screen has a 4-side borderless design and a matte anti-glare coating that adds a bit of graininess to the image (mainly noticeable on solid colors), but efficiently prevents reflections.

Connectivity options include DP 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports with full 48 Gbps bandwidth, a headphone jack (with DTS Headphone:X) and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

The LG 32GS95UE also boasts the new Pixel Sound technology, which produces sound by vibrating film components applied to the OLED display instead of having speakers at the rear or the sides of the monitor for more realistic and clearer audio.

Alternatives

  • ASUS ROG Swift OLED PG32UCDP – upcoming model by ASUS based on the same panel with USB-C, KVM, BFI up to 120Hz and a heatsink for cooling instead of a fan

Best 32″ Professional Monitors

Need a monitor for photo/video editing or similar work and want a 32″ sized screen? Here are the best models available.

The Pros:

  • High pixel density, wide color gamut, consistent colors
  • High contrast ratio
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync up to 60Hz
  • Ergonomic design and rich connectivity options, including USB-C with 90W PD

The Cons:

  • IPS glow (as expected from this panel technology)
  • Design lacks swivel option

About The Monitor

If you just want a 32″ monitor for basic sRGB color-critical work, consider getting the Sceptre U325W-UPT we mentioned along with a colorimeter, such as the SpyderX Pro, to calibrate and profile the monitor yourself for ~$400 in total, which is the most cost-effective solution.

However, if you want wider DCI-P3 gamut coverage as well as some additional features, the LG 32BQ85U is an excellent choice for $600 – $650.

Image Quality

To start with, the LG 32BQ85U uses a Nano IPS Black panel, which provides you with a 2,000:1 static contrast ratio.

As a result, you get deeper blacks in comparison to the standard 1,000:1 contrast ratio of most IPS panels, while keeping the 178° wide viewing angles and excellent image consistency.

Next, you get a wide 98% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage with an sRGB emulation mode, factory calibration and basic DisplayHDR 400 support.

The LG 32BQ85U also supports variable refresh rate with a 40-60Hz dynamic range, Black Stabilizer and Dual Controller (an application that works as a KVM switch if both devices are connected to the same network).

Design & Connectivity

LG 32BQ85U Design

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 110mm, 90° pivot, -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options are abundant and include DisplayPort 1.2, two HDMI 2.0 ports, USB-C with DP Alt Mode and 90W PD, two USB ports, a headphone jack and dual 5W built-in speakers.

Alternatives

In case the LG 32BQ85U is not available, check out the Dell U3223QE (KVM, RJ45, DP-output), the Dell U3223QZ (same as the QE + a built-in webcam) and the LG 32UQ85R (A-TW polarizer that reduces IPS glow) as alternatives. They use the same panel with a bit different features, but the 32BQ85U is usually the cheapest and offers the best value for money.

If you want a 32″ monitor with Adobe RGB color gamut for print work, the BenQ SW321C is the best model available, though it’s quite expensive.

As an alternative, we recommend trying to get the Lenovo P32u-10 (might be discontinued) or a 32″ 4K 144Hz gaming monitor, such as the Innocn 32M2V, the Acer X32FP or the MSI MPG321UR-QD with Adobe RGB gamut coverage and pairing it with a colorimeter for manual calibration. Another option is the OLED monitor we’ll get into next.

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio, decent peak brightness, high pixel density
  • Exceptional color gamut, true 10-bit panel, Delta E < 1 factory calibration
  • Excellent value for the money
  • Plenty of features, including PiP/PbP
  • Ergonomic design and USB-C with up to 90W Power Delivery

The Cons:

  • Risk of burn-in
  • No VRR
  • No standard DP/HDMI ports

About The Monitor

The Innocn 32Q1U offers exceptional image quality and accuracy at a reasonable price. So, if you don’t need a high refresh rate and gaming features, it will suit you very well.

Image Quality

OLED panels have an infinite contrast ratio as each pixel can individually turn off and provide you with true blacks without any haloing or backlight blooming.

They can’t get quite as bright as some LED-backlit displays, but the Innocn 32Q1U has a respectable 540-nit peak brightness for small HDR highlights and up to ~250-nits for a 100% white window.

Additionally, unlike LG’s W-OLED and Samsung’s QD-OLED panels with peculiar subpixel layouts, the JOLED panel of the Innocn 32Q1U uses the standard RGB layout for sharp text and fine details without fringing.

Besides the infinite contrast ratio and excellent brightness levels, the Innocn 32Q1U also has an impressive color gamut with 99% Adobe RGB and DCI-P3 coverage, as well as an impeccable Delta E < 1 factory calibration. You also get true 10-bit color depth for smooth gradients without banding.

It doesn’t support variable refresh rate, but you’ll find all the standard image adjustment tools in the OSD menu, as well as PiP/PbP support.

The main downside of OLED panels is the risk of burn-in, but if you’re using the monitor sensible, it shouldn’t be an issue.

Design & Connectivity

Innocn 32Q1U Design

The monitor offers height adjustment up to 120mm, +/- 30° swivel, -5°/15° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two USB-C ports with DP Alt Mode and 90W Power Delivery (45W if using both ports) and an additional USB-C port for audio (a USB-C to 3.5mm jack is provided).

Alternatives

  • LG 32EP950, 32BP95E – LG’s models based on the same (or similar panel), but they have been discontinued
  • ASUS PA32DC – ASUS’ model with built-in calibration, shading hood and more premium features, but it’s significantly more expensive ($3,000+)
  • ASUS PA32DCM – ASUS’ upcoming model with Thunderbolt 4 and even higher brightness; though there’s no word on pricing and availability yet

You might also be interested in the Dell UltraSharp U3224KB with a 6K (6144×3456) resolution or the Apple Pro Display XDR (6016×3384).

While these displays do offer an exceptionally sharp image quality with ~220 PPI (pixels per inch), they are too expensive; Dell’s model with a Nano IPS Black panel goes for $2500, while Apple’s IPS monitor goes for $5000 – $7000 (depending on the glass finish).

The main issue is that the Pro Display XDR has only 576 dimming zones, which doesn’t have a good enough backlight control for professional HDR editing, while the Dell U3224KB only has a 600-nit peak brightness.

So, while you may consider these displays due to their high resolution and other features, keep in mind that they’re mainly niche luxury products with poor value for the money.

Conclusion

If you’re still not sure which 32-inch monitor is perfect for you, leave us a comment below, and we’ll gladly help you out! 

All in all, unless you’re on a tight budget, we recommend investing in one of the 1440p models as 1080p really looks pixelated on 32″ monitors.

This is why we recommend the Gigabyte M32QC as the best budget/value model. If you just want a cheap 1080p display, you should get the LG 32MR50C.

The Samsung G6 and the LG 32GQ850 kick it up a notch further, but at a higher price, so consider them only if you have a powerful enough PC rig to put them to good use.

As for the 4K models, both the MSI MAG323UPF and M32UC are excellent SDR displays, but you might want to consider saving up a bit more for a proper HDR monitor.

For HDR, we recommend the MSI MP 321URX, Samsung Neo G7 and the Innocn 32M2V, depending on your panel technology preference. For color-critical work, the LG 32BQ85U and the Innocn 32Q1U are both great picks – it again boils down to your panel preference.

Updates +

  • May 27, 2024:
    – Replaced the ASUS PG329Q with the Sceptre E325B-QPN168, the Dell AW3225QF with the MSI MPG 321URX, and the Samsung Odyssey G7 with the Odyssey G6.
    – Added the LG 32GS95UE.
  • February 6, 2024:
    – Replaced the Gigabyte M32U with the MSI MAG323UPF and the Acer X32FP with the Innocn 32M2V.
  • January 16, 2024:
    – Added the Dell AW3225QF.
  • December 23, 2023:
    – Added the LG 32MR50C.
  • November 24, 2023:
    – Added the Sceptre E325B-QPN168 as an alternative to the ASUS PG329Q.
  • November 1, 2023:
    – Added the Sceptre U325W-UPT, the Samsung M70B, the LG 32BQ85U and the Innocn 32Q1U.
    – Replaced the Gigabyte M32Q with the ASUS PG329Q.
    – Removed the LG 32UN500, the Philips 328E1CA and the LG 32UP83A (these are now mentioned as alternatives to the Sceptre U325W-UPT.
  • March 13, 2023:
    – Added the Acer X32FP and the Gigabyte M32U.
    – Removed the LG 32GQ950.
  • November 22, 2022:
    – Checked up on the guide to ensure that our picks are still the best options available.
  • August 31, 2022:
    – Replaced the Gigabyte G32QCA with the M32QC, the Acer XB323UGX with the LG 32GQ850, and the MSI MPG321UR-QD with the LG 32GQ950.
    – Added the Gigabyte M32UC and the Samsung Neo G7.
  • February 16, 2022:
    – Updated alternatives for the MPG321UR-QD.
  • November 25, 2021:
    – Checked up on the guide to ensure that our picks are still the best options available.
  • November 19, 2021:
    – Removed the Philips 322E1C and 325E1C, as well as the AOC C32G1.
    – Added the MSI MPG321UR-QD.
  • August 5, 2021:
    – Replaced the AOC Q3279VWFD8 with the LG 32QN600; the LG 32GK650F with the LG 32GN650; and the Acer XB323UGP with the Gigabyte M32Q.
    – Removed the HP Pavilion Gaming 32 and the Samsung CHG70.
    – Added the Acer XB323UGX, the Gigabyte M32U, and the ASUS PG32UQX to the table; dedicated review sections will be added soon.
  • May 1, 2021:
    – Improved readability across the board and fixed spelling/grammar issues.
  • February 24, 2021:
    – Replaced the Philips 328E9QJAB with the updated Philips 322E1C model.
    – Removed the ASUS CG32UQ.
    – Added the LG 32UN650.
  • February 10, 2021:
    – Added the LG 32GN650 as an alternative to the LG 32GK650F.

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Rob Shafer

Rob is a software engineer with a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver. He now works full-time managing DisplayNinja while coding his own projects on the side.