The Best TVs For PS5 And Xbox Series X (2024 Reviews)

Looking for a new TV for your PS5, Xbox Series X, or Xbox Series S console? You'll find the best gaming TVs and all the information you need right here!

It would be a shame to hook up your brand new PS5 or Xbox Series X/S console to an old TV with washed out colors, grayish blacks, smearing, and other unwelcome visual artifacts.

Luckily, you don’t need a particularly expensive TV to put your console’s powerful hardware to good use.

Whether you need a budget 4K TV that’s good for gaming or a high-end TV that’s every gamer’s dream – we’ve got you covered!

TVPanelInput LagResponse TimeVRR1080p/1440p 120Hz4K 120Hz 
VA7ms14msYesYesNo
VA6ms11msYesYesYes
VA5ms13msYesYesYes
OLED6ms<1msYesYesYes
QD-OLED6ms<1msYesYesYes
budget pick

TCL Q650G

TCL Q650G
  • 1080p/1440p 120Hz
  • Low input lag, good response time
  • Decent brightness and contrast
best value

Hisense U8K

Hisense U8K
  • 4K 120Hz
  • Low input lag, good response time
  • High brightness and contrast ratio
premium pick

Samsung S90C

Samsung S90C
  • 4K 120Hz
  • Low input lag, fast response time speed
  • Decent brightness, infinite contrast ratio

We’ll start with the most affordable TVs you should consider for gaming, and gradually move up to the more expensive models with better image quality, smoother performance, and additional features.

The Pros:

  • Inexpensive
  • Low input lag
  • Good response time speed
  • Decent HDR image quality

The Cons:

  • Low peak brightness for the optimal HDR image quality
  • Minor ghosting in fast-paced games

About The TV

So, what exactly makes a TV good for gaming?

First of all, you need low input lag in order not to feel any delay between your commands and the result on the TV. For 60Hz TVs, input lag under 16ms is great, whereas for 120Hz TVs, it should be 8ms or lower.

Secondly, you’ll want a fast response time speed, which is the speed at which pixels change from one color to another. If they take too long, you will be able to notice trailing artifacts behind fast-moving objects. The faster the response time, the better.

The Q650G TVs from TCL are the most affordable 4K gaming TVs that offer 120Hz, low input lag and fast response time, which is why we highly recommend saving up for it.

Image Quality

Another reason why we recommend the TCL Q650G is that it also offers excellent picture quality for the price!

It uses a VA (Vertical Alignment) panel with a high static contrast ratio of ~8000:1, which is even higher than that of many more expensive TVs.

It has a peak brightness of 500-nits, so highlights (such as explosions) fall short when watching HDR content.

Of course, if you want a really good HDR TV, you’ll need to invest more money.

The TV also has a wide ~95% DCI-P3 color gamut for vibrant and lifelike colors. Supported HDR formats include HDR10, HDR10+, HLG and Dolby Vision.

Features

The TV supports 120Hz at 1080p and 1440p, but due to the lack of HDMI 2.1, it’s limited to 60Hz at 4K UHD. Considering how demanding 4K gaming is, most gamers will prefer to game at lower resolution to gain higher frame rates anyway.

You can also use motion interpolation up to 30FPS for the so-called Soap Opera Effect, though we highly recommend not using this.

There’s a 150Hz PWM flicker for brightness regulation, but it’s only present at low brightness levels. To avoid it, keep brightness above 28/100. In the Low Power mode, keep it above 60.

The TV can also remove 24Hz judder from 24p Blu-ray/DVD content and native streaming applications such as Netflix.

Chroma 4:4:4 is supported as well, so text won’t be fringy when using the TV as a PC monitor.

Design & Connectivity

TCL Q650G Design

The TCL Q650G has a rather slim design, thin bezels and VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include three HDMI 2.0 ports (ARC/eARC support for Dolby Digital/Atmos and DTS/X), a USB 2.0 port, both digital and analog audio jacks, two built-in speakers, composite-in, tuner, Ethernet and WiFi.

Alternatives

If you can’t afford the Q650G, check out the TCL S450G with low input lag and decent response time, though it’s limited to 60Hz.

The Pros:

  • Excellent value for the price
  • Low input lag
  • Good response time speed
  • Great HDR image quality
  • HDMI 2.1

The Cons:

  • Minor ghosting in fast-paced games
  • Local dimming causes some halo/bloom effects

About The TV

If you want to take advantage of 120Hz, TCL’s 2020 6-series TVs are the cheapest models with this feature; luckily, they are exceptionally good!

Image Quality

The TCL R646 has only a slightly faster pixel response time speed than the Q650G, so some smearing will still be noticeable in fast-paced games.

However, the higher 120Hz refresh rate makes fast-paced motion significantly smoother making for a more enjoyable gaming experience.

The TV refreshes the image twice as fast, essentially cutting input lag in half, thus providing you with a slight advantage over your opponents with regular 60Hz displays.

But that’s not all!

The R646 series also offers considerably better image quality. It has a stellar peak brightness of 1200-nits and a static contrast ratio of ~8,500:1.

Further, its mini LED backlight has an excellent local dimming implementation, which can push the contrast ratio up to ~20,000:1 for even deeper blacks and punchier highlights.

Alas, there aren’t that many dimming zones (128 on the 55″ variant), so some blooming and haloing will be visible in certain scenarios.

In addition to its ~93% DCI-P3 color gamut, it delivers an eye-catching HDR viewing experience for the price. Supported HDR formats include HDR10, HDR10+, HLG, and Dolby Vision.

Features

Additionally, AMD FreeSync is supported up to 120Hz, which allows the TV to change its refresh rate dynamically. So, at 100FPS, the TV changes its refresh rate to 100Hz and thus eliminates screen tearing and stuttering completely, without noticeably (~1ms) affecting input lag.

It also supports BFI at 120Hz via its LED Motion Clarity technology and it can interpolate frames up to 120FPS (Soap Opera Effect).

Design & Connectivity

TCL R646 TV Back

The TV features excellent build quality with a slim design and thin bezels.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 and two HDMI 2.1 ports, two USB 2.0 ports, both digital and analog audio jacks, composite-in, tuner, Ethernet, WiFi (2.4 GHz and 5 GHz) and dual 15W integrated speakers.

HDCP 2.2, CEC, ARC (HDMI1 only), and eARC are supported over HDMI, while other supported audio formats include DTS, DTS:X, Dolby Digital, and Dolby Atmos.

Alternatives

In case the R646 is not available, check out the Hisense U7K.

The Pros:

  • Low input lag
  • Good response time speed
  • Great HDR image quality
  • HDMI 2.1

The Cons:

  • Minor ghosting in fast-paced games, especially in darker scenes
  • Local dimming causes some halo/bloom effects

About The TV

If you want something a bit better than the TCL R646, we recommend the Hisense U8K series.

Image Quality

In comparison to TCL’s R646, you get a notably higher peak brightness of up to 2100-nits, so highlights will be even more vivid and punchy!

Further, the local dimming solution can improve the contrast ratio to up to 165,000:1 for deep blacks.

Colors are vibrant and vivid with ~97% DCI-P3 gamut, while the supported HDR formats include HDR10, HDR10+, Dolby Vision and HLG.

Features

The Hisense U8K TVs have a very low input lag of ~5ms, as well as an excellent pixel response time speed of ~13ms.

So, some ghosting will be noticeable, but it’s mostly negligible.

There’s a BFI feature available, which works at both 60Hz and 120Hz, while framerate interpolation is also supported up to 120FPS.

The TV can remove judder from all content and it supports 4:4:4 chroma, while its backlight flickers at 4000Hz to regulate brightness, which shouldn’t bother those sensitive to flickering due to such high frequency.

Design & Connectivity

Hisense U8K Design

The Hisense U8K has a very slim design despite having a full-array local dimming implementation and it’s VESA mount compatible.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.1 ports, two HDMI 2.0 ports (eARC/ARC support for Dolby Atmos/Digital and DTS:X), two USB 2.0 ports, both analog and digital audio jacks, integrated speakers, tuner, Ethernet, and WiFi.

The Pros:

  • HDMI 2.1 for 4K 120Hz
  • VRR
  • Low input lag
  • Instantaneous response time speed
  • Excellent HDR image quality

The Cons:

  • Risk of permanent image burn-in
  • No HDR10+

About The TV

OLED TVs offer the best image quality and the smoothest performance, but they’re a bit more expensive and you have to be careful about screen burn-in.

Image Quality

Unlike LED-backlit displays, OLED TVs and monitors don’t rely on a backlight to produce the image as each pixel is self-emissive. This makes for a basically infinite contrast ratio. Black is black. White is white, and there’s no backlight bleeding or glowing of any kind.

Additionally, the OLED technology offers superior color quality and viewing angles. The C3 has a wide ~98% DCI-P3 color gamut, and the picture will remain perfect regardless of the angle you’re looking at the screen.

Its peak brightness is a bit lower than that of LED TVs at this price range, but at ~800-nits maximum luminance for HDR content, you still get an amazing HDR viewing experience, especially in dark rooms, where the infinite contrast ratio really shines at.

Supported HDR formats include HDR10, Dolby Vision, and HLG.

The main downside of OLEDs is the risk of permanent image burn-in and temporary image retention. Basically, if you leave the TV on for a long time, the static elements of the picture can permanently burn in.

However, there are plenty of built-in features to prevent this, such as screen savers, pixel refreshers/shifters, etc.

Image retention, on the other hand, is when the static elements (such as in-game HUDs or mini-maps) remain visible once the picture changes, but it goes away after watching different content for a while.

If you’re careful, this won’t be an issue, it’s just something to keep in mind. You can still enjoy playing your favorite games for up to ~8 hours, and then display something else on the TV so that the pixels ‘refresh.’

Many games offer ways to help with this, like hiding the HUD, scoreboards, mini-maps when not needed, etc. You should avoid using the TV as background noise or leaving it paused at game menus for hours, and you’ll be good to go.

Features

freesync and gsync

The LG C3 supports both AMD FreeSync and NVIDIA’s G-SYNC Compatible variable refresh rate up to 120Hz. So, you can use VRR with both the PS5 and the Xbox Series X and Series S, as well as with compatible AMD and NVIDIA graphics cards without any issues.

Another big advantage of the OLED technology is the instantaneous pixel response time speed, which makes for zero ghosting in fast-paced games and incredible motion clarity.

Framerate interpolation is also supported up to 120FPS. Input lag amounts to ~6ms, which makes for imperceptible delay.

PWM is not used for brightness regulation, but there are some luminance fluctuations every ~8ms. However, it’s not noticeable. Naturally, 4:4:4 chroma is supported and you can remove judder from any content.

Design & Connectivity

LG OLED55C3 Design

The design is ultra-thin and VESA mount compatible, while connectivity options include four HDMI 2.1 ports (e/ARC for Dolby and DTS), three USB ports, a digital audio jack, a tuner, integrated speakers, WiFi and Ethernet.

Alternatives

  • LG OLED55B3 – a bit lower brightness, a bit slower processor and only two HDMI 2.1 ports (and two HDMI 2.0), but it can be up to ~$300 cheaper
  • LG OLED55B2 – 2022 model of the B3 with similar specs, can be found on sale for just $850

The Pros:

  • HDMI 2.1 for 4K 120Hz
  • VRR
  • Low input lag
  • Instantaneous response time speed
  • Excellent HDR image quality

The Cons:

  • Risk of permanent image burn-in
  • No Dolby Vision

About The TV

If you want an even better OLED display, check out the Samsung S90C!

Image Quality

The Samsung S90C is based on an OLED panel that’s enhanced by quantum dot technology (QD-OLED) for even better colors and brightness.

In fact, while the C3 has a maximum sustainable brightness of ~150-nits for a 100% white window, the S90C can easily maintain 200-nits! Additionally, it can reach up to around 1000-nits for small highlights.

On top of that, the Samsung S90C has a wider color gamut with 100% DCI-P3 coverage for more lifelike colors. The extra color saturation also makes for higher perceived brightness.

Other advantages over the C3 OLED TV include a bit wider viewing angles, better factory calibration and better burn-in resistance.

Features

The TV supports variable refresh rate via HDMI 2.1 VRR, FreeSync Premium and G-SYNC Compatible technologies, though it lacks NVIDIA’s official certification at the moment.

You can also set it to 144Hz at 4K via PC. Black Frame Insertion is supported as well, but sadly only at 60Hz.

It’s based on Samsung’s Tizen OS and it supports HDR10, HDR10+ and HLG HDR formats, but there’s no Dolby Vision support.

Samsung’s QD-OLED panels have peculiar RGB subpixels in a triangular layout, which can cause small text to have minor fringing, but it’s not an issue for playing games or watching videos at a normal viewing distance.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung S90C Design

The TV has a slim design, but its screen coating doesn’t have a polarizer, which can cause the image to have a somewhat pink tint and raised blacks under direct lighting.

Connectivity options are abundant and include four HDMI 2.1 ports (e/ARC with Dolby Atmos/Digital support), two USB 2.0 ports, both digital and analog audio ports, WiFi, RJ45, tuner and built-in speakers.

Alternatives

LG’s G3 OLED TV has a higher peak brightness than the C series. It can sustain around 230-nits and reach up to ~1,300-nits, but it doesn’t have quite as wide color gamut as the S90C. Due to LG’s better reflection handling, the G3 is better suited for brighter rooms, while the S90C is superior in dark rooms. However, the G3 is a lot more expensive.

There’s also the Samsung S95C model. It’s similar to the S90C, but it uses the external OneConnect box for connectivity and it’s a bit brighter (230-nits full-field, up to 1300-nits for smaller highlights). It’s more expensive though.

Conclusion

These are the best TVs for PS5 and Xbox Series X or Xbox Series S we recommend! Not sure which one to get? Feel free to leave us a comment below!

Overall, if you’re on a limited budget, you can’t go wrong with the TCL Q650G, but we recommend saving up for the TCL R646 as you’ll get a significantly better image quality and smoother performance.

To take your gaming and viewing experience to the next level, go with LG’s C3 or Samsung’s S90C OLED TVs. In case you can’t afford them or you’re too worried about burn-in, the Hisense U8K TVs are excellent LED-backlit alternatives.

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Rob Shafer

Rob is a software engineer with a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver. He now works full-time managing DisplayNinja while coding his own projects on the side.