The Best Monitors With Built-in Docking Station (2024 Reviews)

Looking for a monitor with a built-in docking station? Check out all the best models available right now as well as all you need to know about them!

Want a neat and tidy desk? Don’t bother with a bunch of cables every time you need to connect your laptop, just get a monitor with built-in docking!

In this guide, you’ll find the best docking monitors available and everything you need to know in order to pick the model that’s best suited to your preferences and use case!

MonitorSizeResolutionPanelDisplay InputsOther Connectivity
24”1920x1080IPSHDMI, DP, USB-C (65W PD)RJ45, 3x USB-A, 2x2W
24”1920x1080IPSHDMI, DP, DP-Out, USB-C (60W PD)RJ45, 2x USB-A, USB-B, 2x2W
27”2560x1440IPSHDMI, DP, DP-Out, USB-C (60W PD)RJ45, 2x USB-A, USB-B, 2x2W
27”3840x2160IPS2x HDMI, DP,
USB-C (90W PD)
RJ45, 4x USB-A, Audio-Out, 2x3W
32”3840x2160IPS2x HDMI, DP,
USB-C (90W)
RJ45, 4x USB-A, Audio-Out, 2x5W, Webcam
43”3840x2160IPS2x HDMI, 2x DP,
USB-C (90W)
RJ45, 4x USB-A, 4x USB-C, Audio-Out, 2x8W, KVM
34”3440x1440IPS2x HDMI, DP,
USB-C (90W PD)
RJ45, 4x USB-A, USB-B, Audio-Out, 2x7W, KVM
38”3840x1600IPS
Black
2x HDMI, DP,
USB-C (90W PD)
RJ45, 5x USB-A, 3x USB-C, Audio-Out, 2x9W, KVM
40”5120x2160IPSHDMI, DP,
Thunderbolt 3 in/out (100W PD)
RJ45, 4x USB-A, Audio-Out, 2x5W, KVM, Webcam
49”5120x1440VAHDMI, DP,
USB-C (90W PD)
RJ45, 3x USB-A, USB-B, Audio-Out, 2x5W, KVM
49”5120x1440IPS Black2x HDMI, DP,
USB-C (90W PD)
RJ45, 5x USB-A, 3x USB-C, Audio-Out, 2x9W, KVM
budget pick

ASUS VA24ECPSN

ASUS VA24ECPSN
  • 24″ 1080p IPS
  • 65W PD
  • Affordable
best value

Philips 279P1

Philips 279P1 Monitor
  • 27″ 4K IPS
  • 90W PD
  • Wide Color Gamut
premium pick

Dell U4924DW

Dell U4924DW
  • 49″ 5120×1440 IPS Black
  • 90W PD, KVM Switch
  • Wide Color Gamut

We’ve only selected docking monitors that offer at least: one HDMI and DP input, an RJ45/Ethernet port, built-in speakers, a USB hub and USB-C with Power Delivery of at least 60W.

All of the included monitors will therefore provide you with audio/video signal, Internet, sound output, USB ports for peripherals/data and power charging – and all you have to do is plug in one USB-C cable from your already set up monitor to your laptop!

In case your laptop doesn’t support DisplayPort Alternate Mode over USB-C, you’ll have to use a USB cable (type B to type A for peripherals, data and Internet) and your standard laptop charger along with the display input of your choice (HDMI, DisplayPort).

You can view our changelogs for this buying guide at the end of this article.

The Pros:

  • Affordable
  • Accurate colors, wide viewing angles
  • Fully ergonomic stand

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The ASUS VA24ECPSN is the cheapest monitor with built-in docking that’s actually good and offers everything you need for a clean setup!

Image Quality

Like most monitors included in this guide, the ASUS VA24ECPSN uses IPS panel technology that provides accurate and consistent colors with 178° wide viewing angles, ensuring that the image remains perfect regardless of the angle you’re looking at the screen.

The 1920×1080 Full HD resolution results in a decent pixel density on the 24″ sized screen of the VA24ECPSN.

With roughly 92 PPI (pixels per inch), you get a fair amount of screen real estate with reasonably sharp details; at a normal viewing distance, you won’t be able to notice individual pixels, unlike on 27″ 1080p monitors.

Peak brightness amounts to 300-nits, so the screen can get more than bright enough under normal lighting conditions.

As with all IPS monitors, there’s is some IPS glow and the contrast ratio is limited to around 1,000:1, so you won’t get quite as deep blacks as that of VA panel monitors. Of course, VA displays have other flaws and it’s rare to find one with a built-in stocking station anyway.

The ASUS VA24ECPSN has a 100% sRGB gamut coverage and 8-bit color depth support (6-bit + 2-bit FRC) for 16.7 million colors, which along with its IPS panel makes it suitable for entry-level color-critical work after proper calibration.

Features

freesync and gsync

Moving on, the monitor even supports variable refresh rate with a 48-75Hz dynamic range for tear-free gameplay up to 75FPS.

75Hz also provides a tiny (but noticeable) boost in motion clarity as opposed to 60Hz.

Further, thanks to its quick response time, low input lag and vivid colors, video games will still look good and run smoothly.

Other features include QuickFit (places various alignment grids on the screen for certain document sizes), on-screen timers and crosshair overlays.

Design & Connectivity

ASUS VA24ECPSN Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers full ergonomic support, including up to 130mm height adjustment, +/- 90° pivot, -5°/35° tilt, +/- 180° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.2, HDMI 1.4, USB-C (DP 1.2 Alt Mode, 65W PD), RJ45, three downstream USB-A 3.0 ports, a headphone jack and dual 2W integrated speakers.

The Pros:

  • Accurate colors, wide viewing angles
  • Fully ergonomic stand
  • DP-Out for daisy-chaining

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

If you want a clean multi-monitor setup, the VG2456 has a DisplayPort output for daisy-chaining.

Image Quality

In terms of image quality, you get the same viewing experience as with the ASUS VA24ECPSN, though the VG2456 is not quite as bright with 250-nit maximum brightness.

Next, since the monitor doesn’t support Adaptive-Sync and is limited to 60Hz, it won’t be particularly interesting to gamers.

Noteworthy features include Black Stabilizer (improves visibility in dark scenes), low-blue light filter modes and advanced image adjustment tools, such as 6-axis hue/saturation, 6 gamma presets (from 1.8 to 2.8) and sharpness.

Design & Connectivity

ViewSonic VG2456 Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is robust and versatile with up to 130mm height adjustment, -5°/40° tilt, 90° pivot, +/- 60° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include HDMI 1.4, DisplayPort 1.2, USB-C (DP 1.2 Alt Mode, 60W PD), RJ45, DP-Out for daisy-chaining up to 4 monitors, dual 2W integrated speakers, a USB-B upstream port and two 5Gbps downstream USB-A ports at the side of the screen.

There’s also the ViewSonic VG2456A variant with a higher 90W PD for $40 extra.

In order to daisy-chain monitors, the main display must be connected via either DP or USB-C and the ‘DP’ option enabled in the OSD menu (maximum 1080p resolution). Ethernet connection can be passed through via either USB-C or HDMI/DP + USB upstream.

Alternatives

The Dell P2422HE is another premium model based on the same panel, offering basically identical image quality and performance. It has two additional 5Gbps USB-A ports and a slightly higher 65W PD over USB-C, but it has no USB-B port or speakers and it’s ~$50 more expensive.

If you’re looking for a premium 1080p docking monitor, there’s the Dell U2422HE model with 90W PD and an integrated KVM switch.

It also has more extensive connectivity options (DP, DP-Out, HDMI, USB-C with 90W PD, USB-C upstream, USB-C downstream with 15W PD, four USB-A downstream ports with 10Gbps, a headphone jack and RJ45. However, it goes for around $450; no built-in speakers. It’s a good option if you can find it on sale for $250 – $300.

The Pros:

  • Good value for money
  • Decent pixel density
  • Accurate colors, wide viewing angles
  • Fully ergonomic stand
  • DP-Out for daisy-chaining

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The Viewsonic VG2756-2K is the 27″ 1440p version of the above-mentioned VG2456.

Image Quality

With the 2560×1440 QHD resolution on a 27″ monitor, you get a high pixel density of 108 PPI (pixels per inch). As a result, you’ll have plenty of screen space as well as sharp text and details, without any scaling necessary.

Further, in comparison to the VG2456, the 27″ variant has a higher 350-nit peak brightness and true 8-bit color depth without dithering.

Other features and specifications are identical to the 24″ version.

Design & Connectivity

ViewSonic VG2456 Monitor Design 1

The design and connectivity options are the same as they are on the VG2456. The main difference is that the DisplayPort-Out allows you to daisy chain two 1440p monitors, four 1080p displays, or two 1080p + one 1440p.

Alternatives

Once again, you have the option to go with three more expensive Dell variants:

  • P2722HE – HDMI, DP, DP-Out, USB-C with 65W PD, 4x USB-A 5Gbps, RJ45
  • P2723DE – HDMI, DP, DP-Out, USB-C with 90W PD, 4x USB-A 5Gbps, RJ45
  • U2722DE – HDMI, DP, DP-Out, USB-C with 90W PD, 4x USB-A 10Gbps, USB-C downstream, USB-C with 15W PD, RJ45, headphone jack, KVM switch

The Pros:

  • High pixel density
  • Wide Color Gamut
  • Accurate colors, wide viewing angles
  • Fully ergonomic stand
  • 90W PD, four USB ports

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

ViewSonic also offers a 4K version of the VG2756-2K, the VG2756-4K with 90W PD; however, we recommend the Philips 279P1 instead as it offers additional features at a lower cost. Depending on region and availability though, both are worth considering.

Image Quality

On a 27″ monitor, 4K UHD resolution provides stunning detail clarity and a lot of screen space with 163 PPI. You will need to use scaling in order to make small text readable, as a result, you get less screen real estate, but the details are even sharper.

1080p monitor vs 4K (Scaling)

While having a 4K monitor for office-related use and content consumption is great, if you plan on doing video editing or gaming, make sure your PC will be able to handle it.

The Philips 279P1 has a peak brightness of 350-nits, a static contrast ratio of 1,000:1, ~122% sRGB gamut size (with an sRGB mode) and dithered 10-bit color depth support for 1.07 billion colors.

It’s also factory-calibrated at Delta E < 2 for excellent accuracy out of the box.

Although limited to 60Hz and without a variable refresh rate, its vibrant colors, crisp details and quick response time still provide an enjoyable gaming experience.

Features

The screen has a built-in sensor that can adjust brightness according to ambient lighting and reduce it after detecting that nobody is in front of the screen.

You’ll also find advanced image adjustment tools, such as five gamma presets and six color temperature modes. SmartUniformity is available as well for improved screen uniformity at a cost of contrast ratio.

Design & Connectivity

Philips 279P1 Monitor Back

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers full ergonomic support with up to 150mm height adjustment, +/- 90° pivot, +/- 180° swivel, -5°/35° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports, USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode, 90W PD), four downstream USB 3.0 ports, a headphone jack, RJ45 and two 3W built-in speakers.

Alternatives

If you need a 27″ 4K monitor for professional color-critical work that also has a built-in dock, we recommend the Dell UltraSharp U2723QE.

The Pros:

  • High pixel density
  • Wide Color Gamut
  • Accurate colors, wide viewing angles
  • Fully ergonomic stand
  • 90W PD, four USB ports, webcam

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The Philips 329P1H is basically a 32″ version of the 279P1 but with a few extra features too!

Image Quality

The 4K UHD resolution looks great even on 32″ sized screens. With 140 PPI (pixels per inch), you get plenty of screen space and vivid details, but depending on your preference, you might not need to use scaling at all!

Just like the 27″ version, the 329P1H has a peak brightness of 350-nits, a 1,000:1 contrast ratio and a bit wider 128% sRGB gamut size with a factory-calibrated sRGB emulation mode at Delta E < 2.

Features

In addition, the Philips 329P1H supports Adaptive-Sync, providing you with a variable refresh rate within the supported 40-60Hz/FPS range for tear-free gameplay if you have a compatible AMD or NVIDIA graphics card.

There’s an integrated sensor that can automatically change the brightness according to ambient lighting or reduce it once it detects nobody is in front of the screen.

Moreover, there’s a built-in 2MP webcam with Windows Hello support.

Design & Connectivity

Philips 329P1H Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is robust and offers full ergonomic support with up to 180mm height adjustment, +/- 90° pivot, +/- 180° swivel, -5°/25° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports, USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode, 90W PD), RJ45, four downstream USB 3.0 ports (one with 7.5W fast-charging), a headphone jack and dual 5W integrated speakers.

Alternatives

If you want something a bit better, we recommend the Dell U3223QE.

The Pros:

  • Decent pixel density
  • Accurate colors, wide viewing angles
  • Ergonomic stand
  • 90W PD, eight USB ports, KVM

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)
  • BGR subpixel layout
  • Expensive
  • sRGB gamut only

About The Monitor

Interested in a big 43″ 4K display with built-in docking? The Dell U4323QE is the best model available. Although it has plenty of useful features, it also has a few downsides you should keep in mind.

Image Quality

The 4K UHD resolution looks very sharp even on 43″ sized screens as you get a decent pixel density of 103.6 PPI.

Sadly, just like all 43″ displays, the U4323QE has a BGR subpixel layout, which causes noticeable fringing on small text and fine details in most applications. Some users won’t be bothered by this, while others will find it deal-breaking.

Next, the monitor only covers the basic sRGB color space, but if you prefer accurate colors, the good news is that it won’t have any over-saturation.

The peak brightness is decent at 350-nits, while the contrast ratio is standard for IPS monitors at 1,000:1.

Design & Connectivity

Dell U4323DW Design

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 60mm, tilt by -5°/10°, +/- 20° swivel and 100x100mm or 200x200mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two DP 1.4 inputs, two HDMI 2.0 ports, USB-C with DP Alt Mode and 90W PD, three upstream USB-C ports, one downstream USB-C port, four downstream USB-A ports, a headphone jack, dual 8W integrated speakers and RJ45. It also has PiP/PbP support and built-in KVM.

Alternatives

If you really want a 43″ 4K display and the U4323QE is too expensive for you, consider the Samsung M70B – it’s a 43″ 4K VA monitor with built-in Tizen OS. It doesn’t have an RJ45 port, but it has WiFi/Bluetooth, USB-C (65W PD) and a USB hub for just ~$400. It has the same BGR subpixel layout though (like all 43″ displays).

The Pros:

  • Decent pixel density
  • Accurate colors, wide viewing angles
  • Ergonomic stand
  • 90W PD, four USB ports, KVM

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

Ultrawide monitors offer extra horizontal screen space for a wider field of view in games and more screen real estate for your spreadsheets and office-related apps.

Image Quality

The LG 34WQ75C is based on an IPS panel with the standard sRGB color gamut, a 1,000:1 contrast ratio and a 300-nit peak brightness.

The 34″ 21:9 screen is basically a 27″ 16:9 display that’s ~33% wider. It has a resolution of 3440×1440 hitting the pixel density sweet spot of 110 PPI.

This means that you’ll have plenty of screen space with sharp details and text without having to apply any scaling.

Features

Other features include Black Stabilizer (improves visibility in dark scenes) and advanced image adjustment tools, such as hue/saturation, sharpness and gamma presets.

Design & Connectivity

LG 34WQ75C Design

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 110mm, -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

The screen also has a subtle 3800R curvature for added immersion.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.4, USB-C (DP Alt Mode, 90W PD), RJ45, two USB 2.0 ports, two USB 3.0 ports, USB-B, a headphone jack and dual 7W built-in speakers.

The monitor also supports Picture by Picture and has an integrated KVM functionality.

Alternatives

If you want a better 34″ 3440×1440 monitor, check out the Dell U3423WE with an IPS Black panel with a 2,000:1 contrast ratio for deeper blacks, though it goes for ~$1,000.

The Pros:

  • Decent pixel density
  • High contrast ratio
  • Wide Color Gamut
  • Accurate colors, wide viewing angles
  • Fully ergonomic stand
  • 90W PD, eight USB ports, KVM

The Cons:

  • IPS glow (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

In case you want a larger ultrawide monitor with built-in docking, the Dell U3824DW is for you.

Image Quality

With a 38″ ultrawide monitor, you get the same height as that of a 32″ 16:9 display, but with around 33% extra horizontal screen space. The U3824DW has a screen resolution of 3840×1600, which results in a high pixel density of 111 PPI.

Moreover, the monitor supports a wide color gamut with 98% DCI-P3 color space coverage, it is factory-calibrated (Delta E < 2) and has dedicated sRGB, Rec.709 and DCI-P3 color modes.

It uses an IPS Black panel with a high 2,000:1 contrast ratio for noticeably deeper blacks than that of standard IPS monitors. Other panel-related specifications include a 300-nit peak brightness and dithered 10-bit color depth support.

Features

The Dell U3824DW supports Picture in Picture, Picture by Picture and hue/saturation/sharpness image adjustment tools.

It also has an integrated KVM switch.

Design & Connectivity

Dell U3824DW Design

The stand of the monitor is robust and versatile with up to 120mm height adjustment, -5°/21° tilt, +/- 30° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility; the screen has a subtle 2300R curvature.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.1 ports, DisplayPort 1.4, USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode, 90W PD), an additional downstream USB-C port with 15W PD, two downstream USB-C ports, five downstream USB-A 10 Gbps ports, a headphone jack, RJ45 and dual 9W speakers.

Alternatives

The older Dell U3821DW model with a regular IPS panel can be found for ~$200 less when it’s on sale. It also has slightly different specifications (not as wide color gamut, 95% DCI-P3) and a quad-USB 3.0 hub (1 upstream type B and 4 downstream type A instead of 5 + 2 USB ports of the U3824DW).

The Pros:

  • High pixel density
  • Wide Color Gamut
  • Accurate colors, wide viewing angles
  • Fully ergonomic stand
  • 100W PD, four USB ports, KVM

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The HP Z40c G3 not only provides you with a bit larger screen than the Dell U3824DW, but you also get a higher resolution, a wider color gamut and additional useful features!

Image Quality

Thanks to its 5120×2160 resolution, the HP Z40c has a high pixel density of roughly 140 PPI (pixels per inch), which results in more screen space and sharper details and text in comparison to the Dell U3824DW.

The Z40c is basically a 32″ 4K monitor with ~33% extra width.

You also get a wide 98% DCI-P3 gamut coverage for vibrant colors, a decent 300-nit peak brightness and the standard 1,000:1 contrast ratio for IPS panels.

Design & Connectivity

HP Z40c Design

The Z40c has a subtle 2500R screen curvature for added immersion, while the stand offers height adjustment up to 150mm, swivel by +/- 30°, tilt by -5°/20° and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

There’s also a 13MP webcam, a built-in microphone and dual 5W speakers. Other connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, HDMI 2.0, Thunderbolt 3 input and output ports with 100W PD, RJ45 and four downstream USB-A 3.0 ports.

It also supports Picture by Picture and has an integrated KVM functionality via the HP Device Bridge software.

Alternatives

LG, Lenovo and Dell also have monitors based on the same panel, offering similar image quality and performance, but different features. Therefore, you can just pick between these displays according to your preference and budget. You can check out our full LG 40WP95C review for more details.

 LG 40WP95CLenovo P40W-20Dell U4021QWHP Z40C
Refresh Rate72Hz75Hz60Hz60Hz
FreeSyncYes (48-72Hz)N/AN/AN/A
Thunderbolt 41x Input 96W PD
1x Output (daisy-chain)
1x Input 96W PD
1x Output (daisy-chain)
N/AN/A
Thunderbolt 3N/AN/A1x Input 90W PD2x Input up to 100W
(165W PD total max)
Display Inputs1x DisplayPort 1.4
2x HDMI 2.0  
1x DisplayPort 1.4
1x HDMI 2.0

1x DisplayPort 1.4
2x HDMI 2.0
1x DisplayPort 1.4
1x HDMI 2.0
USB Ports2x USB-A4x USB-A
1x USB-B
1x USB-C (27W PD)
4x USB-A
1x USB-B
1x USB-C (15W PD)
4x USB-A
Other1x Headphone Jack
2x 10W Speakers
1x Headphone Jack
1x RJ45
1x Headphone Jack
1x RJ45
2x 9W Speakers
1x RJ45
2x 5W Speakers
1x Built-in Webcam
KVMLG Dual ControllerKVM Switch,
Lenovo eKVM7
KVM SwitchHP Device Bridge
PriceLG 40WP95CLenovo P40W-20Dell U4021QWHP Z40C

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio, decent pixel density, wide color gamut
  • Plenty of features
  • Ergonomic design
  • 90W PD, three USB ports, KVM

The Cons:

  • Minor ghosting in darker scenes in fast-paced games

About The Monitor

The ASUS XG49WCR is a 49″ super-ultrawide monitor with an aspect ratio of 32:9!

Image Quality

A 49″ 32:9 monitor is basically equivalent to two 27″ 16:9 monitors side by side, without the bezels in-between and since the ASUS XG49WCR has a screen resolution of 5120×1440, you also get the same ~108 PPI pixel density.

Further, the display offers rich and saturated colors with 90% DCI-P3 gamut coverage. Other specifications include a strong 550-nit peak brightness and a high 3,000:1 contrast ratio.

It even has a high 165Hz refresh rate and VRR support. The higher refresh rate is not only useful for games as just moving your cursor around and scrolling will feel a lot smoother as well.

Design & Connectivity

ASUS XG49WCR Design

The stand of the monitor offers -5°/20° tilt, +/- 8° swivel, 120mm height adjustment and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility, while the screen has a 1800R curvature for added immersion.

Connectivity options include USB-C with DP Alt Mode and 90W PD, DisplayPort 1.4, HDMI 2.0, a USB 3.0 hub (3 downstream + 1 upstream), RJ45, a headphone jack, a KVM switch and dual 5W integrated speakers.

Alternatives

  • AOC AG493UCX2 – A 49″ 5120×1440 165Hz curved VA monitor with USB-C (65W PD). However, its USB-C port is limited to 120Hz.

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio, decent pixel density, wide color gamut
  • Accurate colors, wide viewing angles
  • Plenty of features
  • Ergonomic design
  • 90W PD, eight USB ports, KVM

The Cons:

  • IPS glow (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The Dell U4924DW is the best ultrawide docking monitor – here’s why.

Image Quality

The 49″ 5120×1440 panel of the Dell U4924DW is based on an IPS Black panel, which in addition to its wide viewing angles, consistent image quality and a 98% DCI-P3 wide color gamut also has a high 2,000:1 contrast ratio for deeper blacks!

Further, it’s factory calibrated at Delta E < 2 for accurate colors right out of the box and has a decent 350-nit peak brightness.

You also get dedicated sRGB, Rec.709, DCI-P3 and Display P3 color modes and the Uniformity Compensation technology (improves image uniformity at a cost of contrast ratio).

Design & Connectivity

Dell U4924DW Design

The screen has a subtle 3800R curvature, while the stand offers height adjustment up to 120mm, +/- 170° swivel, -5°/21° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.1 ports, DisplayPort 1.4, USB-C with DP Alt Mode and 90W PD, a USB-C upstream port, two USB-C downstream ports, five USB-A downstream ports, a headphone jack, RJ45 and dual 9W built-in speakers.

All USB ports have 10 Gbps, and there’s a built-in KVM switch and PiP/PbP support.

Conclusion

Did you find the best docking monitor for you? Feel free to ask us anything in the comments below, and we’ll gladly help you pick the best model for you!

Overall, the ASUS VA24ECPSN and the Philips 279P1 offer excellent value for money, and depending on region and availability, you should consider the Dell models we mentioned as alternatives too.

As far as the mid-range models go, both the Philips 329P1H and the LG 34WQ75C are great options, depending on your preference.

We find that the Dell U4924DW and the HP Z40c are the absolute best docking monitors you can get right now, while the Dell U3824DW and the ASUS XG49WCR are also excellent models if you want something a bit more affordable.

Updates +

  • February 9, 2024:
    – Replaced the Samsung S95UA with the ASUS XG49WCR.
  • November 24, 2023:
    – Checked up on the guide to ensure that our picks are still the best options available.
  • November 10, 2023:
    – Replaced the Dell U3821DW with U3824DW.
  • May 18, 2023:
    – Replaced the ViewSonic VG3456 with the LG 34WQ75C.
    – Added the Dell U4924DW, the Dell U4323QE and the HP Z40c.
  • November 22, 2022:
    – Checked up on the guide to ensure that our picks are still the best options available.
  • October 22, 2022:
    – Added the ASUS VA24ECPSN.
  • May 8, 2022:
    – Replaced the Philips 499P9H with the Samsung S95UA.

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Rob Shafer

Rob is a software engineer with a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver. He now works full-time managing DisplayNinja while coding his own projects on the side.