The Best 4K 144Hz Monitors (Best HDMI 2.1 Monitors) – 2024 Reviews

Looking to buy a 4K 144Hz gaming monitor with or without HDMI 2.1? Check out the best models currently available!

If you want to use the full potential of your high-end PC rig or a gaming console, a 4K 144Hz gaming monitor will definitely put its powerful hardware to good use.

Although relatively new to the market, there are quite a few 4K 144Hz gaming monitors available, and we’ll make sure you pick the one most suited to you!

MonitorSizePanelVRR
27”IPSFreeSync
(G-SYNC Stable)
32”IPSFreeSync
(G-SYNC Unstable)
32”IPSFreeSync
(G-SYNC Stable)
43”VAFreeSync
(G-SYNC Unstable)
43"VAFreeSync
(G-SYNC Unstable)
27"IPSFreeSync
(G-SYNC Stable)
32"IPSFreeSync
(G-SYNC Stable)
32"VAFreeSync
(G-SYNC Unstable)
42"OLEDFreeSync
(G-SYNC Stable)
budget pick

Gigabyte M27U

Gigabyte M27U
  • Wide color gamut
  • Quick response time
  • DisplayHDR 600
best value

MSI G321CU

MSI G321CU Monitor
  • Wide color gamut
  • High contrast ratio
  • DisplayHDR 600
premium pick

LG OLED42C2

LG OLED42C2 TV
  • Wide color gamut
  • Infinite contrast ratio
  • Instantaneous response time

So, let’s see which 4K 144Hz gaming monitor is the best one for you based on your budget and preference regarding panel type, screen size, and other features!

Note that there are also a few upcoming 4K 144Hz monitors worth keeping an eye out for, all of which we’ll mention in the monitor reviews below.

We’ll include a few alternatives that might be worth considering as well, depending on region and availability. You can view our changelogs for this buying guide at the end of this guide.

The Pros:

  • Wide color gamut
  • Quick response time speed
  • Plenty of features, including VRR + MBR up to 160Hz
  • Height-adjustable stand, USB hub, KVM switch

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)
  • Design lacks pivot and swivel

About The Monitor

Although $450 might not look ‘budget’ to most gamers – if you want a 4K 144Hz gaming monitor, you’ll hardly find anything below $500. However, the Gigabyte M27U actually offers better performance and more features than many more expensive models.

Image Quality

The best thing about the M27U is that you’re not really giving up anything crucial for its lower price in comparison to the alternatives.

It’s based on an IPS panel with a wide 95% DCI-P3 color gamut for saturated and rich colors. Next, it has a quick 1ms GtG response time speed that eliminates ghosting behind fast-moving objects, making it ideal for fast-paced gaming.

4K UHD resolution looks incredibly sharp on 27″ sized screens with 163 PPI (pixels per inch), while the wide 178° viewing angles ensure that the image is perfect regardless of the angle you’re looking at the screen.

HDR is supported as well with VESA’s DisplayHDR 600 certification.

So, you’re not getting the ‘true HDR’ viewing experience for which the monitor would need a much higher peak brightness and many more dimming zones (and would hence also cost more at 4K UHD).

Still, thanks to the monitor’s wide color gamut, high 4K UHD resolution, and decent 600-nit peak brightness and 8-zone local dimming, some HDR scenes will look better.

The contrast ratio amounts to 1,000:1, as expected from an IPS monitor, meaning that blacks won’t be as deep as that of VA panels (~3,000:1 contrast ratio). However, there are no 4K 144Hz VA monitors available at this screen size anyway (only 43″ and 32″).

4:2:0 Color Format

Related:Chroma Subsampling – 4:4:4 vs 4:2:2 vs 4:2:0

On the PS5, HDMI 2.1 is limited to 4:2:0 chroma subsampling on this monitor, even though the PS5 has enough bandwidth for 4:2:2. So, small text displayed on colored backgrounds will look a bit smudgy, but for gaming, this won’t be an issue.

You don’t have to use chroma subsampling over HDMI when using the Xbox Series X or a graphics card with HDMI 2.1 thanks to DSC.

For the most part, this type of color compression isn’t bothersome for gaming. It’s mainly small text that gets affected and looks a bit smudgy when displayed on colored backgrounds. When just playing games at a normal viewing distance and not deliberately looking for compression artifacts, it looks perfectly fine.

For PC, you can also use DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC (Display Stream Compression) for visually lossless compression if you have a compatible GPU (AMD Navi, NVIDIA Turing, or newer).

Features

Moving on, the Gigabyte M27U supports a variable refresh rate (VRR) for tear-free gameplay up to 160FPS with a 48-160Hz range.

It’s certified as FreeSync Premium Pro and while it doesn’t have NVIDIA’s G-SYNC Compatible certification, VRR works with both AMD and GeForce cards without issues.

HDMI 2.1 VRR also provides a variable refresh rate for the PS5.

Next, Aim Stabilizer Sync is supported, which can reduce perceived motion blur at the cost of picture brightness by backlight strobing and can work at the same time as VRR.

Other features include Black Equalizer (improves visibility in darker scenes), custom crosshairs, a refresh rate tracker and an integrated KVM switch that allows you to control multiple devices connected to the screen via one set of keyboard/mouse.

Design & Connectivity

Gigabyte M27U Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers height adjustment up to 130mm, tilt by -5°/20 and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.1 ports, DisplayPort 1.4, a USB-C port with DP 1.4 Alt Mode and 18W PD, a USB hub (one upstream and three downstream ports), a headphone jack and dual 3W integrated speakers.

Alternatives

  • Acer XB283K KV – a 28″ 4K 144Hz IPS model with a USB-C port that also has 65W Power Delivery, but it can be up to $100 more expensive
  • Gigabyte M28U – Another popular 28″ 4K 144Hz gaming monitor with HDMI 2.1 and a $450 – $550 price tag. However, it has minor inverse ghosting at low refresh rates with VRR enabled.
  • LG 27GP950 / 27GP95R – A 27″ 4K 144Hz monitor with a bit wider 98% DCI-P3 color gamut and hardware calibration support. It’s more expensive, but can be found on sale for $600 – $700
  • LG 27GR93U – a newer version of the 27GP950, though it’s just as expensive yet it has worse specs: DisplayHDR 400 and 95% DCI-P3

Based on this, we highly recommend getting the M27U, especially if you can find it at its lowest $470 price. The other models are only worth considering if the M27U is not available or overpriced – or if the other models are on a big sale. The XB283K KV is worth the extra price if you have a compatible laptop you’d want to charge.

NOTE

Keep in mind that the Acer XV275K P3 27″ 4K 160Hz IPS gaming monitor with a 576-zone mini LED FALD backlight can be found on sale for $550.

The Pros:

  • Wide color gamut
  • High contrast ratio
  • Plenty of features, including VRR + MBR up to 144Hz

The Cons:

  • Minor ghosting in fast-paced games, mainly in darker scenes
  • Tilt-only stand

About The Monitor

If you want a bigger 4K 144Hz gaming monitor, the MSI G321CU is the cheapest model available. It has a VA panel, which has its advantages and disadvantages.

Image Quality

The VA panel of the MSI G321CU provides you with a high 3,000:1 static contrast ratio for noticeably deeper blacks than that of IPS monitors. You also won’t get IPS glow, so the viewing experience is overall more immersive, especially in dark rooms.

The MSI G321CU monitor also has a decent 300-nit peak brightness and a 91% DCI-P3 wide color gamut coverage for vibrant colors (sRGB mode is available too).

Sadly, just like most VA panel displays, the G321CU has a slow pixel response time speed, which results in noticeable trailing behind fast-moving objects.

It’s mainly noticeable in dark scenes and some users might not be bothered by it at all, but if you’re sensitive to ghosting and smearing or play a lot of fast-paced games competitively, you should pick another display.

Features

Another disadvantage of VA panels is that they’re prone to VRR brightness flickering. When using VRR, you will be able to notice jumps in brightness in some games, mainly around the 48FPS LFC threshold and in games with fluctuating frame rates.

Some users are more sensitive than others to this issue as well, but you can just disable VRR in games where the brightness flickering is noticeable and put up with screen tearing.

The MSI G321CU also supports MPRT-Sync, which uses backlight strobing to reduce perceived motion blur at a cost of picture brightness – and it can work at the same time as VRR.

Other useful features include Night Vision (improves visibility in dark scenes), smart crosshair overlays (crosshair changes color depending on the scenes for better visibility), Optix Scope (zooms in the area around your crosshair), on-screen timers, a refresh rate tracker and PiP/PbP.

Design & Connectivity

MSI G321CU Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is tilt-only, but the screen supports 100x100mm VESA mounting and has a moderate 1500R curvature for added immersion.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.1 ports, DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, USB-C (DP Alt Mode, 15W PD) and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

  • Gigabyte M32UC – based on the same panel, but has a height-adjustable stand, a USB hub and a KVM switch for ~$100 more
  • Acer XV322QK V, ASUS VG32UQA1A – 32″ 4K 144Hz gaming monitor with a flat-screen VA panel

The Pros:

  • Wide color gamut
  • Quick response time speed
  • Plenty of features, including VRR + MBR up to 144Hz
  • Height-adjustable stand and rich connectivity options, KVM switch

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

Want a 32″ 4K 144Hz monitor, but don’t want to deal with slow response times and VRR brightness flickering? The Gigabyte M32U is the most cost-efficient IPS model!

Image Quality

Thanks to its IPS panel, the M32U offers 178° wide viewing angles with consistent and vibrant colors, covering 90% of the DCI-P3 color space. It also has a decent 350-nit peak brightness and a fast pixel response time speed for no prominent ghosting.

VRR is supported up to 144Hz for smooth tear-free gameplay, while other features include Aim Stabilizer Sync (simultaneous VRR and MBR), Black Equalizer, Color Vibrance, crosshair overlays, on-screen timers, a refresh rate tracker and PiP/PbP.

Just like the MSI G321CU, the M32U supports HDR, but without an OLED panel or a proper FALD (full-array local dimming) backlight, HDR is mostly useless.

Check out our full Gigabyte M32U review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Gigabyte M32U Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 130mm, tilt by -5°/20°, +/- 30° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DP 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports (24 Gbps and DSC), USB-C with DP Alt Mode and 18W PD, two 3W built-in speakers, a headphone jack, a USB hub (1 upstream + 3 downstream) and a built-in KVM switch.

Alternatives

  • Gigabyte Aorus FI32U – the same monitor, but with some premium features (better design, RGB lighting and a microphone jack) for up to $200 more. However, it can sometimes be found on sale for the same price as the M32U, so it’s worth checking out.
  • MSI MPG321UR-QD – a 32″ 4K 144Hz IPS monitor with a wide Adobe RGB color gamut, DisplayHDR 600 and KVM. It’s more expensive and has a bit slower response time speed though
  • LG 32GQ950 – a 32″ 4K 144Hz IPS monitor with a wider color gamut and an A-TW polarizer, which helps with IPS glow, but it goes for up to $1,300. It’s worth considering if you can find it on sale for ~$900 and don’t care about HDR
  • LG 32GR93U – the newer version of the 32GQ950, but it has a lower brightness, no A-TW polarizer and only DisplayHDR 400 for $750 – $800

The Pros:

  • High peak brightness
  • Wide color gamut
  • High contrast ratio
  • Plenty of features, including FreeSync and MBR up to 144Hz
  • Rich connectivity options, KVM switch

The Cons:

  • Minor ghosting in fast-paced games, mainly in darker scenes
  • BGR subpixel layout
  • Underwhelming HDR image quality despite DisplayHDR 1000 certification

About The Monitor

Need an even larger 4K 144Hz monitor with HDMI 2.1? Gigabyte has you covered with the FV43U!

Image Quality

The Gigabyte Aorus FV43U is based on a 42.5″ VA panel, so you won’t get as fast response time or wide viewing angles as the IPS models, but you get a higher contrast ratio for deeper blacks!

Due to its slower pixel response time speed, you will be able to notice some ghosting behind fast-moving objects, especially in darker scenes.

However, the FV43U isn’t intended for fast-paced competitive gaming – first of all, due to its huge 43″ screen size. Instead, it excels at providing an immersive viewing and gaming experience.

Of course, it still has low input lag, so you won’t be able to notice any delays between your actions and the result on the screen, allowing you to enjoy casual fast-paced competitive gaming, where the minor ghosting here and there won’t bother you either.

The high 4,000:1 static contrast ratio of the monitor allows for deep blacks and striking details in the shadows of the picture, while the stellar 1,000-nit peak brightness ensures vivid highlights.

On top of that, the Gigabyte FV43U has a wide 99% Adobe RGB color gamut (97% DCI-P3, ~150% sRGB) for exceptionally vibrant colors!

It also supports local dimming, but you’re still not in the ‘true HDR’ category as there are only a few dimming zones. Still, thanks to its wide color gamut, high contrast and strong peak brightness, HDR image will look great and significantly better than SDR.

The viewing angles aren’t quite as wide as that of IPS technology, so some minor shifts in brightness and contrast can be observed at skewed angles, but nothing extreme or that would take away from the overall viewing immersion.

4K resolution looks very good even on 42.5″ screens with roughly 104 pixels per inch, but if you plan on using the monitor for regular PC use, note that the FV43U has a BGR subpixel layout instead of the regular RGB.

This can make small text look a bit smudgy at native scaling, but there are ways to alleviate it. If you plan on using the screen for a lot of reading and typing, it won’t be ideal – but this is the case with all 43″ monitors and TVs.

Features

VRR is supported via AMD FreeSync Premium Pro and NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatible (though there’s no official certification) within the 48-144Hz range. Some units might be affected by the VRR brightness flickering issue.

Other features include Aim Stabilizer Sync, Black Equalizer, various picture presets and custom crosshairs and timers.

Design & Connectivity

Gigabyte Aorus FV43U Monitor Design

The design is not ergonomic, but it supports VESA mount compatibility via the 200x200mm pattern.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports (4:2:0 at 4K 120Hz on the PS5), USB-C (with DP Alt Mode), a dual-USB 3.0 hub, a headphone jack, an audio line-out jack, two 12W built-in speakers and a KVM switch.

The Pros:

  • Decent peak brightness, wide color gamut; 360-zone mini LED FALD
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 144Hz
  • Rich connectivity options, built-in Tizen OS

The Cons:

  • Minor ghosting in fast-paced games, mainly in darker scenes
  • BGR subpixel layout
  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes

About The Monitor

If you want a 43″ display, but don’t want to deal with OLED’s limited brightness and risk of burn-in, the Samsung Odyssey Neo G7 S43CG70 is the best 43″ 4K LED-backlit high refresh rate gaming monitor available.

Image Quality

Even though the Gigabyte FV43U has DisplayHDR 1000 certification, the Samsung S43CG70 with DisplayHDR 600 actually offers a significantly better HDR image quality due to its 360-zone mini LED FALD backlight.

While it cannot reach 1,000-nits, it goes up to 700-nits for small highlights and can maintain ~450-nits for a full white window, which along with its full-array local dimming creates a much better HDR image quality.

The Samsung S43CG70 has a 95% DCI-P3 gamut coverage, so it won’t have as vibrant colors as that of the FV43U.

For the best HDR image quality, however, you should consider the LG 42C2 with an OLED panel due to its per-pixel dimming as all FALD displays have noticeable blooming in demanding scenes. The Samsung S43CG70 is only worth considering if you’re worried about burn-in and need a high peak brightness for everyday use.

As it’s the case with most VA panel monitors, the S43CG70 is prone to VRR brightness flickering and it has a slow pixel response time speed, resulting in noticeable smearing in dark scenes.

The monitor also has Samsung’s Tizen OS with streaming applications, DeX, Microsoft 365, Bixby voice assistant, etc. Other supported features include UltraWide Game View (changes the resolution to 3840×1600 21:9), crosshair overlays and various picture presets.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung S43CG70 Monitor Design

The stand is tilt-only by -3°/20°, but the screen is 200x200mm VESA mount compatible. The screen has a matte anti-glare coating that eliminates reflections without making the image too grainy.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.1 ports, DP 1.4 with DSC, a dual-USB 3.0 hub, RJ45, WiFi, Bluetooth and dual 20W speakers. You also get a remote controller.

The Pros:

  • High peak brightness, wide color gamut; 1152-zone mini LED FALD
  • Quick response time speed
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 144Hz
  • Fully ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options, including KVM and USB-C with 90W PD

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes
  • Clunky OSD buttons

About The Monitor

For proper HDR support, we highly recommend the Innocn 27M2V if you want a 27″ 4K high refresh rate monitor.

Image Quality

The 27M2V is based on an IPS panel with a wide 99% DCI-P3 and 99% Adobe RGB color gamut for vibrant colors.

Further, it has an 1152-zone mini LED FALD backlight for incredible HDR image quality. When watching HDR content, the peak brightness can go a bit over 1,200-nits for punchy highlights while at the same time the screen can dim parts of the image that are supposed to be dark for inky blacks!

Other panel-related specifications are similar to that of the M27U and include a 1,000:1 static contrast ratio, a fast 1ms GtG response time speed and 178° viewing angles.

The 27″ sized screen is slightly smaller, but it also has a slightly higher pixel density of 163 PPI.

Features

The Innocn 27M2V supports a variable refresh rate for tear-free gameplay up to 144FPS. Other features include various picture presets, Shadow Balance, PiP/PbP and crosshair overlays.

Check out our Innocn 27M2V review for more details.

Design & Connectivity

Innocn 27M2V Design

The monitor has a sturdy and ergonomic stand with up to 120mm height adjustment, +/- 15° swivel, 90° pivot, 15° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 inputs with full 48 Gbps, USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode, 90W PD), a dual-USB 3.0 hub, a headphone jack, dual 5W integrated speakers and built-in KVM functionality.

Alternatives

If the Innocn 27M2V is not available in your region, check out the Redmagic 4K Gaming Monitor with the same panel and local dimming solution.

In case neither is available and you want a 27″ 4K HDR display, you’ll have to settle with the Cooler Master Tempest GP27U, the KTC M27P20 Pro or the Acer XV275K P3 as an alternative. These three displays use the same panel with a fewer 576-zone FALD backlight yet they cost around the same as the 1152-zone models.

The Acer XV275K P3 model can be found on sale for $600, so it’s worth considering if you want to save ~$200 and don’t mind the lower local dimming zone count.

The Pros:

  • High peak brightness, wide color gamut; 576-zone mini LED FALD
  • Fast response time, low input lag
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 160FPS
  • Ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options, including USB-C with 90W PD and KVM

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes

About The Monitor

In case you want a 32″ 4K 144Hz gaming monitor with true HDR support, you’re going to love the Acer Predator X32FP!

Image Quality

Even though it has a larger screen and fewer dimming zones than the Innocn 27M2V, the Acer X32FP still manages to deliver an immersive HDR viewing experience thanks to its 576-zone mini LED FALD, 1200-nit peak brightness and wide 99% Adobe RGB color gamut.

It will naturally have more blooming than the Innocn 27M2V, but considering that this is an unavoidable drawback of this technology and that it mainly occurs in particularly demanding scenes, it’s tolerable.

Alternatively, consider the Innocn 32M2V model. It has 1152 dimming zones for less blooming, but it doesn’t have as fast response time speed as the Predator X32FP, and unlike Acer’s model, it has flickering issues when using local dimming and VRR at the same time. The 32M2V can be found for $850 – $1,000, so it’s definitely worth considering too.

Moving on, the Acer X32FP supports VRR up to 160Hz for tear-free gameplay and offers plenty of additional features, such as Black Boost, a refresh rate tracker, crosshair overlays and various picture presets.

Check out our full Acer X32FP review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Acer Predator X32 FP Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is robust with up to 130mm height adjustment, -5°/35° tilt, +/- 30° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include four HDMI 2.1 ports with 48 Gbps, DP 1.4 with DSC, USB-C with DP Alt Mode and 90W PD, a quad-USB 3.0 hub, a headphone jack, dual 7W built-in speakers and integrated KVM functionality.

Alternatives

  • Innocn 32M2V – goes for $850 – $1000 and has an 1152-zone mini LED FALD, but it has a slower response time speed than the X32FP and VRR performance is not as smooth
  • ASUS PG32UQXR – based on the same panel as the Acer X32FP. However, it’s usually $300 more expensive and although it has DisplayPort 2.1, the DP 1.4 does just fine on the X32FP thanks to DSC, which is a visually lossless compression.
  • ASUS PG32UQX, ViewSonic XG321UG – 32″ 4K 144Hz models with DisplayHDR 1400, 1152-zone mini LED FALD and G-SYNC Ultimate. However, they lack HDMI 2.1 and have slower pixel response time speed yet go for ~$2,500

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio, wide color gamut
  • High peak brightness, 1196-zone mini LED FALD
  • Quick response time
  • Plenty of features, including VRR and MBR up to 165Hz
  • Fully ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming (in very demanding scenes)
  • The aggressive 1000R screen curvature won’t appeal to some gamers
  • VRR performance not ideal

About The Monitor

In comparison to the Acer X32FP, the Samsung Odyssey Neo G7 S32BG75 has a VA panel with a higher native contrast ratio and more dimming zones (1196) for significantly less blooming. However, it doesn’t have as smooth VRR performance and a lot of users don’t like its aggressive 1000R screen curvature.

Image Quality

Based on a VA panel with a high native contrast ratio and an 1196-zone mini LED FALD solution, the Neo G7 delivers deep blacks with minimal blooming.

Additionally, it has a high peak brightness of around 1,200-nits for punchy highlights, while the 95% DCI-P3 gamut coverage ensures vibrant colors.

The Neo G7 is also one of the rare VA panel displays with a rapid 1ms GtG response time speed for no ghosting/smearing in fast-paced games.

VRR is supported via HDMI 2.1, FreeSync Premium Pro and G-SYNC Compatible technologies, and although there’s no official NVIDIA certification, you get a smooth performance. In case you get some brightness flickering, you can enable the VRR Control option to prevent it, though this adds some input lag and micro-stutter.

Check out our full Neo G7 review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung S32BG75 Review

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 120mm, +/- 15° swivel, +/- 90° pivot, -9°/13° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Some users hate the aggressive 1000R screen curvature, some love it and some get used to it and forget it’s even there – so, it all comes down to personal preference.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.1 ports with 40 Gbps and DSC, DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio, wide color gamut, high peak brightness
  • Noticeably brighter than the 48C1 in SDR mode
  • No backlight bleed or IPS/VA glow
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 120Hz and Dolby Vision
  • Quick response time speed
  • HDMI 2.1, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Risk of permanent image burn-in and temporary image retention
  • Not as bright as some high-end LED-backlit TVs
  • Glossy screen surface causes mirror-like reflections (but the image quality is more vivid)

About The Display

While there are excellent 1440p and ultrawide OLED gaming monitors, if you want a 4K 144Hz display, the LG OLED42C2 TV is your best bet!

Image Quality

OLED displays don’t rely on a backlight to produce an image. Instead, each pixel emits its own light. As a result, you get a basically infinite contrast ratio with true blacks as pixels can simply turn off when displaying black.

Further, there’s no backlight bleeding, IPS glow or blooming visual artifacts, which makes for an incredible HDR viewing experience, especially in dark rooms.

Next, the pixel response time speed is instantaneous. So, there’s no ghosting or overshoot behind fast-moving objects, regardless of the refresh rate.

You also get smooth VRR performance and although there’s some near-black gamma shift in dark scenes, it’s not as noticeable as VRR brightness flickering on VA panels.

The main disadvantage of OLED displays is the risk of burn-in when showing an image with bright static elements for too long. However, as long as you’re using the monitor sensibly and taking advantage of the available burn-in prevention features, it shouldn’t be an issue.

OLED displays also can’t get as bright as LED-backlit panels. The LG OLED42C2 is limited to around 180-nits in SDR. For some users, this is bright enough under normal lighting conditions, but others might find it too dim. For HDR, the screen can reach up to 700-nits for small highlights, which is enough to create a vivid and punchy viewing experience.

While the 4K UHD resolution looks sharp even on 42″ sized screens, LG’s W-OLED panels use an RWBG subpixel layout, which causes minor fringing on small text and fine details, but it’s not noticeable in games and videos.

The LG OLED42C2 also has a wide 98% DCI-P3 gamut coverage for rich colors and 178° viewing angles, which means that the image remains flawless regardless of the angle you’re looking at it.

Finally, the TV uses LG’s WebOS 22 for smooth navigation through streaming apps and you get the Magic Remote controller. Other features include various picture presets, 21:9 and 32:9 Wide Aspect Ratio, Black Stabilizer, Google and Alexa voice assistance and even Dolby Vision support.

Check out our LG OLED42C2 review for more details.

Design & Connectivity

LG OLED42C2 TV Design

The design of the TV features two legs, making it more practical for regular desktop use, but there are no ergonomic abilities apart from VESA mount compatibility.

Note that the screen has a glossy screen finish, which makes the image more vivid, but it also makes it more reflective. It won’t be an issue as long as there’s no strong lighting directly hitting the screen.

Connectivity options are identical to the C1 series and include four HDMI 2.1 ports, three USB ports, RJ45, a tuner, composite-in, analog and digital audio ports and WiFi/Bluetooth.

Alternatives

  • ASUS PG42UQ – based on the same panel with a 138Hz overclocked refresh rate, DisplayPort input, matte anti-glare coating and a heatsink for slightly higher brightness. However, it goes for $1400, while the LG OLED42C2 can be found for as low as $850. The PG42UQ also doesn’t have any smart features or Dolby Vision support. If you want a model with a matte anti-glare coating, consider the KTC G42P5, which can be found for ~$1,100.

Conclusion

Did you find the best 4K 144Hz gaming monitor for you? Leave us a comment below if you’re not sure which one to pick!

Overall, the Innocn 27M2V offers great value for money and will completely satisfy most gamers. If you want a larger screen, both the Samsung Neo G7 and the Acer Predator X32FP are excellent options as well.

If you don’t mind its size, the LG OLED42C2 is an exceptional gaming display for the money.

Now, in case you just want a good SDR display, all of the included models will do just fine, depending on your preference regarding panel type and screen size, but we find that the Gigabyte M27U and the MSI G321CU offer the best value for money.

Updates +

  • November 2, 2023:
    – Replaced the Acer XB283KKV with the Gigabyte M27U.
  • March 16, 2023:
    – Replaced the Tempest GP27U with the Innocn 27M2V.
    – Added the Acer X32FP, the MSI G321CU, the Gigabyte M32U and the Samsung S43CG70.
    – Removed the LG OLED48C1, the ASUS PG42UQ, the ASUS PG32UQX and the LG 32GQ950.
  • November 22, 2022:
    – Checked up on the guide to ensure that our picks are still the best options available.
  • November 9, 2022:
    – Replaced the Sony Inzone M9 with the Cooler Master Tempest GP27U.
  • September 16, 2022:
    – Added the ASUS PG42UQ.
  • August 30, 2022:
    – Added the Samsung Neo G7.
    – Replaced the MSI MPG321UR-QD with the LG 32GQ950.
  • July 5, 2022:
    – Replaced the LG 27GP950 with the Sony Inzone M9.
  • April 21, 2022:
    – Added the LG OLED42C2.
  • February 8, 2022:
    – Replaced the Gigabyte M28U with the Acer XB283K KV.
  • December 16, 2021:
    – Checked up on the guide to ensure that our picks are still the best options available.

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Rob Shafer

Rob is a software engineer with a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver. He now works full-time managing DisplayNinja while coding his own projects on the side.