The Best Monitors For FPS Games (2024 Reviews)

Looking for the best monitor for FPS games such as Call of Duty and Fortnite? View the best 360Hz, 240Hz, 144Hz, and FreeSync/G-SYNC/MBR monitors out there!

Looking for the best monitor for FPS games such as Overwatch, Fortnite, Call of Duty, Battlefield and CS: GO?

You’ve come to the right place, as in this buying guide you’ll find only the fastest displays.

We included various models allowing you to pick the ideal one for you according to your budget, PC configuration and personal preference — but rest assured that each of our picks offers the best value for the money in its respective category!

TypeMonitorSizePanelResolutionRefresh RateMBR 
Best 144Hz - 180Hz Monitors For FPS Games24”IPS1920x1080165HzYes
27”IPS2560x1440180HzYes
24”IPS2560x1440165HzNo
Best 240Hz Monitors For FPS Games24”IPS1920x1080240HzYes
27"VA2560x1440240HzNo
27"IPS2560x1440240HzYes
Best 360Hz Monitors For FPS Games25"IPS1920x1080390HzYes
25"TN1920x1080360HzYes
27"IPS2560x1440360HzYes
27"OLED2560x1440360HzNo
Best 480Hz+ Monitors For FPS Games24"TN1920x1080540HzYes
32"OLED3840x21604K 240Hz
(1080p 480Hz)
No
best overall

MSI MPG 271QRX

MSI MPG 271QRX Monitor
  • Instantaneous response time
  • VRR up to 360Hz
  • Infinite contrast ratio, wide color gamut, 1440p
budget pick

ViewSonic XG2431

ViewSonic XG2431
  • Fast response time
  • VRR and MBR up to 240Hz
  • Affordable
premium pick

ASUS PG248QP

ASUS ROG Swift Pro PG248QP
  • Fast response time
  • MBR and VRR up to 540Hz
  • Wide color gamut

We’ll cover everything you need to know about these gaming monitors in the summaries below, but feel free to leave us a comment below if you need more assistance.

Additionally, you may want to visit our how to choose the right gaming monitor guide for more information.

Continue reading to ensure that you’re buying a gaming monitor with the right panel type, screen size, resolution and refresh rate for your gaming habits.

You can view our changelogs for this buying guide at the end of this article.

Best 144Hz Gaming Monitors For FPS Games

While there is a noticeable difference between 144Hz and 240Hz, the jump isn’t nearly as obvious as it is between 60Hz and 144Hz.

So, many gamers still opt for 144Hz models because they are cheaper and more viable at higher resolutions such as 1440p.

The Pros:

  • FreeSync and MBR up to 165Hz
  • Plenty of gaming features
  • Vibrant colors and wide viewing angles
  • Ergonomic design

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)
  • Design lacks pivot option

About The Monitor

The BenQ EX240 is one the cheapest 24″ 1080p 144Hz IPS gaming monitors with a rapid pixel response time speed, variable refresh rate and backlight strobing support, providing you with everything you need for smooth fast-paced gameplay.

Image Quality

It’s based on an IPS panel with a 350-nit peak brightness and a 1,000:1 contrast ratio meaning that the monitor can get more than bright enough under normal lighting conditions, while blacks aren’t quite as deep as that of VA technology, but those panels have other disadvantages at this price range, mainly a slower response time speed.

It has a 115% sRGB color gamut volume for a bit of extra color vibrancy.

Further, IPS panels also ensure 178° wide viewing angles both horizontally and vertically meaning that the picture won’t degrade in quality regardless of the angle you’re looking at the screen.

The fast response time speed ensures that there’s no ghosting behind fast-moving objects, allowing you to play FPS games without any distractions.

Features

The monitor supports AMD FreeSync with a 48-165Hz VRR range for tear-free gameplay, and it works without issues with NVIDIA cards even though it’s not officially certified.

In addition, there’s the Motion Blur Reduction backlight strobing technology for even smoother motion clarity at the cost of picture brightness.

Other noteworthy features include various pre-calibrated picture presets and Black eQualizer, which enhances visibility in darker games.

Visit our BenQ EX240 review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

BenQ Mobiuz EX240 Review

The monitor also has a sturdy and ergonomic stand with up to 100mm height adjustment, +/- 15° swivel, -5°/15° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.2, a headphone jack, dual 2.5W integrated speakers and a dual-USB 3.0 hub. The 1080p 120Hz mode is supported for the PS5 and Xbox consoles.

Alternatives

The prices of these budget monitors often fluctuate, so feel free to leave us a comment below. We also have a list of all 24″ 1080p ~144Hz IPS monitors available.

The Pros:

  • Plenty of gaming features, including VRR and MBR up to 180Hz
  • Vibrant colors and wide viewing angles
  • High pixel density
  • Ergonomic stand

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The Acer XV271UM3 features a higher screen resolution as well as a fast 1ms GtG response time speed for both remarkable visuals and smooth motion clarity.

Image Quality

Here’s the kicker: 1440p results in a perfect pixel-per-inch (PPI) ratio on 27″ monitors. You get around 108 PPI meaning that there will be plenty of screen space available while the details are sharp and clear without any scaling necessary.

It’s also more demanding to drive, so make sure your PC configuration will be able to handle it.

Just like with the BenQ EX240, you get wide viewing angles, while the response time is swift and eliminates all visible ghosting and motion blur.

It has a bit wider color gamut (95% DCI-P3 gamut coverage, or ~125% sRGB gamut size), so colors are more vibrant and saturated. The extra shade variety is helpful as it can make enemies stand out more in certain environments.

Features

The Acer XV271U M3 supports AMD FreeSync with a 48-180Hz range over DisplayPort and 48-144Hz over HDMI, and offers stable G-SYNC compatible performance.

Other features include Black Boost (increases visibility of objects lurking in shadows), customizable crosshair overlays and pre-calibrated picture presets.

Visit our Acer XV271U M3 review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Acer XV271U M3bmiiprx Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor offers full ergonomic support with up to 120mm height adjustment, 360° swivel, -5°/25° tilt, 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports, dual 2W built-in speakers and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

There are plenty of excellent 27″ 1440p high refresh rate IPS gaming monitors available nowadays ranging from $200 to $250 (depending on sale).

So, we recommend checking them all out and choosing whichever is the cheapest or according to your design/feature preference:

If you’d want a bigger 32″ gaming monitor, check out the Sceptre E325B-QPN168 1440p 144Hz IPS display with a wide color gamut and FreeSync.

However, for most people, 32″ monitors are too big for regular desktop use, let alone competitive FPS gaming as you’d need to sit quite far away from the screen in order to be able to see the whole image without moving your eyes.

If you still want a 32″ model, check out the LG 32GQ850 and the MSI MPG 321URX. We also included a 32″ 4K 240Hz OLED monitor with a 1080p 480Hz Dual Mode later in the article, the LG 32GS95UE.

The Pros:

  • Plenty of gaming features, including VRR up to 165Hz
  • Accurate colors and wide viewing angles
  • High pixel density
  • Ergonomic stand

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

If you want a 24″ sized screen for FPS gaming, but with a higher resolution, the Koorui GP01 is for you!

Image Quality

As we’ve already mentioned, most competitive FPS players prefer ~24″ sized screens, but some are repelled by the low 1080p resolution.

The Koorui GP01 is one of the rare 24″ models that has a 2560×1440 resolution for much sharper text and details with 123 PPI.

It uses an IPS panel with a rapid 1ms GtG pixel response time speed, a decent 400-nit peak brightness, a 1000:1 contrast ratio and the standard sRGB color gamut.

It also supports VRR up to 165Hz and standard gaming features, such as crosshair overlays and on-screen timers.

Check out our full Koorui GP01 review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Koorui GP01 Design

The stand of the monitor offers full ergonomic support, including up to 110mm height adjustment, +/- 30° swivel, +/- 90° pivot, -5°/15° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.2, two HDMI 2.0 ports and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

There are two more 24″ 1440p high refresh rate IPS models, the AOC Q24G2A and the Philips 24M1N5500Z, but these aren’t available in the US.

Best 240Hz Gaming Monitors For FPS Games

While some 1080p 240Hz gaming monitors are even cheaper than certain 1080p 144Hz displays, keep in mind that you will need a more powerful CPU/GPU system to run games at such high frame rates.

The Pros:

  • Vibrant colors and wide viewing angles
  • Impeccable MBR technology
  • Plenty of gaming features
  • Fully ergonomic design and rich connectivity options

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

Do you want it all — a fast response time, 240Hz, Motion Blur Reduction, FreeSync, gorgeous colors and wide viewing angles of IPS?

The ViewSonic XG2431 is currently as close as you’ll get to the perfect monitor for competitive gaming!

Image Quality

We have standard IPS panel specifications, including a 400-nit peak brightness, a 1,000:1 contrast ratio, 8-bit color depth support, wide viewing angles, 1ms response time and an sRGB color gamut.

So, you get a bright image with vivid colors that don’t degrade at an angle.

Features

Moving on, the ViewSonic Elite XG2431 offers a bunch of useful gaming features, including AMD FreeSync support with a 48-240Hz VRR range with stable G-SYNC performance and excellent PureXP MBR technology that works from 60Hz up to 240Hz.

The ViewSonic XG2431 is the first monitor with the Blur Busters 2.0 Approved certification, which ensures exceptional backlight strobing performance with minimal strobe crosstalk or other visual artifacts.

You will also find plenty of other features, such as various picture presets and Black Stabilization.

Design & Connectivity

ViewSonic XG2431 Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and versatile with up to 120mm height adjustment, -5°/15° tilt, 90° pivot, +/- 90° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.4, a headphone jack, dual 3W integrated speakers and a USB 3.0 hub (2 downstream + 1 upstream).

Alternatives

In case the XG2431 is not available, check out the ASUS XG249CM. It has some extra features, such as USB-C (15W PD), KVM and ELMB-Sync (MBR + VRR at the same time), but it’s MBR implementation is not as good. It goes for $200 – $330.

Another alternative worth considering is the Acer XV252QZ if you can find it on sale for ~$200. It has MBR, but again, not as well-optimized as that of the XG2431.

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio and pixel density
  • Wide color gamut
  • Plenty of features including VRR up to 240Hz
  • Fully ergonomic stand

The Cons:

  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

The Innocn 27G1S is the first flat-screen VA-panel display to deliver a rapid 1ms GtG pixel response time speed allowing you to enjoy both a high 3,000:1 contrast ratio and smooth motion clarity. 

Image Quality

Now, even though the Innocn 27G1S has a specified pixel response time of 1ms GtG, it’s still not quite as fast as some IPS or TN panel monitors. Some transitions of dark pixels into brighter shades won’t quite make it in time with the 240Hz refresh rate, which can cause some minor smearing in dark scenes with fast-moving objects.

Regardless, this isn’t really noticeable unless you’re deliberately looking for it, but if you want perfect performance for competitive gaming, you should be getting a 1080p 240Hz display anyway for the highest FPS and lowest input lag.

The Innocn 27G1S is for those who want very good performance for FPS games as well as an immersive picture quality with high contrast ratio for deep and vivid blacks.

On top of that, the Innocn 27G1S also offers a wide 90% DCI-P3 gamut for vibrant colors and a decent 350-nit peak brightness.

Features

VRR is supported up to 240Hz, but as it’s the case with most high refresh rate VA gaming monitors, there’s noticeable brightness flickering in certain scenes, such as in-game menus, loading screens and games with fluctuating frame rates.

Other features include custom crosshairs, Shadow Balance, on-screen timers and various picture presets.

Design & Connectivity

Innocn 27G1S Design

The stand offers up to 120mm height adjustment, -5°/20° tilt, 90° pivot, +/- 30° swivel and VESA mount compatibility (100x100mm).

Connectivity options include two DisplayPort 1.4 inputs, two HDMI 2.0 ports (max 1440p 144Hz) and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

Note that the Innocn 27G1S is also available on Amazon, but if it’s out of stock, the link will lead you to the Innocn 27G1R with a 144Hz panel instead. The 27G1S price ranges from $270 to $440, so make sure to get it when it’s on sale.

Samsung’s Odyssey G6 and G7 models also offer a fast 1440p 240Hz VA panel with a bit better (though not proper) HDR image quality. However, they’re significantly more expensive and have a steep 1000R screen curvature that a lot of users dislike.

The Pros:

  • Fast response time speed
  • MBR and VRR up to 240Hz
  • High pixel density, wide color gamut
  • Height-adjustable stand and rich connectivity options

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

Looking for a 27″ 1440p 240Hz gaming monitor with better colors and viewing angles? The HP Omen 27qs is for you!

Image Quality

Thanks to its IPS panel with a wide color gamut, the HP Omen 27qs offers truly striking colors with a 95% DCI-P3 gamut coverage. It also has an sRGB mode allowing you to clamp the gamut for accurate sRGB color representation.

The monitor has a specified peak brightness of 400-nits and a static contrast ratio of 1,000:1, so the HDR picture isn’t anything to write home about, but this is clearly not its main selling point.

Features

The HP Omen 27qs supports AMD FreeSync for tear-free gameplay up to 240FPS and offers flawless G-SYNC Compatible performance despite not having official certification.

It also supports MPRT backlight strobing technology.

Other features include various picture modes, Black Stretch, on-screen crosshairs and a refresh rate tracker.

Check out our full HP Omen 27qs review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

HP Omen 27qs Design

The stand is sturdy and offers height adjustment up to 100mm, -5°/20° tilt, 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports (limited to 144Hz), a headphone jack, dual 3W built-in speakers and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

There are a few 1440p 300Hz models available too, such as the ASUS XG27AQMR and the Acer XV272UKF, but we find that the extra 60Hz and the still underwhelming HDR-600 support are not worth almost double the price of the HP 27qs.

Best 360Hz Gaming Monitors For FPS Games

The jump to 360Hz from 240Hz might not be noticeable enough to an average gamer to justify the higher price, but to a hardcore FPS player, it’s a worthy upgrade.

The Pros:

  • Fast response time speed
  • Plenty of extra features including FreeSync and MBR up to 390Hz
  • Fully ergonomic stand

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

If you want the fastest gaming monitor, you want the Acer XV252QF.

Image Quality

This 360Hz gaming monitor is based on an IPS panel with basically identical specifications to that of the 240Hz models.

What does this mean for you? You’re getting the same viewing experience with a 1,000:1 contrast ratio, a 400-nit peak brightness, 178° viewing angles and ~99% sRGB color gamut.

The main difference, obviously, is the rapid 360Hz refresh rate and appropriately fast pixel response time to back it up. You can even overclock the monitor up to 390Hz!

Features

Additionally, the Acer XV252QF supports AMD FreeSync for tear-free gameplay up to 390FPS!

Acer’s Visual Response Boost backlight strobing technology is available as well, and it can operate at up to 390Hz. Other 360Hz gaming monitors with dedicated G-SYNC modules can only use backlight strobing at up to 240Hz.

Other gaming features include custom crosshairs, timers, Black Boost, and various pre-calibrated picture presets.

Design & Connectivity

Acer XV252QF Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is fairly sturdy and offers a good range of ergonomics, including up to 120mm height adjustment, -5°/25° tilt, +/- 180° swivel, 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports (max 240Hz), a headphone jack and dual 2W built-in speakers.

Alternatives

  • Acer Aopen 25XV2Q – the same monitor, just different branding. It’s Micro Center exclusive but can be found on sale for just ~$300.
  • Dell Alienware AW2523HF – affordable 25″ 1080p 360Hz IPS model without MBR

There are several 25″ 1080p 360Hz IPS models available with a dedicated G-SYNC module and ULMB (decent MBR implementation but only works up to 240Hz). These go for ~$400 – $700, so if you can’t find the Acer/Aopen models at a good price, they are decent alternatives when on sale:

The Pros:

  • Impeccable MBR implementation up to 360Hz
  • Plenty of gaming features, including VRR up to 360Hz
  • Fully ergonomic stand with a shading hood and hotkey puck

The Cons:

  • TN panel with inferior colors and viewing angles

About The Monitor

While the Acer XV252QF offers a buttery-smooth gaming experience, the BenQ XL2566K has next-level motion clarity thanks to its TN panel and DyAc+ MBR implementation. However, it’s significantly more expensive and has worse image quality, so we only recommend it for hardcore competitive players.

Image Quality

First of all, TN panels have narrow viewing angles, so the image will drastically shift in brightness, contrast and color when viewed at skewed angles. As long as you’re sitting directly in front of the screen, this won’t be an issue though.

Secondly, you get an overall worse color quality, so the image won’t be as vibrant.

The BenQ Zowie XL2566K makes up for those drawbacks by having a noticeably faster pixel response time speed for less ghosting behind fast-moving objects.

When paired with BenQ’s impeccable DyAc+ backlight strobing implementation, you get CRT-like motion clarity and while you cannot use MBR and VRR at the same time on this monitor, the brightness penalty is minimal.

Additionally, the monitor has plenty of additional gaming features, such as the shading hood, Black eQualizer, Color Vibrance, XL Setting To Share (easy import/export of settings among users). You also get the S. Switch hotkey puck for quick and easy OSD adjustments and swapping between presets or features.

Design & Connectivity

BenQ XL2566K Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is robust and versatile with up to 155mm height adjustment, -5°/23° tilt, +/- 45° swivel, 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports (limited to 240Hz), DisplayPort 1.4 and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

If the XL2566K is too expensive for you and/or you can’t maintain 360FPS, consider the 240Hz version, the BenQ Zowie XL2546K.

There’s also the newer BenQ Zowie XL2546X 240Hz variant with DyAc 2 with zero strobe crosstalk across the entire screen, but it goes for $100 more than the XL2546K (mainly prevents crosstalk on the middle of the screen).

Moreover, there’s a 24.5″ 1080p 500Hz G-SYNC IPS gaming monitor, the Dell AW2524H, but we don’t recommend it as it’s expensive and doesn’t have a very fast pixel response time speed.

The Pros:

  • ULMB 2
  • High pixel density
  • Wide color gamut
  • Plenty of gaming features, including VRR up to 360Hz and 25″ Mode
  • Fully ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The ASUS PG27AQN provides you with the smoothness of 360Hz as well as the detail clarity of 1440p resolution on a 27″ sized screen!

Image Quality

While most competitive gamers prefer 24″ sized screens as it allows them to be focused on the entire screen without having to move their eyes as they would on larger displays, there are a few advantages to using the ASUS PG27AQN.

To start with, its higher 1440p resolution has a higher pixel density, which means that the details will be noticeably sharper.

Further, it has a wide 98% DCI-P3 gamut coverage, resulting in exceptionally vibrant colors. The wider color gamut can sometimes make your enemies stand out more in certain environments.

On top of that, the ASUS ORG Swift PG27AQN combines the latest Ultrafast IPS panel by AUO with the Dual-Layer Voltage Driver technology for rapid pixel response time speed that rivals that of the BenQ XL2566K.

Variable refresh rate is supported up to 360FPS for tear-free gameplay, but there’s no Motion Blur Reduction, sadly.

Other features include ULMB 2, Dark Boost, crosshair overlays, on-screen timers and the 25″ Mode, which displays the image as a 25″ monitor with black bars around it.

Check out our full PG27AQN review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

ASUS ROG Swift PG27AQN Review

The stand is sturdy and offers height adjustment up to 100mm, -5°/20° tilt, +/- 25° swivel, 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, three HDMI 2.0 ports (limited to 144Hz), a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

If you are interested in these 27″ 1440p 360Hz IPS displays, you may want to wait for the updated model that will feature G-SYNC Pulsar (VRR + MBR performance), although we don’t know the exact release date or pricing yet.

The Pros:

  • Instantaneous response time speed
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 360Hz
  • High pixel density, wide color gamut
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Risk of burn-in (covered by a 3-year warranty)
  • No MBR
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

In case you want a gaming monitor that’s great for both HDR content consumption and competitive FPS gaming, the MSI MPG 271QRX is for you!

Image Quality

Thanks to its OLED panel, the MSI MPG 271QRX has an infinite contrast ratio as each pixel produces its own light or individually turns off for true blacks. On top of that, there’s no backlight bleeding, IPS/VA glow or haloing caused by local dimming, providing you with an immersive viewing experience, especially in dark rooms.

OLED displays cannot get as bright as some LED-backlit displays, so you’re limited to around 250-nits for SDR, but small HDR highlights get a boost up to ~1000-nits, which is enough for exceptional HDR image quality under normal lighting conditions.

Other drawbacks of OLED technology include the risk of burn-in (though it’s manageable with sensible use) and the uncommon subpixel layout that causes minor fringing on small text and fine details, but it’s not noticeable in games and videos.

The main advantage of OLED gaming displays is the instantaneous pixel response time speed, which results in exceptional motion clarity. When paired with the low input lag and a high 360Hz refresh rate of the MSI MPG 271QRX, you get a responsive and buttery-smooth fast-paced gaming experience.

It also supports VRR up to 360Hz and the usual gaming features, such as crosshair overlays, Night Vision, a refresh rate tracker and various picture presets.

Design & Connectivity

MSI MPG 271QRX Monitor Design

The stand offers height adjustment up to 110mm, -5°/15° tilt, +/- 30° swivel, +/- 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

The screen cooling and coating are the same as that of the MPG 321URX – it’s semi-glossy for a more vivid image, but it’s reflective and raises the black level when hit with direct lighting.

Connectivity options include DP 1.4, two 48 Gbps HDMI 2.1 ports, USB-C (DP Alt Mode and 90W Power Delivery), a headphone jack, built-in KVM and a dual-USB 2.0 hub (2 downstream + 1 upstream).

Alternatives

  • MSI MAG 271QPX – the same model but without KVM, USB-C and USB hub (also doesn’t support firmware updates) for $50 less
  • Dell AW2725DF – based on the same panel, no KVM/USB-C

In 2024, other manufacturers are also going to release their models based on the same 27″ 1440p 360Hz QD-OLED panel. In Q3 2024, we’re also expecting 27″ 1440p 480Hz W-OLED gaming displays.

Best Gaming Monitors For FPS Games

Want the absolute best monitor for FPS games? Look no further.

The Pros:

  • ULMB 2
  • Wide color gamut
  • Plenty of gaming features, including VRR up to 540Hz
  • Fully ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Narrow viewing angles

About The Monitor

If you want the absolute best eSports gaming monitor, there’s the ASUS PG248QP!

Image Quality

The ASUS PG248QP has a 540Hz refresh rate for incredibly low input lag and buttery-smooth motion clarity.

Most importantly, it uses a TN panel with a fast enough pixel response time speed to keep up with such high frame rates, meaning that there will be no ghosting behind fast-moving objects.

On top of that, it boasts NVIDIA’s ULMB2 backlight strobing technology that works all the way up to 540Hz with minimum brightness penalty (~300-nits) and virtually no strobe crosstalk or other visual artifacts!

The good news is that ULMB2 also works with AMD cards on this monitor. However, when using VRR, AMD cards are limited to 500Hz, whereas those with NVIDIA GPUs can use the full 48-540Hz range.

The main downside of the monitor are the narrow viewing angles, though this isn’t an issue as long as you’re sitting directly in front of the screen. The ASUS PG248QP even has a wide 90% DCI-P3 gamut coverage for more vibrant colors, while the contrast ratio is standard at ~1,000:1.

You also get the other standard features, such as crosshair overlays, Dark Boost, on-screen timers, etc.

Design & Connectivity

ASUS ROG Swift Pro PG248QP Design

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 110mm, -5°/20° tilt, +/- 30° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.0 ports, a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

While there are 1080p 500Hz IPS gaming monitors, such as the Dell AW2524H, its pixel response time speed doesn’t even come close to that of the PG248QP. More importantly, it doesn’t have a fast enough response time for its 500Hz refresh rate, which results in noticeable ghosting.

Therefore, the ASUS PG248QP is the best eSports gaming monitor available.

Alternatively, consider waiting for the Acer XV242F model. It uses the same panel, but without the G-SYNC module. At the moment, it’s only available in China for ~$540. We also don’t know how good its MBR implementation will be in comparison to ULMB2.

BenQ announced their ZOWIE XL2586X too, with a 24.5″ 1080p 540Hz TN panel and DyAc 2 backlight strobing implementation. It has less strobe crosstalk at the top and bottom of the screen, but it goes for $1,000.

The Pros:

  • Instantaneous response time speed
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 480Hz
  • High pixel density, wide color gamut
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Risk of burn-in (covered by a 2-year warranty)
  • No MBR
  • VRR brightness flickering in dark scenes of games with fluctuating frame rates (expected drawback of OLED and VA panels)

About The Monitor

As we’ve already mentioned, most competitive FPS players don’t use larger monitors than 27″, however, the LG 32GS95UE 32″ 4K 240Hz OLED display has a unique 1080p 480Hz mode, which might make some gamers want to reconsider.

Image Quality

The combination of 480Hz and the instantaneous pixel response time speed of OLED panels results in incredible motion clarity and low input lag.

The LG 32GS95UE has a button beneath its bottom bezel that can in a few seconds switch between the 4K 240Hz and 1080p 480Hz modes.

Now, because the monitor is not displaying its native resolution at 1920×1080, the image will be a bit blurry, but when you push the screen a bit further away, the blurriness is not really noticeable – at least when it comes to games and videos.

The monitor also has 24″ and 27″ modes that simulate respective screen sizes and puts black bars around the image, however, the image is even blurrier in these modes, so we recommend sticking with the native 32″ mode.

The LG 32GS95UE also supports VRR and offers standard gaming features, such as crosshair overlays, a refresh rate tracker and Black Stabilizer.

Check out our full LG 32GS95UE review for more details.

Design & Connectivity

LG 32GS95UE Design

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 120mm, 90° pivot, +/- 15° swivel, -10°/15° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility. The screen has a 4-side borderless design and a matte anti-glare coating that adds a bit of graininess to the image (mainly noticeable on solid colors), but efficiently prevents reflections.

Connectivity options include DP 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports with full 48 Gbps bandwidth, a headphone jack (with DTS Headphone:X) and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

The LG 32GS95UE also boasts the new Pixel Sound technology, which produces sound by vibrating film components applied to the OLED display instead of having speakers at the rear or the sides of the monitor for more realistic and clearer audio.

Alternatives

  • ASUS ROG Swift OLED PG32UCDP – upcoming model by ASUS based on the same panel with USB-C, KVM, BFI up to 120Hz and a heatsink for cooling instead of a fan

If you’re interested in a 480Hz OLED display, but don’t want to deal with the big 32″ screen and blurry image, consider waiting for the ASUS PG27AQDP with a 27″ 1440p 480Hz OLED panel and BFI support.

In case you just want a cheaper 32″ 4K 240Hz OLED gaming monitor, check out the MSI MPG 321URX for $950, though it doesn’t have the 1080p 480Hz mode.

Conclusion

Have you decided which gaming monitor to go with? If you have any additional questions or you’re having second thoughts, feel free to ask us in the comments below for further advice.

Even if you have a limited budget, the ViewSonic XG2431 will ensure that you’re on the same level as the pros; the rest is up to your skills and reflexes.

In case you want something even better, the Acer XV252QF is a step up – provided that you can maintain 390FPS, while the BenQ XL2566K and the ASUS PG248QP are mainly intended for professional players.

For mixed-use, we recommend the MSI MPG 271QRX and the LG 32GS95UE if you can afford it; otherwise, consider the HP Omen 27qs and the Acer XV271U M3.

Changelog +

  • May 28, 2024:
    – Replaced the Dell AW2725DF with the MSI MPG 271QRX.
    – Added the LG 32GS95UE.
  • February 10, 2024:
    – Removed the ASUS XG249CM and the Dell AW2521H (now moved to alternatives).
  • January 16, 2024:
    – Replaced the ASUS PG27AQDM with the Dell AW2725DF.
  • November 24, 2023:
    – Added the ASUS PG248QP.
    – Replaced the Dell S2522HG with the ASUS XG249CM, and the LG 24GN650 with the BenQ EX240.
  • November 6, 2023:
    – Added the Koorui GP01.
    – Replaced the Acer XV272UV with the XV271UM3 and the Odyssey G7 with the Innocn 27G1S.
    – Added a review summary for the HP Omen 27qs.
  • April 26, 2023:
    – Replaced the LG 27GR95QE with the ASUS PG27AQDM.
  • April 5, 2023:
    – Added a review summary for the LG 27GR95QE.
  • December 1, 2022:
    – Added review summaries for the BenQ XL2566K and the ASUS PG27AQN.
  • November 23, 2022:
    – Replaced the MSI G273QF with the Acer XV272UV.
  • October 14, 2022:
    – Checked up on the guide to ensure that our picks are still the best options available.
  • April 20, 2022:
    – Replaced the Acer XV252QF with the Acer Aopen 25XV2QF, the ASUS XG27AQM with the Gigabyte M27Q-X, and the MSI NXG253R with the Dell AW2521H.
  • February 22, 2022:
    – Added the MSI NXG253R.
  • November 23, 2021:
    – Replaced the Acer KG241QP, the AOC G2590FX and the BenQ EX2510 with the LG 24GN650.
    – Removed the Acer XF250Q and replaced the BenQ XL2546K and the ViewSonic XG270 with the ViewSonic XG2431.
    – Removed the HP Omen X 27.
  • September 9, 2021:
    – Replaced the Acer XV272UX with the ASUS XG27AQM.
    – Replaced the LG 27GL83A with the MSI G273QF.
  • August 4, 2021:
    – Removed the Acer XF252Q (no longer available).
    – Replaced the Dell AW2521H with the Acer XV252QF.
  • May 26, 2021:
    – Added the LG 27GP850 as an alternative to the LG 27GL83A.
  • May 7, 2021:
    – Replaced the ASUS PG259QN with the Dell AW2521H.
  • December 24, 2020:
    – Replaced the Dell AW2721D with the Acer XV272UX.
  • December 11, 2020:
    – Added the Dell AW2721D (and the Acer XV272UX as an alternative).
    – Replaced the BenQ XL2546S with the newer XL2546K model.
    – Added the Acer XB323UGP as a 32″ alternative for the LG 27GL83A 1440p 144Hz 1ms IPS monitor.

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Joseph Moore

Joseph has probably spent thousands of hours learning about displays in his free time and prior work experience at HP. He now writes and manages DisplayNinja to ensure it stays as the people's favorite resource.