OLED Monitors In 2024: The Current Market Status

Check out the current state of OLED monitors as well as everything you need to know about the OLED technology in this ultimate, updated guide.

OLED displays don’t rely on a backlight to produce an image, which allows them to generate true blacks for a basically infinite contrast ratio.

Moreover, they have an instantaneous pixel response time speed for minimal motion blur in fast-paced games.

There are already numerous OLED TVs available that take full advantage of the points mentioned above, but what about OLED monitors?

In this article, we’ll keep you posted about everything related to OLED monitors, including potential release dates or any market status updates.

You can also check out our dedicated New Monitors article to check on the upcoming Mini LED and other displays.

Updates +

  • March 4, 2024:
    – The LG 45GS95QE and 45GS95QB are now also available for pre-order. These are the updated models of the 45GR95QE with an increased 275 / 1300 nits peak brightness.
  • March 2, 2024:
    – The LG 34GS95QE and 39GS95QE are also up on Amazon for $1400 and $1500, respectively.
  • March 1, 2024:
    – The 32″ 4K 240Hz W-OLED (with 1080p 480Hz Dual Mode) monitors will be coming sooner than expected with the LG 32GS95UE already being listed for pre-order on Amazon and LG’s website for $1,400 with April 15 shipping date.
  • February 28, 2024:
    – Added more details about Gigabyte’s new widescreen OLED gaming monitors: All three models will feature KVM support, however, the FO32U2P model has USB-C with 65W PD, while the FO32U2 and FO27Q3 are limited to 18W. Still no word on official pricing and release date.
  • February 26, 2024:
    – The MSI MPG 271QRX is now available for pre-order on Newegg.
  • February 20, 2024:
    – Updated pricing info for the MSI 321URX and 271QRX models.
  • February 19, 2024:
    – The ASUS PG32UCDM 32″ 4K 240Hz OLED gaming monitor is now up on Newegg for $1,300.
  • February 9, 2024:
    – Added the ViewSonic XG272-2K-OLED.
    – Updated burn-in warranty information for MSI and ASUS models.
  • January 29, 2024:
    – The LG 27GS95QE is now available.
  • January 15, 2024:
    – The Dell AW2725DF is now available.
    – The Dell AW3225QF is now available.
    – Added the ASRock PGO34QRS2A and PGO270W2A models.
  • January 11, 2024:
    – Added three KTC OLED monitors:
    – G39S5 – 39″ 3440×1440 240Hz W-OLED
    – G34P5 – 34″ 3440×1440 240Hz W-OLED
    – G32P5 – 32″ 3840×2160 240Hz QD-OLED
  • January 10, 2024:
    – Added the MSI MEG 321URX with the SkySight AI feature.
    – Added the ASUS ZenScreen Fold OLED MQ17QH with a foldable 17.3″ 2560×1920 display.
    – Added the Gigabyte Aorus FO32U2P with a 32″ 4K 240Hz QD-OLED panel and DisplayPort 2.1 UHBR20, as well as the Gigabyte Aorus FO27Q3 with a 27″ 1440p 360Hz QD-OLED panel.
  • January 9, 2024:
    – Added the 27″ 1440p 360Hz curved QD-OLED panel.
    – Added the ASUS PG27AQDP 27″ 1440p 480Hz OLED monitor.
    – Added more information about the Dell Alienware AW3225QF and the Dell Alienware AW2725DF.
    – Added the ASUS PG39WCDM.
    – The following ASUS OLED monitors will feature ELMB / BFI: PG34WCDM, PG39WCDM, PG32UCDP, PG27AQDP.
  • January 8, 2024:
    – Added the Acer Predator X34X and the Acer Predator X39.
    – Added the ASRock PGO27QFS2A and the PGO34QRT2A.
  • January 6, 2024:
    – Added more information about the MSI MPG321URX – it will be available in February for $1,200.
    – Added more information about the Samsung OLED G60SD, G80SD and the new G95SD model – they will feature a light matte anti-glare screen coating.
  • January 5, 2024:
    – Added more information about the MSI MPG321URX and the MPG 271QRX.
  • January 3, 2024:
    – Added the Samsung Odyssey OLED G95SD, G80SD and G60SD models.
  • December 27, 2023:
    – Added new LG OLED panels, including 34″, 39″ and 45″ 5120×2160 240Hz ultrawide panels with increased 1300-nits peak brightness and improved RGWB subpixel layouts for less fringing on small text and fine details than that of the existing RWBG panels.
    – LG also revealed that they’re considering 27″ and 32″ 4K 240Hz OLED panels with true RGB subpixel layouts for late 2025.
    – Added more information about the LG 32GS95UE and LG 39GS95QE.
    – Added LG’s 27″ 1440p 240Hz 1300-nits glossy panel and the 27″ 1440p 480Hz panel with the new RGWB subpixel layout.
  • December 23, 2023:
    – Added the ASUS ROG Swift OLED PG32UCDP, based on LG’s 31.5″ 4K 240Hz W-OLED with 1080p 480Hz mode.
  • December 21, 2023:
    Added the following OLED monitors:
    LG 32GS95UE – 32″ 4K 240Hz (with 1080p 480Hz DFR)
    LG 34GS95QE, 39GS95QE – 34″ 3440×1440 240Hz
    LG 45GS95QE, 45GS96QB – 45″ 3440×1440 240Hz
    LG 27GS95QE – 27″ 1440p 240Hz
    HP Omen Transcend 32 – 32″ 4K 240Hz QD-OLED
  • December 13, 2023:
    – Added the Gigabyte Aorus CO49DQ and the AOC Porsche Design PD49 49″ 5120×1440 QD-OLED models, as well as the TCL / CSOT 31″ 4K 120Hz 3D panel.

CES 2024 New OLED Monitors

PanelMonitorScreenHDRUSB-C / KVMOther / Burn-in WarrantyRelease Date, Price
31.5” 4K 240Hz QD-OLED  Dell Alienware AW3225QF1700R, GlossyDolby Vision, 1000-nitsNoeARC,
3-year warranty
Available, $1200
ASUS ROG Swift PG32UCDMGlossyDolby Vision, 1000-nitsYes
(90W)
ELMB,
3-year warranty
Available,
$1300
HP Omen Transcend 32GlossyDolby Vision, 1000-nitsYes
(140W)
HyperX Audio,
3-year warranty
Q1 2024
Samsung OLED G80SDMatte1000-nitsNoTizen Smart OS –
Gigabyte Aorus FO32U2PGlossy1000-nitsYes
(65W)
DP 2.1 UHBR20H1 2024
Gigabyte Aorus FO32U2Glossy1000-nitsYes
(18W)
MSI MPG 321URXGlossy1000-nitsYes (90W)3-year warrantyAvailable,
$950
MSI MEG 321URXGlossy1000-nitsYes (90W)RGB / AI Features,
3-year warranty
MSI MAG 321UPXGlossy1000-nitsNo 3-year warranty,
*no firmware updates
Available,
$900
31.5” 4K 240Hz (1080p 480Hz) W-OLED, RGWBASUS PG32UCDPMatte1300-nitsYesELMB,
2-year warranty
August / September 2024
LG 32GS95UEMatte1300-nitsNoPixel SoundApril 2024,
$1400
27” 1440p 480Hz W-OLED, RGWBASUS ROG Swift PG27AQDPMatte1300-nitsYesELMB,
2-year warranty
August / September 2024
27” 1440p 360Hz QD-OLEDDell Alienware AW2725DFGlossy1000-nitsNo3-year warrantyAvailable,
$900
MSI MPG 271QRXGlossy1000-nitsYes (90W)3-year warrantyAvailable,
$800
MSI MAG 271QPXGlossy1000-nitsNo3-year warranty,
*no firmware updates
Available,
$750
Samsung OLED G60SDMatte1000-nitsNoQ1 2024
Gigabyte Aorus FO27Q3Glossy1000-nitsYes
(18W)
Q1 2024
ASRock PGO270W2AGlossy1000-nits?WiFi AntennaQ1 2024
34” 3440×1440 240Hz QD-OLEDASRock PGO34QRS2A1800R,
Glossy
1000-nits?WiFi AntennaQ2 2024
34” 3440×1440 240Hz W-OLEDLG 34GS95QE800R,
Matte
1300-nitsNo 2-year warrantyAvailable,
$1300
ASUS ROG Swift PG34WCDM800R,
Matte
1300-nitsYes (90W)ELMB,
2-year warranty
Available,
$1300
Acer Predator X34 X800R,
Matte
1300-nitsYes (90W)Q2 2024,
$1300
Gigabyte Aorus MO34WQC2800R,
Matte
1300-nitsNoQ1 2024
39” 3440×1440 240Hz W-OLEDAcer Predator X39800R,
Matte
1300-nitsYes (90W)Q2 2024,
$1500
LG 39GS95QE800R,
Matte
1300-nitsNo2-year warrantyAvailable,
$1500
ASUS ROG Swift PG39WCDM800R,
Matte
1300-nitsYes (90W)ELMB,
2-year warranty
Q1 2024

24″ – 32″ OLED Monitors

SpecificationsMonitor/PanelStatus
27" 1440p 240Hz 1300-nits GlossyQ1 2024
27" 1440p 360Hz QD-OLED CurvedN/A
32" 4K 240Hz RGB (LG)2025 (TBC)
27" 4K 240Hz RGB (LG)Q4 2025
27" 4K 240Hz QD-OLED2025
27" 1440p 480Hz 1300-nits RGWBASUS PG27AQDPAugust / September 2024
31.5" 4K 240Hz W-OLED RGWB
(with 1080p 480Hz support through DFR*)
LG 32GS95UEApril 2024, $1400
ASUS PG32UCDPQ3 2024
31.5" 4K 240Hz QD-OLED CurvedDell AW3225QFAvailable
31.5" 4K 240Hz QD-OLEDASUS PG32UCDMAvailable
Samsung OLED G80SDN/A
Gigabyte Aorus FO32U2PN/A
Gigabyte Aorus FO32U2N/A
HP Omen Transcend 32N/A
MSI MEG 321URXN/A
MSI MPG 321URXAvailable
MSI MAG 321UPXAvailable
KTC G32P5N/A
27" 1440p 360Hz QD-OLEDDell AW2725DFAvailable
Samsung OLED G60SDN/A
Gigabyte Aorus FO27Q3N/A
MSI MPG 271QRXAvailable
MSI MAG 271QPXAvailable
ASRock PGO270W2AN/A
27" 1440p 240Hz 1300-nitsLG 27GS95QEAvailable
27" 1440p 240Hz 1000-nitsLG 27GR95QEAvailable
ASUS ROG Swift PG27AQDMAvailable
Cooler Master GZ2711N/A
Corsair Xeneon 27QHD240 OLEDAvailable
AOC AG276QZDAvailable
Acer Predator X27UAvailable
KTC G27P6Available
ASRock PGO27QFS2AN/A
ViewSonic XG272-2K-OLEDN/A
32” 4K 60HzInnocn 32Q1UAvailable
LG UltraFine 32EP950Available
LG UltraFine 32BP95EAvailable
ASUS ProArt PA32DCAvailable
ASUS ProArt PA32DCMN/A
ViewSonic VP32-OLEDN/A
27” 4K 60HzPhilips 27E1N8900Available
LG UltraFine 27EP950Available
LG UltraFine 27BP95EAvailable
LG UltraFine 27EQ850Available
ViewSonic VX2722-4K-OLEDN/A
ASUS PA27DCEN/A
31” 4K 120Hz 3DTCL / CSOT 31" 4K 120Hz 3D PanelN/A
32” 4K 144HzAUO 32” 4K 144Hz PanelN/A
32” 8K 120HzAUO 32” 8K 120Hz PanelN/A
30” 4K 60HzDell UP3017QDiscontinued
*Dynamic Frequency and Resolution

UltraWide OLED Monitors

SpecificationsMonitor/PanelStatus
34" 5120x2160 240Hz W-OLED 1300-nits RGWBQ4 2025
39" 5120x2160 240Hz W-OLED 1300-nits RGWBQ4 2025
45" 5120x2160 165Hz W-OLED 1300-nits, RGWBDecember 2024
45" 5120x2160 240Hz W-OLED 1300-nits, RGWBDecember 2024
34" 3440x1440 240Hz QD-OLEDASRock PGO34QRS2AQ2 2024
39" 3440x1440 240Hz W-OLED 800RLG 39GS95QEAvailable
Acer Predator X39Q2 2024,
$1,500
ASUS PG39WCDMQ1 2024
KTC G39S5N/A
39" 3440x1440 165Hz W-OLED 800RN/AQ3 2024
34" 3440x1440 165Hz W-OLED 800RN/AQ3 2024
34" 3440x1440 240Hz W-OLED 800RASUS PG34WCDMAvailable
LG 34GS95QEAvailable
Gigabyte Aorus MO34WQC2Q1 2024
Gigabyte Aorus MO34WQCQ1 2024
Acer Predator X34 XQ2 2024,
$1300
KTC G34P5N/A
49" 5120x1440 240Hz QD-OLEDSamsung Odyssey OLED G9 G95SC
(Smart Features)
Available
Samsung Odyssey OLED G9 G93SCAvailable
Samsung Odyssey OLED G9 G95SDN/A
MSI Project 491CN/A
AOC Porsche Design PD49Available
Philips Evnia 49M2C8900
(USB-C 90W, KVM)
Available
Redmagic Realm 49" QD-OLED
(USB-C 90W)
N/A
49" 5120x1440 144Hz QD-OLEDASUS PG49WCD
(USB-C 90W, KVM)
Available
Gigabyte Aorus CO49DQ
(KVM)
Available
MSI MPG 491CQP
(USB-C 90W)
Available
45" 3440x1440 240Hz BendableCorsair Xeneon Flex 45WQHD240Available
45" 3440x1440 240Hz 800R 1000-nitsLG UltraGear 45GR95QEAvailable
Acer Predator X45Available
AOC AG456UCZDAvailable
45" 3440x1440 240Hz 800R 1300-nitsLG 45GS95QEAvailable
LG 45GS96QB
(USB-C 65W)
Available
34" 3440x1440 165Hz 1800RDell Alienware AW3423DWFAvailable
34" 3440x1440 175Hz 1800RDell Alienware AW3423DW
(G-SYNC)
Available
Redmagic Realm 34" QD-OLEDN/A
Samsung Odyssey OLED G8 (G85SB)Available
MSI MEG 342CAvailable
MSI MAG 341CQPAvailable
Philips 34M2C8600Available
49” 3840x1080 240HzBOE UltraWide OLED PanelN/A

42″ + OLED Monitors

<22″ Portable OLED Monitors

Click on the monitor in the tables above to jump to the section of the article that contains more information about it.

Best OLED Monitors – Buyer’s Guide

TypeMonitorPanelSizeResolutionRefresh Rate
Best 4K OLED Gaming MonitorsQD-OLED32”3840x2160240Hz
QD-OLED32”3840x2160240Hz
QD-OLED32”3840x2160240Hz
W-OLED42”3840x2160138Hz
Best 1440p OLED Gaming MonitorQD-OLED27”2560x1440360Hz
Best UltraWide OLED Gaming MonitorsQD-OLED34”3440x1440165Hz
W-OLED45”3440x1440240Hz
QD-OLED49”5120x1440240Hz
Best Professional OLED MonitorsJOLED27”3840x216060Hz
JOLED32”3840x216060Hz
-15.6”1920x108060Hz

If you’re looking for an OLED monitor for gaming, there are quite a few options to choose from nowadays!

Best 4K OLED Gaming Monitors

Want an OLED display with the 4K UHD resolution? Here are the best models currently available!

The Pros:

  • Exceptional color gamut
  • High pixel density
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 240Hz, BFI up to 120Hz
  • Dolby Vision (via future update)
  • Ergonomic design and rich connectivity options; KVM, USB-C 90W PD
  • 3-year burn-in warranty

The Cons:

  • Lower HDR brightness in some games when using an AMD GPU (there’s a CRU workaround)

About The Monitor

The ASUS ROG Swift PG32UCDM is the best all-around OLED gaming monitor you can get right now!

Image Quality

Based on Samsung’s QD-OLED panel, the PG32UCDM offers superior 99.3% DCI-P3 color gamut and higher color volume than that of LG’s W-OLED panels. This means that you get more saturated and brighter colors.

Brightness performance is also excellent with ~250-nits peak in SDR mode with Uniform Brightness enabled, which prevents brightness fluctuations based on the size of bright windows or APL (Average Picture Level).

In HDR, brightness gets a boost up to 500-nits for 10% white windows and up to 1,000-nits for small < 3% HDR highlights.

 100% White Window Max Brightness (SDR)100% White Window Max Brightness (HDR)10% White Window Max Brightness (HDR)1 - 3% White Window Max Brightness (HDR)
AW3423DW,
AW3423DWF,
Samsung G8,
MSI 342C
250-nits250-nits500-nits1000-nits
Dell AW2725DF250-nits250-nits500-nits1000-nits
Dell AW3225QF
ASUS PG32UCDM
MSI MPG 321URX
250-nits250-nits500-nits1000-nits
Samsung OLED G9
250-nits250-nits500-nits1000-nits
ASUS PG34WCDM270-nits270-nits750-nits1200-nits
ASUS PG27AQDM250-nits160-nits850-nits900-nits
LG 27GR95QE200-nits130-nits650-nits650-nits
LG 45GR95QE160-nits160-nits650-nits800-nits
Corsair Xeneon Flex190-nits160-nits650-nits800-nits
LG OLED42C3180-nits130-nits700-nits700-nits
ASUS PG42UQ200-nits120-nits800-nits800-nits
LG OLED48C3200-nits150-nits800-nits800-nits
Gigabyte FO48U110-nits110-nits500-nits600-nits
LG 48GQ900130-nits130-nits600-nits600-nits

Now, even though some LG’s W-OLED monitors have a higher white luminance, that doesn’t mean that they’re necessarily brighter.

While they can achieve a higher luminance when measuring white, QD-OLED panels have higher color luminance, resulting in an overall brighter image. The wider color gamut provides more saturated colors, which also increases the perceived brightness (Helmholtz-Kohlrausch effect).

In addition to the standard HDR10 format, the ASUS PG32UCDM also plans to add Dolby Vision support via a firmware update in H1 2024.

At the moment, there’s an issue with FreeSync Premium Pro. When using an AMD GPU, brightness will be lower in some games. An upcoming firmware update should be able to fix this, but in the meantime, you can just force the monitor to use FreeSync Premium in CRU (Custom Resolution Utility) to avoid this issue.

The monitor is factory calibrated at Delta < 2 for accurate colors out of the box in both sRGB and DCI-P3 color modes. You also get wide 178° viewing angles and true 10-bit color depth support for smooth gradients without banding.

The 4K UHD resolution looks incredibly sharp even on 31.5″ sized screens as you get a high pixel density of 140 PPI (pixels per inch). Moreover, the ASUS PG32UCDM uses Samsung’s third-generation QD-OLED panel with an improved subpixel layout, which in combination with the high pixel density makes for sharp details.

Traditional Vs Next gen QD OLED Subpixel Layout 1

There’s no noticeable fringing on small text and fine details as it’s the case with LG’s W-OLED panels and Samsung’s first-gen QD-OLED panels.

As is the case with all OLED panels, the PG32UCMD boasts an infinite contrast for true blacks as each pixel is self-lit and can individually turn off. This also eliminates various visual artifacts associated with LED-backlit panels, such as backlight bleeding, IPS or VA glow, blooming caused by local dimming, etc.

Another big advantage is the instantaneous pixel response time speed, resulting in zero ghosting behind fast-moving objects.

The main disadvantage (besides lower brightness in comparison to mini LED displays), is the risk of permanent image burn-in and temporary image retention when leaving an image with bright static elements on the screen for too long.

However, if you’re using the monitor sensibly (auto-hide taskbar and HUD in games where possible, use screen savers, don’t leave static images for too long, play varied content, etc.), it shouldn’t be an issue. You should also use ASUS’ burn-in prevention features, such as screen saver, adjust logo brightness, pixel cleaning and screen move. ASUS also offers a 3-year warranty that covers burn-in.

What’s interesting is that both LG and Samsung have claimed that their panels offer superior burn-in resistance, yet monitor manufacturers usually offer an equal burn-in warranty of maximum 3 years (Dell and MSI for QD-OLED, Corsair for W-OLED monitors).

ASUS is the first company to offer different monitors with both W-OLED and QD-OLED panels. However, while the PG32UCDM gets a 3-year warranty, their W-OLED models get only 2 years of burn-in warranty. So, it seems that at least ASUS is more convinced that QD-OLED panels have better burn-in resistance.

Performance

The ASUS PG32UCDM has a 240Hz refresh rate and supports VRR (variable refresh rate) for tear-free gameplay up to 240FPS with AMD FreeSync Premium Pro and NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatible certifications. HDMI 2.1 VRR is also supported, which is mostly important for the PS5.

Now, even though OLED displays have instantaneous pixel response time speed, there is still going to be some minor motion blur visible due to the sample-and-hold method of the display technology (including both LED and OLED).

This is why the PG32UCDM is equipped with BFI (Black Frame Insertion). This technology inserts black frames between regular frames, thus eliminating this perceived motion blur. However, it can only work at 120Hz and the brightness is reduced to ~100-nits while it’s active.

Besides the standard gaming features (Shadow Boost, crosshair overlays, on-screen timers, etc.), the PG32UCDM also offers 24.5″ (2992×1684) and 27″ (3288×1850) modes, which center the image and put black bars around the selected screen size for a better competitive FPS gaming experience. However, you cannot use VRR or ELMB in these modes.

Check out our full ASUS PG32UCDM review for more details.

Design & Connectivity

ASUS ROG Swift PG32UCDM Review

The stand of the monitor is robust and offers a good range of ergonomics, including up to 110mm height adjustment, +/- 15° swivel, -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility. It cannot be rotated though.

The monitor also has an integrated heatsink for passive cooling, which is preferred to having a fan for cooling as it can fail in time or be loud.

Next, the screen has a semi-glossy finish, so the image is more vivid as there’s no graininess associated with matte anti-glare coatings. However, this also means that the image is more reflective and it raises blacks when hit with direct lighting. As long as room lighting is behind the screen, this won’t be an issue.

Connectivity options are abundant and include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports with full 48 Gbps bandwidth, a USB-C port with DP 1.4 Alt Mode and up to 90W Power Delivery, a headphone jack, a SPDIF-out and a USB 3.0 hub (3 downstream + 1 upstream type B). There’s also an integrated KVM functionality and PiP/PbP support.

Note that you’re limited to a lower 180-nits peak brightness when using the full 90W of power delivery. You can still use 65W and get the full brightness performance though, you can choose between the two power delivery modes in the OSD menu.

The Pros:

  • Exceptional color gamut
  • High pixel density
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 240Hz
  • Ergonomic design and rich connectivity options; KVM, USB-C 90W PD
  • 3-year burn-in warranty

The Cons:

  • No Dolby Vision

About The Monitor

The MSI MPG 321URX is based on the same panel as the ASUS PG32UCDM, so you’re getting basically identical image quality and performance with fewer features.

Features

Just like ASUS’ model, the MPG321URX has a USB-C port with 90W PD and KVM, but it doesn’t support BFI, SPDIF-out and Dolby Vision. However, it is available for $950 in the US.

So, if you don’t need these features, you should definitely get the MSI model and save $350. It also has some advantages, such as a dedicated Adobe RGB color mode and since it doesn’t have FreeSync Premium Pro certification, you don’t need to use the CRU workaround if you have an AMD GPU.

Next, the MPG 321URX supports VRR up to 240Hz for tear-free gameplay and offers all the standard gaming features.

In some regions, the MPG 321URX goes for the same (or similar) price as the PG32UCDM, in which case we recommend getting the ASUS model or one of the other alternatives we’ll get into next.

Check out our full MSI MPG 321URX review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

MSI 321URX Review

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers a good range of ergonomics, including up to 110mm height adjustment, -5°/15° tilt, +/- 30° swivel, +/- 10° pivot for balancing and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Just like the ASUS PG32UCDM, the MSI MPG321URX has a heatsink for cooling and the same semi-glossy screen finish.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports with full 48 Gbps and CEC support, USB-C with DP Alt Mode and 90W Power Delivery, a dual-USB 2.0 hub (2 downstream + 1 upstream type B), a headphone jack and built-in KVM functionality with PiP/PbP.

Alternatives

MSI also plans to release two more versions of this monitor.

MSI MAG 321UPX – no USB-C, no KVM, no firmware updates for $900. However, we find that these features are definitely worth the extra $50.

MSI MEG 321URX – same as the MPG model but with extra AI / RGB features:

There’s an RGB LED strip beneath the bottom bezel that can show your in-game health, mana, etc. and the AI SkySight feature that can detect an enemy’s position and display it on screen (in supported games).

For instance, in League of Legends, it analyzes the mini-map and indicates where the enemy is going to appear. Check the video above for more information (around 09:55). No word on pricing and availability yet though.

The Pros:

  • Exceptional color gamut
  • High pixel density
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 240Hz
  • Dolby Vision
  • Ergonomic design
  • 3-year burn-in warranty

The Cons:

  • No USB-C / KVM

About The Monitor

Next, we have the Dell Alienware AW3225QF. It’s also based on Samsung’s 32″ 4K 240Hz QD-OLED panel, but it has a 1700R screen curvature.

It supports Dolby Vision, but lacks BFI, USB-C and KVM. It’s $100 cheaper than the ASUS PG32UCDM and $250 more expensive than the MSI MPG 321URX.

So, if you don’t need USB-C and KVM, and prefer curved screens, it’s definitely worth considering. Also, keep in mind that the prices vary across different regions.

The monitor supports VRR up to 240Hz for tear-free gameplay and offers all the standard gaming features.

Check out our full Dell AW3225QF review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Dell Alienware AW3225QF Monitor Design

The stand offers height adjustment up to 110mm, -5°/21° tilt, +/- 20° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Unlike the PG32UCDM and the MSI MPG 321URX, the AW3225QF has a cooling fan, but it’s silent.

Connectivity options include DP 1.4, two HDMI 2.1 ports (one with eARC support for Dolby Atmos), three downstream USB-A ports, a USB-C port with 15W Power Delivery and an upstream USB-B port.

Alternatives

Now – Gigabyte, Samsung and HP all plan to release their models based on the same 32″ 4K 240Hz QD-OLED panel. Here’s what we know about these monitors so far.

32″ 4K 240Hz QD-OLED Monitors
HP Omen Transcend 32
HP Omen Transcend 32 Monitor

Next, HP announced their model based on the same panel, the HP Omen Transcend 32 with DisplayPort 2.1 (only UHBR10, so DSC is still required), two HDMI 2.1 ports, a USB-C port with 140W Power Delivery, a USB hub (3 type A, 2 type B) and a built-in KVM. It also features Dolby Vision support. More info to come.

Gigabyte Aorus FO32U2P & FO32U2
Gigabyte Aorus FO32U2P

Gigabyte also announced a 32″ 4K 240Hz gaming monitor based on Samsung’s QD-OLED panel, the Gigabyte Aorus FO32U2P. It even features a DisplayPort 2.1 input with UHBR20 support, allowing for a full 4K 240Hz signal without using DSC.

Other specs include a KVM switch, USB-C (65W PD) and a tactical switch that scales the image to a 24″ screen for FPS gaming via one hotkey press.

The Gigabyte Aorus FO32U2 variant will be cheaper as it lacks DisplayPort 2.1 and its USB-C port has only 18W PD.

No word on pricing and availability yet.

Samsung Odyssey OLED G8 G80SD
Samsung Oddysey OLED G8 G80SD

As expected, Samsung announced a monitor based on the 31.5″ 4K 240Hz QD-OLED panel too, the Odyssey OLED G8 G80SD. It features Core Lighting+ RGB lighting, an ergonomic metal stand, two HDMI 2.1 ports, DP 1.4, a USB hub, FreeSync Premium Pro and DisplayHDR 400 True Black certification.

However, unlike the previous 32″ 4K 240Hz QD-OLED monitors, the G80SD will have a low-haze (25%) matte anti-glare coating for better reflection handling.

It might (not confirmed yet) also feature built-in Tizen OS with Multi Control and SmartThings features. No word on pricing and availability yet.

32″ 4K 240Hz W-OLED Monitors With 1080p 480Hz Dual Mode

You should also keep in mind that there are a few 32″ 4K 240Hz monitors based on LG’s 32″ 4K 240Hz W-OLED monitors coming in Q3 2024. These also feature a Dual Mode, which allows switching between 4K 240Hz and 1080p 480Hz.

LG 32GS95UE
LG 32GS95UE

LG announced the LG UltraGear 32GS95UE ahead of CES 2024. It’s a 31.5″ 4K 240Hz gaming monitor based on LG Display’s W-OLED panel with DFR support, which allows the monitor to switch between 4K 240Hz and 1080p 480Hz modes!

It also features a fully ergonomic stand, two HDMI 2.1 ports, DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC and a headphone jack with DTS HP:X support. Other specifications include FreeSync Premium Pro, NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatible and DisplayHDR 400 True Black.

The LG 32GS95UE also boasts the new Pixel Sound technology, which produces sound by vibrating film components applied to the OLED display instead of having speakers at the rear or the sides of the monitor for more realistic and clearer audio.

It will also have an improved brightness performance with a high 1300-nits peak brightness for small highlights and 275-nits peak for a 100% white window.

Next, it features a new W-OLED panel with an RGWB subpixel layout instead of the old RWBG layout, which should noticeably reduce fringing on small text and fine details.

The panel production date is set for May / June 2024, so we can expect the LG 32GS95UE to be available in late Q3 2024. However, the monitor is already listed for $1400 on Amazon (shipping April 15).

ASUS ROG Swift OLED PG32UCDP
ASUS ROG Swift OLED PG32UCDP

ASUS also revealed the ROG Swift OLED PG32UCDP based on the same panel with the 1080p 480Hz and 4K 240Hz dual mode.

Other specs include a 1300-nit peak brightness, a 2-year burn-in warranty, USB-C, KVM, HDMI 2.1, DisplayPort and ELMB / BFI support.

More info to come.

27″ & 32″ 4K 240Hz True RGB OLED Panels

LG is also considering developing 27″ and 32″ 4K 240Hz OLED panels with true RGB subpixel layouts in late 2025.

Other 27″ – 32″ 4K High Refresh Rate OLED Displays
TCL 31 inch 4K 120Hz OLED Monitor

AU Optronics plans to develop 32″ 4K 144Hz and 32″ 8K 120Hz OLED panels, but there’s no other information available than that.

TCL / CSOT also revealed a 31″ 4K 120Hz OLED panel using their IJP technology (Inkjet-printing). The panel will also support 3D (most likely similar to Acer’s SpatialLabs line-up with built-in eye-tracking cameras) and has a dome-shaped screen design. No word on pricing and availability.

The Pros:

  • Wide color gamut
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 138Hz
  • 2-year burn-in warranty

The Cons:

  • Too big for regular desktop use for most users
  • Expensive (especially in comparison to the LG OLED42C3)
  • Text clarity issues due to the uncommon subpixel layout

About The Monitor

If you want a smaller than 32″ 4K OLED gaming monitor, the 27″ 4K high refresh rate models aren’t expected before 2025. However, in case you want a larger model – there are a few options available in 42″ and 48″ screen sizes.

Image Quality

The ASUS ROG Swift PG42UQ is the best 42″ 4K 120Hz (138Hz via factory overclock) OLED gaming monitor available. Sadly, it’s too expensive.

It usually goes for $1,400, whereas the LG OLED42C3 TV can be found on sale for $800 with basically identical image quality and performance, and even more features, such as the built-in smart TV functionality and Dolby Vision.

Besides that, the main difference between the two is that the ASUS PG42UQ has a DisplayPort 1.4 input (though the LG C3 has HDMI 2.1 anyway) and a matte anti-glare coating, whereas the C3 has a glossy finish.

Now, a glossy screen surface makes the image more vivid as there’s no added graininess of matte coatings, but it’s also more reflective. In the end, it comes down to personal preference.

Therefore, we can only recommend the PG42UQ if you find it on a big sale and prefer matte anti-glare coatings.

Having said that, the PG42UQ does offer an enjoyable viewing and gaming experience. 4K UHD resolution looks sharp even on a 42″ sized screen! You get roughly 106 pixels per inch.

The monitor also has a decent peak brightness of ~800-nits for HDR content, while the brightness under SDR amounts goes up to 200-nits for a 100% white window.

10-bit color depth is supported without dithering and you get a wide 98% DCI-P3 color space coverage. An sRGB mode is also provided for an accurate representation of sRGB content.

Next, the monitor features variable refresh rate (VRR) with FreeSync Premium, G-SYNC Compatible and HDMI 2.1 Forum VRR support for tear-free gameplay up to 120FPS with a 40-120Hz range.

Check out our full PG42UQ review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

ASUS ROG Swift PG42UQ Review

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers +/- 5° tilt adjustment. You can also mount the screen via the 300x300mm VESA pattern.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 inputs, two HDMI 2.0 ports, a headphone jack, a digital audio line-out port and a quad-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

Philips offers a monitor based on the same panel, the Philips Evnia 42M2N8900 with USB-C 90W PD, a 25% haze matte anti-glare coating and a more ergonomic stand. It’s available for ~$1,100.

There’s also the KTC G42P5 version with USB-C 90W PD, KVM and a matte anti-glare coating (35% haze), but no Uniform Brightness mode, which will cause noticeable brightness fluctuations during everyday use (not an issue for gaming and watching videos).

48″ OLED Displays

Want a larger 48″ OLED display? Below you’ll find a list of all available models. However, in this case, we recommend considering LG’s TV as well, the OLED48C3, for instance, can be found for as low as $1,000 on sale.

LG OLED Flex LX3 – 42″ Bendable OLED Display
LG OLED Flex LX3 Monitor

The 42″ 4K 120Hz bendable OLED screen, the Flex LX3, can bend from flat to a steep 900R curvature with 20 levels in between.

Noteworthy features include Adaptive-Sync support (FreeSync Premium, G-SYNC Compatible), matte anti-glare screen coating, a built-in microphone, dual 40W integrated speakers, Dolby Atmos and RGB lighting that synchronizes with on-screen video/audio.

The screen can be bent manually or via the provided remote controller, while the stand offers height adjustment up to 140mm and -5°/10° tilt.

Panel-related specifications, such as peak brightness and color gamut aren’t revealed, but we assume they will be similar to that of the 42″ C2/C3 TV.

The LG 42LX3QPUA 42″ 4K 120Hz bendable OLED display is now available on LG’s website for ~$2,000.

Best 1440p OLED Gaming Monitors

Most gamers still find the 1440p resolution to be the sweet spot for gaming! Here are the best models you can get at the moment.

The Pros:

  • Exceptional color gamut
  • Decent pixel density
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 360Hz
  • Fully ergonomic design and rich connectivity options; KVM, USB-C 90W PD
  • 3-year burn-in warranty

The Cons:

  • No Dolby Vision

About The Monitor

A lot of gamers find 32″ sized displays to be too big for regular desktop use and 4K UHD resolution to be too taxing on the GPU. This is where the 27″ 1440p high refresh rate models kick in.

You still get excellent image quality thanks to the high pixel density, as well as a higher frame rate since 1440p is significantly less demanding than UHD – and the MSI MPG 271QRX offers exceptional value for the price.

Image Quality

The MSI MPG 271QRX is based on Samsung’s 27″ 1440p 360Hz QD-OLED panel, providing you with superior color vibrancy and excellent brightness performance.

Just like the 32″ models, the MSI MPG 271QRX has a wide 99.3% DCI-P3 color gamut, true 10-bit color depth support, wide 178° viewing angles, Delta E < 2 factory calibration and 250-nits peak brightness for 100% white windows, up to 500-nits for 10% and up to 1000-nits for < 3% windows.

The MSI MPG 271QRX also uses Samsung’s third-generation QD-OLED panel with an improved subpixel layout, however, since it has a lower (though still decent) pixel density of 110 PPI, some minor fringing might catch the eye of some users, but it’s definitely tolerable. It’s not as noticeable as it is on LG’s 1440p 240Hz W-OLED panels. In games and videos, it’s not noticeable at all.

Further, the monitor supports VRR up to 360Hz and offers all the standard gaming features.

Design & Connectivity

MSI MPG 271QRX Monitor Design

The stand offers height adjustment up to 110mm, -5°/15° tilt, +/- 30° swivel, +/- 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

The screen cooling and coating are the same as that of the MPG 321URX – it’s semi-glossy for a more vivid image, but it’s reflective and raises the black level when hit with direct lighting.

Connectivity options include DP 1.4, two 48 Gbps HDMI 2.1 ports, USB-C (DP Alt Mode and 90W Power Delivery), a headphone jack, built-in KVM and a dual-USB 2.0 hub (2 downstream + 1 upstream).

Alternatives

MSI MAG 271QPX

MSI also offers the MAG 271QPX version without USB-C, KVM and updatable firmware for $50 less. However, we find that these features are worth the extra $50.

There are several mode 1440p 360Hz QD-OLED models based on the same panel.

Dell Alienware AW2725DF
Dell Alienware AW2725DF Monitor

Dell’s model, the Alienware AW2725DF offers Dolby Vision support, but it lacks USB-C and KVM. Moreover, its HDMI 2.1 port is limited to HDMI 2.0 bandwidth, so it’s mainly intended for consoles (HDMI 2.1 VRR is supported).

Next, in the US, it’s $100 more expensive than the MPG 271QRX, which is why we recommend MSI’s model, though pricing will vary across different regions.

Check out our Dell AW2725DF review for more information.

Samsung Odyssey OLED G6 G60SD
Samsung OLED G60SD

Samsung’s variant, the Odyssey OLED G6 G60SD, will have a low-haze (25%) matte anti-glare coating for better reflection handling. No word on pricing and availability yet.

Gigabyte Aorus FO27Q3
Gigabyte Aorus OLED Gaming Monitors CES 2024

Gigabyte announced a gaming monitor based on the 27″ 1440p 360Hz QD-OLED panel as well, the Aorus FO27Q3. More details to come.

ASRock PGO270W2A

ASRock also revealed a model based on the 1440p 360Hz QD-OLED panel, the PGO270W2A. At the moment, known specs include FreeSync Premium Pro support, HDMI 2.1, DP 1.4, USB-C, a headphone jack, a WiFi antenna and an ergonomic stand.

27″ 1440p 360Hz OLED Curved Monitors

Samsung also has a 27″ 1440p 360Hz curved QD-OLED panel in the works, but no monitors that use this panel have yet been announced.

27″ 1440p 480Hz OLED Monitors

LG announced that their 27″ 1440p 480Hz W-OLED panel will enter production in May / June 2024, meaning that the monitors using that panel should be available in late Q3 2024.

We also know that these panels will have improved brightness (1300-nits peak for small HDR highlights and 275-nits for a 100% white window) and the new RGWB subpixel layout for less fringing on small text and fine details.

ASUS ROG Swift PG27AQDP
ASUS ROG Swift PG27AQDP

The ASUS PG27AQDP is the first 27″ 1440p 480Hz gaming monitor announced using LG’s W-OLED panel with improved brightness performance and RGWB subpixel layout.

Other known specifications include a 2-year burn-in warranty, USB-C, KVM, HDMI 2.1 and ELMB BFI (Black Frame Insertion) technology.

No word on pricing, while the expected release date is around August / September 2024.

27″ 1440p 240Hz W-OLED Monitors

There are several 27″ 1440p 240Hz gaming monitors based on LG’s W-OLED panel currently available. However, these displays usually cost the same (or more) than MSI’s superior MPG 271QRX 360Hz QD-OLED panel.

You might find some models, such as the Acer Predator X27U, on sale for as low as $600, in which case it’s worth considering if you want to save $200 and don’t mind the lower refresh rate, lower color volume and minor fringing on small text and details.

 LG 27GR95QE*ASUS PG27AQDMCorsair 27QHD240Acer X27UAOC AG276QZDCooler Master GZ2711KTC G27P6
Max. SDR Brightness (100% White Window, Uniform Brightness Enabled)200-nits250-nits160-nits200-nits260-nitsNot Tested200-nits
Max. HDR Brightness (100% White Window)140-nits160-nits140-nits230-nits140-nitsNot Tested200-nits
Max. HDR Brightness (10% White Window)650-nits850-nits650-nits650-nits650-nitsNot Tested750-nits
Max. HDR Brightness (≤3% White Window)  600-nits900-nits750-nits750-nits700-nitsNot Tested900-nits
USA Burn-in Warranty (can vary by region)2-year2-year3-yearNone3-year?None
Display Inputs1x DP 1.4
2x HDMI 2.1 (48 Gbps)
1x DP 1.4
2x HDMI 2.0
1x DP 1.4
2x HDMI 2.1 (24 Gbps)
1x DP 1.4
2x HDMI 2.0
2x DP 1.4
2x HDMI 2.0
1x DP 1.4
2x HDMI 2.1 (Gbps?)
1x DP 1.4
2x HDMI 2.0
USB-C (DP Alt Mode + Power Delivery)NoNo65W90WNo90W65W
USB Ports2x USB-A
1x USB-B
2x USB-A
1x USB-B
4x USB-A
1x USB-C
2x USB-A
1x USB-B
2x USB-A
1x USB-B
2x USB-A
1x USB-B
2x USB-A
1x USB-B
KVMNoNoYesYesNo?Yes
Audio Ports1x HP + Mic
1x Optical Digital
1x HP1x HP1x HP1x HP
2x5W Speakers
1x HP
2x3W Speakers
1x HP
2x3W Speakers
PS5 SupportFull
(4K HDR + 120Hz VRR)
1440p HDR + 120Hz VRR
or
4K HDR + 60Hz VRR
Full (with chroma)
4K HDR 4:2:0 + 120Hz VRR
1440p HDR + 120Hz VRR
or
4K HDR + 60Hz VRR
1440p HDR + 120Hz VRR
or
4K HDR + 60Hz VRR
Not Tested1440p HDR + 120Hz
or
4K HDR + 60Hz
Xbox Series X/S SupportFull
(4K HDR + 120Hz VRR)
4K HDR + 60Hz VRR
or
1440p SDR + 120Hz VRR
Full
(4K HDR + 120Hz VRR)
4K HDR + 60Hz VRR
or
1440p SDR + 120Hz VRR
4K HDR + 60Hz VRR
or
1440p SDR + 120Hz VRR
Not Tested4K HDR + 60Hz
or
1440p SDR + 120Hz
Other+ Hardware Calibration+ PiP/PbP– Requires manual swapping between SDR and HDR modes+ PiP/PbP
 Price / ReviewLG 27GR95QEASUS PG27AQDMCorsair 27QHD240Acer X27UAOC AG276QZDN/AKTC G27P6
*The newer LG 27GS95QE model is available with a higher 275-nit 100% White Window brightness specified. It has not been tested yet though.

There are a few more models that are yet to be released.

LG Display is also working on a 27″ 1440p 240Hz W-OLED panel with a higher 1300-nit peak brightness and a glossy screen surface. The panel should enter production in Q1 2024.

LG 27GS95QE
LG 27GS95QE

LG also announced the LG 27GS95QE variant ahead of CES 2024, which seems to just be a refresh of the 27GR95QE model at the moment.

Update: It’s now available on Amazon for $900. It features a higher 275-nit peak brightness for a 100% white window (LG 27GR95QE is limited to 200-nits).

The specified maximum brightness for small HDR highlights is the same at 1000-nits, though the LG 27GR95QE could only reach ~650-nits in tests.

ASRock PGO27QFS2A
ASRock PGO27QFS2A

ASRock announced their first OLED gaming monitors, including the ASRock PGO27QFS2A with a 27″ 1440p 240Hz W-OLED panel. Known specs include an ergonomic stand, HDR-400 True Black, FreeSync Premium, two DP 1.4 ports, HDMI 2.1, USB-C, a USB hub, a headphone jack and a WiFi antenna. More info to come.

ViewSonic XG272-2K-OLED
ViewSonic XG272 2K OLED

ViewSonic joins the party with a 27″ 1440p 240Hz OLED model, the XG272-2K-OLED.

Specifications include a 190-nit specified SDR peak brightness for a 100% white window, a fully ergonomic stand, two HDMI 2.1 ports, two DP 1.4 ports, USB-C with PD Alt Mode and 15W PD, a USB 3.0 hub, a headphone jack and dual 3W integrated speakers.

ViewSonic XG272 2K OLED Design

The ViewSonic XG272-2K-OLED features OSD controls integrated in the stand.

Best UltraWide OLED Gaming Monitors

Want an ultrawide OLED monitor? Here are the best models available!

The Pros:

  • Exceptional color gamut
  • Decent pixel density
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 165Hz
  • Ergonomic design
  • 3-year burn-in warranty

The Cons:

  • Minor fringing on small text and fine details

About The Monitor

The Dell Alienware AW3423DWF is still our top-recommended 34″ ultrawide gaming monitor!

Image Quality

Just like the other QD-OLED models in this guide, you’re getting the same key specifications, including a wide 99.3% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage, a 250-nit peak brightness for a 100% white window (500-nits for 10%, 1000-nits for < 3%), true 10-bit color depth, 178° wide viewing angles and DeltaE < 2 factory calibration.

While the 3440×1440 resolution is lower than 4K UHD, it actually provides a higher pixel density on 34″ sized displays at roughly 110 PPI (pixels per inch), in comparison to 92 PPI of 48″ 4K and 106 PPI of 42″ 4K displays.

So, you’ll get sharper details, as well as an extended horizontal field of view due to the ultrawide resolution.

The monitor uses Samsung’s first-gen QD-OLED panel, so some fringing will be noticeable on small text and fine details, but less so than on LG’s first-gen W-OLED panels.

You can learn more about the monitor in our full review.

Design & Connectivity

Dell AW3423DWF Review

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers a good range of ergonomics with up to 110mm height adjustment, -5°/21° tilt, +/- 20° swivel, +/- 4° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Next, the screen has a subtle 1800R curvature for added immersion and a semi-glossy finish that offers a more vivid image quality than the regular matte anti-glare coatings, but it’s not quite as good against reflections.

Connectivity options include two DisplayPort 1.4 inputs, HDMI 2.0 (limited to 100Hz), a headphone jack, a line-out port and a quad-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

There’s also the Dell AW3423DW variant with a dedicated G-SYNC model and a 175Hz refresh rate, but it’s $200 more expensive and lacks some features.

Samsung, MSI and Philips announced their models (without the G-SYNC module) based on the same panel:

 Dell AW3423DWFDell AW3423DWMSI MEG342CMSI 341CQPSamsung OLED G8Philips Evnia 34M2C8600
Max. Refresh Rate165Hz (120Hz 10-bit)175Hz (144Hz 10-bit)175Hz 10-bit175Hz 10-bit175Hz 10-bit175Hz 10-bit
Ports2x DP 1.4,
1x HDMI 2.0,
4x USB
1x DP 1.4,
2x HDMI 2.0,
4x USB
1x DP 1.4
2x HDMI 2.1
1x USB-C (65W PD)
4x USB
1x DP 1.4
2x HDMI 2.1
1x USB-C,
2x USB
1x Mini-DP 1.4,
1x micro HDMI 2.1
1x USB-C (65W PD)
1x USB-C
1x DP 1.4,
2x HDMI 2.0,
1x USB-C (90W PD),
4x USB
Cooling fans121NoneNone1
HDR
(AMD GPUs)
GoodGoodGoodNot TestedBad*Bad**
HDR
(NVIDIA GPUs)
GoodGoodGoodNot TestedGoodBad**
PiP/PbPYesNoYesYesNoYes
Ambient Light SensorNoYesYesNoYesYes
Updatable FirmwareYesYesYesYesYesYes
Other Notable FeaturesN/AG-SYNC moduleKVM switchKVM SwitchTizen OSKVM Switch
Ambiglow RGB
Price (MSRP)$1,100$1,300$1,100$900$1,500$800
Burn-in Warranty (in the US)3 years3 years3 years3 yearsN/AN/A
*Limited to ~450-nits unless VRR is disabled
**HDR Game Mode reaches ~1000-nits but over-brightens the image, while True Black Mode is limited to ~450-nits and some scenes are too dark

34″ 3440×1440 240Hz QD-OLED Monitors

In 2024, we’re also expecting monitors that will use Samsung’s third-generation 34″ 3440×1440 QD-OLED panels with a higher 240Hz refresh rate and improved subpixel layout for better text rendering.

ASRock PGO34QRS2A

At the moment, only ASRock announced their model, the ASRock PGO34QRS2A.

Specifications include a 300-nit SDR brightness, 99% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage and HDR-400 True Black. It has an ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options, including a WiFi antenna, HDMI 2.1, DP 1.4, USB-C and a headphone jack.

No word on pricing and availability yet.

34″ 3440×1440 240Hz W-OLED Monitors

ASUS ROG Swift OLED PG34WCDM
ASUS PG34WCDM

ASUS offers the PG34WCDM 34″ 3440×1440 240Hz monitor based on LG’s W-OLED panel with a steep 800R screen curvature and improved specified HDR brightness performance of 1300-nits peak for 3% window size, 650-nits for 10% and 275-nits for a 100% white window.

The PG34WCDM uses a W-OLED panel, so text fringing will still be an issue. Moreover, it uses a matte anti-glare coating that’s great at preventing reflections but adds graininess to the image.

It will also feature BFI support at 120Hz.

The monitor also features a heatsink, HDR-400 True Black certification and VRR support (FreeSync Premium Pro, G-SYNC Compatible, HDMI 2.1 VRR).

Connectivity options include DP 1.4, HDMI 2.1, USB-C and built-in KVM.

It’s available for $1,300.

ASUS also recently added a 2-year burn-in warranty for their W-OLED monitors, but the PG32UCDM model with a QD-OLED panel receives a longer 3-year warranty.

Note that while the PG34WCDM has a higher white luminance (1300-nits vs 1000-nits) than the Dell AW3423DWF, the QD-OLED panel actually offers a higher perceived brightness due to its wider color gamut and higher color luminance (brighter and more saturated colors).

On top of that, the AW3423DWF has a bit sharper text, an extra one year of warranty and can be found for up to $500 less, which is why we recommend it over ASUS’ model. Check out our full ASUS PG34WCDM review for more information.

LG 34GS95QE
LG 34GS95QE

Next up, LG announced their monitor based on the same panel, the LG 34GS95QE with two HDMI 2.1 ports, DP 1.4 with DSC and a headphone jack with DTS HP:X support. No word on pricing and availability yet.

It has FreeSync Premium Pro, G-SYNC Compatible and DisplayHDR 400 True Black certifications, but brightness capabilities are not specified.

It’s available for pre-order on Best Buy for $1,300.

Acer Predator X34 X
Acer Predator X34 X

The Acer Predator X34 X is Acer’s model with a 34″ 3440×1440 240Hz 800R W-OLED panel. Apart from the standard panel specs, it includes a USB-C port with 90W PD and an integrated KVM functionality. It will be available in Q2 2024 for $1,300.

Gigabyte Aorus MO34WQC2
Gigabyte AORUS MO34WQC2

Gigabyte also announced a model based on the 34″ 3440×1440 240Hz W-OLED panel, the Aorus MO34WQC2.

Known specs include FreeSync Premium Pro, two DP 1.4 inputs, two HDMI 2.1 ports, a headphone jack and KVM. It should be available in Q1 2024.

39″ 3440×1440 240Hz W-OLED Monitors

LG 39GS95QE
LG 39GS95QE

LG also teased the LG 39GS95QE monitor with a 39″ 3440×1440 240Hz W-OLED curved (800R) panel with 98.5% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage, 1300-nits peak brightness for small HDR highlights (275-nits for a 100% white window), an ergonomic stand, two HDMI 2.1 ports, DP 1.4 with DSC and a DTS HP:X port.

It also carries FreeSync Premium Pro, G-SYNC Compatible and DisplayHDR 400 True Black certifications.

It’s now available on Amazon for $1500.

Acer Predator X39
Acer Predator X39

Acer also announced a 39″ 3440×1440 240Hz W-OLED monitor for Q2 2024, priced at $1,500. Besides the standard panel specifications, the Predator X39 offers a USB-C port with 90W PD and integrated KVM functionality.

ASUS ROG Swift OLED PG39WCDM
ASUS ROG Swift OLED PG39WCDM

ASUS also announced a 39″ 3440×1440 240Hz ultrawide curved gaming monitor based on the same panel, the PG39WCDM.

Known specs include a 2-year burn-in warranty, KVM, USB-C with 90W PD, DP, HDMI 2.1, a USB hub and ASUS’ improved AI gaming feature set with Dynamic Shadow Boost, Dynamic Crosshair, Dynamic GameVisual and Variable Overdrive 2.0. It also features ELMB BFI support at 120Hz.

KTC G39S5
KTC OLED Monitors

KTC also announced three OLED monitors, including the 39″ 3440×1440 240Hz KTC G39S5 model, the 34″ G34P5 and the 32″ 4K 240Hz QD-OLED model, the G32P5.

34″ & 39″ 3440×1440 165Hz W-OLED Panels

LG Display is also planning 39″ and 34″ 3440×1440 W-OLED panels with a lower 165Hz refresh rate for cheaper gaming monitors in Q3 2024.

34″ & 39″ 5120×2160 240Hz W-OLED Panels

In Q4 2025, they are also planning to make 34″ and 39″ 5120×2160 240Hz panels with a 1300-nits peak brightness and the improved RGWB subpixel layout.

45″ 5120×2160 240Hz & 165Hz W-OLED Panels

Before that, LG Display will have 45″ 5120×2160 240Hz and 165Hz OLED panels enter production in December 2024. These panels will also have a 1300-nits peak brightness and the RGWB subpixel layout.

The Pros:

  • Wide color gamut
  • Low input lag, quick response time
  • Plenty of features including VRR up to 240Hz
  • Bendable screen, USB hub
  • 3-year warranty that covers burn-in

The Cons:

  • Low pixel density
  • Tilt-only stand, not VESA mount compatible
  • Risk of burn-in (covered by warranty)
  • Text clarity issues due to the uncommon subpixel layout

About The Monitor

The Corsair Xeneon Flex 45WQHD240 is a 45″ ultrawide bendable OLED display with a 3440×1440 resolution, variable refresh rate support (FreeSync Premium Pro, G-SYNC Compatible, HDMI 2.1 VRR) and a 240Hz refresh rate!

It’s based on LG’s W-OLED panel and can be bent between 800R to completely flat.

Other specifications include instantaneous pixel response time and infinite contrast ratio thanks to the OLED panel, as well as a high 1,000-nit peak brightness for HDR highlights and 160-nits for 100% SDR white window, and a wide 98.5% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage.

The 3440×1440 resolution on a 45″ screen size results in a pixel density of 83 PPI (similar to that of 27″ 1920×1080 displays), which won’t appeal to many users.

However, given the screen size and the distance you’d be away from the screen, it should be just fine for gaming and content consumption. In fact, at a distance of 41″ (104cm), the individual pixels won’t be noticeable.

It also offers a three-year warranty for burn-in and dead pixels.

Design & Connectivity

Corsair Xeneon Flex 45WQHD Monitor Design

The screen measures 41.36″ (~105cm) in width and 17.73″ (~45cm) in height, equivalent to a 36″ 16:9 screen with ~32% extra width. It has a matte anti-glare coating. Sadly, the stand is tilt-only and not VESA mount compatible.

You can get the desk clamp adapter separately though.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.1 ports, DisplayPort 1.4, two USB-C ports, (one with DP Alt Mode and 30W PD, and the other for the USB hub), four downstream USB-A ports and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

LG 45GR95QE
LG UltraGear 45GR95QE

The LG UltraGear 45GR95QE is based on the same panel as the Corsari Flex but with a fixed 800R curvature. Other panel-related specifications are the same except that LG’s model goes for $1700 and has an ergonomic stand, but its 2-year warranty doesn’t cover burn-in.

Check out our LG 45GR95QE review for more information.

LG 45GS95QE & LG 45GS96QB
LG 45GS96QB

LG also revealed the 45GS95QE and 45GS96QB models ahead of CES 2024.

Just like it’s the case with the LG 27GS95QE, these are the refreshes of the existing 45GR95QE model but with an increased 275-nits (for 100% APL) and 1300-nits (1% APL) peak brightness, while the 45GS96QB variant also includes a USB-C port with 65W Power Delivery.

Acer Predator X45
Acer Predator X45

Acer will also release a 45″ 3440×1440 240Hz OLED monitor, the Predator X45 based on the same panel with a fixed 800R curvature. It’s now available for $1700.

Unlike LG’s and Corsair’s models, the X45 has a USB-C with DP Alt Mode and 90W PD as well as built-in KVM functionality. However, keep in mind that Acer’s X27U 1440p 240Hz OLED model doesn’t have a Uniform Brightness feature, so it’s possible the X45 is missing it too. See our PG27AQDM review to see why that’s important.

AOC AG456UCZD
AOC AG456UCZD

AOC also announced a monitor based on LG’s 45″ 3440×1440 240Hz OLED panel with a fixed 800R curvature, the AOC AG456UCZD.

It offers a fully ergonomic stand with rich connectivity options, including two HDMI 2.0 ports, DP 1.4, USB-C with 90W PD, dual 8W built-in speakers, a quad-USB 3.0 hub, a headphone jack and integrated KVM functionality.

It’s now available for $1400.

The Pros:

  • Instantaneous response time, low input lag, VRR up to 240Hz
  • Infinite contrast ratio, wide color gamut, high peak brightness
  • Plenty of useful features
  • Built-in Tizen OS
  • Ergonomic design

The Cons:

  • Risk of burn-in (not covered by warranty)
  • Minor text clarity issues due to the uncommon subpixel layout (negligible for most users)

About The Monitor

The Samsung Odyssey OLED G9 is a 49″ 5120×1440 240Hz super-ultrawide curved (1800R) gaming monitor.

Thanks to its QD-OLED panel, you get a high peak brightness (1000-nits for small highlights, 250-nits for 100% white window) and exceptional color gamut coverage with 99% DCI-P3.

It uses Samsung’s second-gen QD-OLED panel with an improved subpixel layout. It still uses the triangular layout, but text fringing is a lot less noticeable and won’t be an issue for most users.

Samsung QD OLED 2023 Panel Subpixel Layout

There are two variants: the G95SC with built-in smart features (DeX, streaming apps, Air Play 2, voice assistance, Microsoft 365, WiFi, Bluetooth, etc.) and the G93SC without them, though both can be found at the same $1,300 price.

Check out our full Samsung OLED G9 review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung Odyssey OLED G9 Design

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 120mm, -2°/15° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

The screen has a moderate 1800R curvature for added immersion and a glossy screen surface for vivid image quality.

Connectivity options include DP 1.4 with DSC, HDMI 2.1, micro-HDMI 2.1, two 5W built-in speakers, a headphone jack, one upstream USB-C port and two downstream USB-C port. The G95SC model also has WiFi and Bluetooth.

Alternatives

There are plenty of other 49″ 5120×1440 QD-OLED panels announced, but they’re all more expensive than the OLED G9, including the lower 144Hz refresh rate models. The alternatives still might be worth considering if they offer useful features such as KVM or USB-C with 90W Power Delivery, and you find them on a big sale.

MSI Project 491C, MSI MPG 491CQP
MSI MPG491CQP
MSI MPG 491CQP

MSI announced the Project 491C monitor with a 49″ 5120×1440 240Hz QD-OLED panel back in January 2023 – it has not yet been released.

In November, MSI announced the MPG 491CQP model with a lower 144Hz refresh rate, so it’s unclear whether the 240Hz model has just been replaced with the 491CQP.

The 491CQP is now available. It also features a USB-C port with 90W PD.

Other specifications include a 3-year burn-in warranty, 99% DCI-P3 color gamut, 1800R screen curvature, MSI OLED Care 2.0, a custom heatsink, KVM, two HDMI 2.1 ports, DP 1.4, a dual-USB 2.0 hub and a headphone jack. Ergonomics include 100mm height adjustment, +/- 30° swivel, 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility and -5°/20° tilt.

AOC Porsche Design PD49
AOC PD49

AOC also announced a 49″ 5120×1440 240Hz QD-OLED model, the AOC Porsche Design PD49, with USB-C (90W PD, built-in KVM, RJ45 and a 5MP webcam.

It’s available for pre-order for $2,350, which is too expensive considering that the OLED G93SC went for just $1,000 during the Black Friday week, and regularly goes for ~$1,400.

Philips 49M2C8900
Philips 49M2C8900

Philips will also release a monitor based on the same panel, the Philips Evnia 49M2C8900 with built-in KVM and USB-C (90W PD). It’s not available in the UK for £1,650.

ASUS ROG Swift OLED PG49WCD
ASUS ROG Swift OLED PG49WCD 1

ASUS introduced their first monitor with a QD-OLED panel, the ROG Swift OLED PG49WCD.

It features a 0.03ms response time speed, a 2-year burn-in warranty, a 144Hz refresh rate, a 5120×1440 screen resolution, a 1,000-nit peak brightness, an 1800R screen curvature and an integrated heatsink for better burn-in resistance.

It also has a built-in KVM functionality and a USB-C port with 90W PD and DP Alt Mode (in addition to HDMI 2.1 and DP 1.4 ports).

It’s available for $1,300 – $1,500.

Gigabyte Aorus CO49DQ
Gigabyte Aorus CO49DQ

Gigabyte also announced a 49″ 5120×1440 144Hz QD-OLED model, the Aorus CO49DQ, with built-in KVM and USB-C (only 18W PD). It’s now available for $1300.

Samsung Odyssey OLED G9 G95SD
Samsung OLED G95SD

Samsung also announced a new G95SD model based on the same 49″ 5120×1440 240Hz QD-OLED panel as the G95SC. The main difference seems to be that the newer model features a darker stand with Core Lighting+ RGB and new Multi Control and SmartThings features.

Unlike the first-gen QD-OLED panels with semi-glossy screens, the new OLED G95SD will have a low-haze (25%) matte anti-glare coating for better reflection handling.

Best Professional OLED Monitors

Looking for an OLED monitor for professional color-critical work? Here, you will find the best models available (and announced).

The Pros:

  • Wide color gamut
  • Low input lag, quick response time
  • Factory-calibrated

The Cons:

  • Risk of burn-in

About The Monitor

The Philips 27E1N8900 is the most cost-effective 27″ 4K OLED monitor for color-critical work.

Image Quality

If you want a 27″ 4K OLED display, you’ll have to settle for a lower 60Hz refresh rate at the moment (and for the foreseeable future).

So, if you don’t mind the lower refresh rate and don’t intend on gaming, the Philips 27E1N8900 will suit you just fine with a high pixel density (166 PPI), resulting in sharp details.

Further, unlike Samsung’s and LG’s OLED panels, the Philips 27E1N8900 uses a JOLED panel with a regular RGB subpixel layout, so you won’t have any issues with fringing on small text and small details.

The Philips 27E1N8900 also has an exceptional color gamut with 99% Adobe RGB and 99% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage, true 10-bit color depth and Delta E < 1 factory calibration.

Additionally, it boasts rather decent brightness performance with a 250-nits peak for a 100% white window and up to 540-nits for small HDR highlights.

Design & Connectivity

Philips 27E1N8900 Design

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 130mm, 90° pivot, +/- 175° swivel, -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DP 1.4, USB-C (DP Alt Mode, 90W PD), a quad-USB 3.0 hub (1 upstream + 4 downstream), a headphone jack and integrated KVM functionality.

Alternatives

The following models use the same or a similar JOLED panel, but with additional features, such as hardware calibration support. However, they’re also significantly more expensive.

The Pros:

  • Wide color gamut
  • Low input lag, quick response time
  • Factory-calibrated

The Cons:

  • Risk of burn-in
  • No standard DP/HDMI ports

About The Monitor

If you’d rather have a 32″ 4K OLED monitor, we recommend the Innocn 32Q1U.

Image Quality

The Innocn 32Q1U also uses a JOLED panel with the regular RGB subpixel layout for crisp text and details. Moreover, it has a wide 99% DCI-P3 and 99% Adobe RGB color gamut coverage with Delta E < 1 factory calibration and true 10-bit color depth.

Brightness performance is the same as well, with a 250-nit peak brightness for a 100% white window and up to 540-nits for small HDR highlights.

Design & Connectivity

Innocn 32Q1U Design

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 120mm, +/- 30° swivel, -5°/15° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two USB-C ports with DP Alt Mode and 90W Power Delivery (45W if using both ports) and an additional USB-C port for audio (a USB-C to 3.5mm jack is provided).

Alternatives

There are a few more models based on the same or a similar JOLED panel. These monitors feature additional features, such as hardware calibration, but are also more expensive.

Best Portable OLED Monitors

If you need a good portable monitor, you’re in luck as there are some affordable models available!

The Pros:

  • High pixel density
  • Wide color gamut
  • Precise factory-calibration

The Cons:

  • None

About The Monitor

The Innocn 15A1F is the most cost-effective portable OLED monitor!

Image Quality

Even though it’s available at an affordable price, the Innocn 15A1F offers a wide 100% DCI-P3 and 99% Adobe RGB gamut coverage for vibrant colors.

However, it doesn’t have presets for each color gamut, resulting in over-saturated colors – however, you’ll be able to use software gamut clamps if you have an AMD or NVIDIA GPU. Otherwise, you should get the more expensive Innocn 15K1F model with dedicated color presets.

The 1920×1080 resolution on a 15.6″ screen provides you with a high pixel density of 141.21 PPI, which is comparable to that of 32″ 4K UHD displays, resulting in sharp details and text.

Additionally, it has a high 400-nit peak brightness. Check out our full Innocn 15A1F review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Innocn 15A1F Monitor Side

The monitor is extremely slim (0.2″) and lightweight (1.6 lbs). Connectivity options include two USB-C ports, mini HDMI and integrated speakers.

Alternatives

The following models use the same panel, but offer a bit different features and/or designs:

There are also a few 13.3″ 1080p models available:

15.6″ 4K UHD Portable OLED Monitors
ViewSonic VX1655 4K OLED

There are also several 15.6″ portable OLED monitors available with a 4K UHD resolution. However, on such a small display, the higher resolution is not that noticeable from a regular viewing distance yet the monitor is more expensive and the resolution is significantly more demanding.

However, if you find one on a big sale, have a higher-end system and want the sharpest text and details with 282.42 PPI, the following models can be worth considering:

ASUS and EIZO also had two 21.6″ 4K models available, but they were too expensive and have been discontinued:

ASUS ZenScreen Fold OLED MQ17QH
ASUS ZenScreen Fold OLED MQ17QH

ASUS announced a foldable portable OLED monitor, the ZenScreen Fold OLED MQ17QH with a 17.3″ 2560×1920 screen (185 PPI), equivalent to two 12.5″ 1920×1080 displays.

It also boasts 100% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage and DisplayHDR 500 True Black certification. Connectivity options include min-HDMI, two USB-C port and a headphone jack, while the monitor weighs only 1.17 kg (2.58 lbs).

More information to come.

Other OLED Monitors

If you’re not interested in any of the above-mentioned OLED displays, here you’ll find all the information about all other OLED monitors and announced panels. However, most of them are discontinued, overpriced, or have very little information available.

55″ 4K 120Hz OLED Gaming Monitors

55 inch 4K 120Hz OLED Monitors

You’ll be able to find 55″ 4K 120Hz OLED gaming monitors, including:

However, we don’t recommend these models as they’re terribly overpriced (~$3,000) and don’t even support HDR. You can get a 55″ OLED TV at half the price with better image quality and just as good performance.

32:9 UltraWide OLED Gaming Monitor

240Hz OLED UltraWide Gaming Monitor

BOE revealed a 32:9 ultrawide curved gaming monitor with an OLED panel. It boasts a 49″ 3840×1080 240Hz screen with a wide 95% DCI-P3 color gamut and a 500-nit peak brightness (150nits typical).

Sadly, we don’t have any other information about it, but we’ll update the article as soon as something comes up.

Burning Core

Burning Core OLED Monitor

Back in 2018, JOLED showcased a 21.6″ 1080p 144Hz OLED gaming display called the Burning Core, after the eSports team that helped develop the monitor.

At that time, they also mentioned that a 27″ 4K 60Hz OLED model is in the works, but there haven’t been any updates regarding either monitor since.

Dell UP3017Q

Dell UP3017Q OLED Monitor

Another monitor worth mentioning is the discontinued Dell UP3017Q with a 30″ 4K 60Hz OLED panel, which was the very first OLED monitor available.

It boasted a wide color gamut with 100% Adobe RGB, 97.5% DCI-P3 and 85.8% Rec2020 coverage. However, it was very expensive at ~$3,500, it didn’t support HDR, and had a low 300-nit peak brightness.

Conclusion

That’s all the information regarding OLED monitors we have so far.

If something new comes up, we’ll update the article first thing, so feel free to visit us again, and hopefully, you’ll find more OLED monitors!

You Might Love These Too

Cyber Monday Monitor Deals
Cyber Monday Monitor Deals 2023
Rob Shafer

Rob is a software engineer with a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver. He now works full-time managing DisplayNinja while coding his own projects on the side.