The Best 4K Monitors (2021 Reviews)

Check out the best 4K monitors for PC gaming, console gaming and professional use as well as everything you need to know before buying one!

Having trouble deciding which 4K UHD monitor is the perfect fit for you?

You’ve come to the right place!

Whether you’re looking for an economical but good 4K monitor for everyday use, the best display for PC/console gaming, or a professional screen for work, we’ll make sure you pick the best one for your preferences and budget.

These are the best 4K monitors currently available in 2021.

TypeMonitorSizePanelRefresh RateVRRHDR 
Best Budget 4K Monitors28”IPS60HzFreeSync90% DCI-P3
32”VA60HzFreeSync95% DCI-P3
32”VA60HzFreeSyncN/A
32”IPS60HzFreeSync95% DCI-P3
Best 4K Gaming Monitors27”IPS160HzFreeSync Premium Pro
(G-SYNC Compatible)
DisplayHDR 600
27”IPS144HzG-SYNC UltimateDisplayHDR 1000
43”VA60HzFreeSyncDisplayHDR 1000
Best 4K Professional Monitors27”IPS60HzNoneN/A
32”IPS60HzNoneHDR10
premium pick

LG 27GN950

lg 27gn950 monitor
  • FreeSync up to 160Hz
  • DisplayHDR 600
  • 1ms GtG response time
budget pick

ASUS VG289Q

asus vg289q monitor
  • AMD FreeSync
  • Wide color gamut
  • Fully ergonomic stand
best overall

LG 32UN650

LG 32UN650 Monitor
  • AMD FreeSync
  • Wide color gamut
  • Height-adjustable stand

Note that all monitors in this list support HDCP 2.2, so you will be able to watch copy-protected content in native 4K UHD resolution on streaming services such as Netflix, Amazon Video, etc.

Furthermore, all monitors feature modern flicker-free screens with integrated low blue light filters, which will prevent eye fatigue caused by prolonged use of the display.

Finally, rest assured that these monitors are reliable, thoroughly tested, and offer the best value for the money in their respective categories.

Additionally, feel free to leave us a comment below if you need help picking a new monitor.

You can also view our changelogs for this buying guide at the end of this article.

Best Budget 4K Monitors

Do you have a tighter budget, but really want a 4K display?

The following monitors offer excellent value for the price — just without bells and whistles that some more expensive models have.

The Pros:

  • Wide color gamut and wide viewing angles
  • Plenty of features including FreeSync
  • Fully ergonomic stand

The Cons:

  • Entry-level HDR only, which is acceptable considering the price

About The Monitor

Looking for the most affordable 4K monitor that’s actually worth the price?

The ASUS VG289Q is the best 4K monitor for gaming, work, or any other use at this price range.

Image Quality

Based on an IPS panel with dithered 10-bit color support, the ASUS VG289Q delivers an amazing picture quality with vibrant and precise colors. In fact, it offers better image quality than some more expensive 4K models.

Now, panel-related specs include the standard 1,000:1 contrast ratio, 178-degree wide viewing angles, a 350-nit peak brightness and a fast 5ms response time speed for minimal ghosting of fast-moving objects.

The monitor also offers a wide 90% DCI-P3 color gamut (~120% sRGB).

There’s an sRGB emulation mode that’s supposed to clamp the gamut to ~100% sRGB for more precise color reproduction of the sRGB color space, but it’s not quite effective, though this can vary across different units.

So, if you plan on doing color-critical work within the sRGB color space, you’ll need a colorimeter to profile the display. In case you have an AMD graphics card, you can clamp the gamut in your drivers settings.

The monitor also supports HDR (High Dynamic Range), but it entry-level only meaning that that it doesn’t have high enough brightness and contrast or local dimming required for the ‘true’ HDR viewing experience.

Instead, it can just accept and display HDR10 content with a bit better colors thanks to its wide gamut, which is expected from an HDR monitor at this price range.

Lastly, 4K Ultra HD resolution on 28″ screens provides you with roughly 157 pixels per inch, which results in stunning detail clarity and plenty of available screen real estate.

So, you’ll need to scale your interface for small items such as text to be readable.

4k scaling

Features

Moving on, the ASUS VG289Q 28″ 4K monitor also offers lots of useful gaming features including Shadow Boost for better visibility in dark games, customizable crosshairs, on-screen timers and refresh rate trackers, and picture presets.

Further, the monitor supports AMD FreeSync which eliminates all screen tearing and stuttering between 40-60Hz/FPS (Frames Per Second) if you have a FreeSync-compatible graphics card.

FreeSync is supported over both HDMI and DisplayPort, so you can use it with Xbox One consoles.

The ASUS VG289Q is G-SYNC compatible even though it’s not certified as such by NVIDIA, so your mileage might vary; some units might have minor flickering issues, though none have been reported so far.

Design & Connectivity

asus vg289q monitor back

The ASUS VG289Q has ultra-thin bezels and a fully ergonomic stand with up to 150mm height adjustment, -5°/20° tilt, +/- 62° swivel, 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity includes two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.2, a headphone jack and two 2W built-in speakers.

Alternatives

Overall, the ASUS VG289Q is the best 4K monitor for everyday use around $300.

Should you not be able to find it, check out the Acer CB282K or the Samsung U28R550, which use the same panel and offer basically identical image quality and performance, just different design and features.

If you’re interested in something a tad more cost-effective, consider the Philips 278E1A, though it doesn’t support FreeSync, DCI-P3 color gamut, or HDR.

In case you want something with the standard sRGB color gamut for entry-level color-critical work, check out the Dell S2721QS.

Have a USB-C laptop with DP Alt Mode and Power Delivery? You’ll love the Philips 272P7VUBNB; it is the best budget 4K monitor with a USB-C port that supports power delivery (up to 65W).

The Pros:

  • Built-in speakers
  • Wide color gamut and high contrast ratio
  • AMD FreeSync

The Cons:

  • Minor ghosting in fast-paced games, mainly in darker scenes
  • Tilt-only stand
  • Narrow viewing angles

About The Monitor

Do you want an affordable 32″ monitor with 4K UHD resolution?

You’ll have to settle with one with a VA panel as the IPS models are much more expensive.

This isn’t necessarily a bad thing as VA panels have their advantages too.

Image Quality

This monitor’s VA panel offers a superb contrast ratio of 3,000:1. In comparison to IPS and TN panel monitors, you get deeper black shades and an overall better relation between the darkest and the brightest tones.

Now, the colors aren’t as consistent as that of the previously-mentioned IPS models, but they are good nonetheless and, in fact, much better than what you might find on any TN display.

As if that’s not enough, the LG 32UL500 even has a wide 95% DCI-P3 color gamut, and it supports HDR, which will make the colors of compatible content more punchy and lifelike.

It has a peak luminance of 300-nits, which is plenty for an enjoyable viewing experience under normal lighting conditions. Still, it’s not enough for VESA’s DisplayHDR 400 certification, which requires a peak brightness of at least 400-nits.

Regardless, thanks to the wide color gamut and high native contrast ratio, HDR content will look better than SDR. Note that this still provides just a glimpse of what HDR can actually do.

Here’s why: for a notable improvement in HDR picture quality, a display should have at least DisplayHDR 600 certification or ideally, DisplayHDR 1000, and full-array local dimming, which we’ll get into later on with the more expensive 4K monitors.

VA panels also don’t have as wide viewing angles as the IPS models, so the picture will degrade a bit when looked at an angle.

Features

The LG 32UL500 supports AMD FreeSync over both HDMI and DisplayPort, but when using NVIDIA cards, FreeSync only works within the 48-60Hz range.

Other features include LG’s standard inclusions such as On-Screen Control, Screen Split, Black Stabilizer, Dynamic Action Sync, etc.

Generally, VA panels also have a slower pixel response time speed, but since this is just a 60Hz display, there is only minor smearing visible behind fast-moving objects.

Design & Connectivity

lg 32ul500 monitor back

The LG 32UL500 has a tilt-only stand (-5°/15°), but it’s VESA mount compatible (100x100mm).

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.2, a headphone jack and dual 5W built-in speakers.

Alternatives

There are numerous different versions of the LG 32UL500 available. They all use the same panel, so the image quality and performance will be basically the same, apart from panel variance, so we recommend going for whichever is cheaper/available in your region:

  • LG 32UK550 – 2018 version with a height-adjustable stand
  • LG 32UN550 – 2020 version with a height-adjustable stand
  • LG 32UN500 – 2020 version of the LG 32UL500 (2019)

The BenQ EW3270U and the ASUS VA32UQ use the same panel as LG’s models, but they don’t have integrated speakers nor height-adjustable stands, yet they are more expensive.

The Pros:

  • Built-in speakers
  • Wide color gamut and high contrast ratio
  • AMD FreeSync

The Cons:

  • Minor ghosting in fast-paced games, mainly in darker scenes
  • Tilt-only stand
  • Narrow FreeSync range

About The Monitor

Interested in something a bit different?

Check out the Philips 328E1CA with a 1500R screen curvature!

Image Quality

Monitors with curved screens make most sense with 21:9 ultrawide displays, but some users prefer the curvature even on regular 16:9 widescreen monitors.

Usually, curved widescreen monitors ranging from 24″ to 27″ have curvatures of 1500R or 1800R, which is not that noticeable or effective, but the 1500R curve is quite eye-catching on the 32″ sized screen of the Philips 328E1CA.

The curvature provides a bit of extra depth to the picture and increases immersion, but not everyone will be a fan of it. Some will love it straight away, others will despite it, and some will just need a bit of time getting used to it.

Now, the VA panel of the Philips 328E1CA also provides better viewing angles than the previously mentioned flat-screen alternatives, so you won’t get as noticeable gamma/saturation shifts at different angles.

It has a somewhat weaker peak brightness of 250-nits and a static contrast ratio of 2,500:1, while its 120% sRGB color gamut provides some extra color vibrancy. Sadly, there’s no sRGB emulation mode here either.

Features

The Philips 328E1CA monitor has a rather narrow FreeSync range of 48-60Hz, but it’s supported over both HDMI and DisplayPort.

All in all, the image quality and performance between the 328E1CA and LG’s flat-screen models is very similar, the main difference is that Philips’ monitor has wider viewing angles and a curved screen — so, it’s all up to your preference.

Design & Connectivity

Philips 328E1CA Monitor Back

The stand of the monitor is tilt-only by -5°/20°, but the screen is VESA mount compatible via the 100x100mm VESA pattern.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.2, two HDMI 2.0 ports, a headphone jack and dual 3W built-in speakers.

Alternatives

There are two more models that use the same panel, but they’re usually more expensive yet the difference in image quality, performance and features is minimal, certainly not worth the extra ~$100.

The Pros:

  • Built-in speakers
  • Wide color gamut and viewing angles
  • AMD FreeSync
  • Height-adjustable stand

The Cons:

  • Design lacks swivel/pivot
  • Not as deep blacks as that of VA panels

About The Monitor

32″ 4K IPS monitors are much more expensive (~$700+) than the VA models as they’re mainly intended for professional use, but the LG 32UN650 is available for around $450!

Obviously, it doesn’t have the premium feature of $700+ models, such as professional-grade factory-calibration, but thanks to its IPS panel, you still get consistent colors and wide viewing angles, as well as fast response time speed.

Image Quality

Here’s the deal: the LG 32UN650 has a static contrast ratio of 1,000:1, so you won’t get as deep blacks as in the previously mentioned VA models.

However, you get wide color gamut support (95% DCI-P3) and, if you have more people in the room looking at the screen, the picture won’t degrade at an angle. Additionally, it has a fast pixel response time speed, which makes the monitor great for fast-paced games.

Sadly, there’s no sRGB emulation mode, but if you have a colorimeter, you can use the monitor for color-critical work as well.

Features

The monitor supports AMD FreeSync with a 40-60Hz range over both DisplayPort and HDMI, and you’ll find all of LG’s standard features in the OSD menu, including Black Stabilizer, various picture presets and advanced image adjustment tools.

Visit our LG 32UN650 review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

LG 32UN650 Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is height-adjustable by 110mm, and you can tilt the screen by -5°/20° or mount it using the 100x100mm VESA pattern.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 inputs, a headphone jack and dual 5W built-in speakers.

Best 4K Gaming Monitors

Looking for the best 4K gaming monitor?

Well, you have come to the right place as here you can find the best models currently available as well as everything you need to know about them.

The Pros:

  • DisplayHDR 600
  • Vibrant and consistent colors
  • Quick response time speed
  • FreeSync up to 160Hz
  • Ergonomic design, USB ports

The Cons:

  • Design lacks swivel function
  • Not as deep blacks as that of VA panels

About The Monitor

Want both 4K UHD resolution and a 144Hz refresh rate, and you have a budget of around $800?

Look no further than the LG 27GN950.

Image Quality

The LG 27GN950 is based on an IPS panel with 10-bit color depth, wide 98% DCI-P3 color gamut, 178-degree viewing angles, a 1,000:1 static contrast ratio and a 400-nit peak brightness (600-nit for HDR content).

What does this mean for you?

You get a vibrant picture quality with gorgeous bright colors and crisp details.

Now, contrast ratio is not as high as it is on VA panels, but it’s decent for an IPS display; blacks aren’t very deep, but the striking colors make up for it.

Even though you’re not getting the true HDR viewing experience of the more expensive models, you do get a significant improvement in HDR image quality in comparison to the entry-level HDR400 displays.

There are even 16 dimming zones that can dim parts of the screen with dark content without affecting the bright areas, thus effectively increasing the contrast ratio a bit.

Features

Moving on, the display supports FreeSync Premium Pro and NVIDIA’s G-SYNC Compatible mode with a wide 48-160Hz variable refresh rate range.

In addition to the monitor’s low input lag and rapid 1ms GtG pixel response time, you’ll be able to enjoy smooth gaming performance with no tearing, delay, or ghosting!

Other interesting features include custom crosshairs, Black Stabilizer (better visibility in darker games), various picture presets and RGB lighting at the back of the monitor with 48 LEDs that you can even sync with audio/video.

Design & Connectivity

lg ultragear 27gn950 monitor

The LG 27GN950 boasts premium design quality with thin bezels at all four sides and versatile ergonomics, including up to 110mm height adjustment, 90° pivot, -5°/15° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.0b ports (support 4K up to 60Hz with HDR), a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

You’ll need a graphics card that supports DisplayPort 1.4 DSC to get 144Hz at 4K with 10-bit color without any visual compression.

With older cards, you’re limited to 95Hz 10-bit or 120Hz 8-bit at 4K.

Alternatives

  • LG 27GP950 – the upcoming updated model of this monitor with the same specifications plus HDMI 2.1 support

The Pros:

  • Exceptional HDR image quality
  • Vibrant and accurate colors
  • Quick response time speed
  • NVIDIA G-SYNC up to 144Hz
  • Fully ergonomic design

The Cons:

  • Expensive
  • DP 1.4 bandwidth limitations
  • Halo/bloom effect in certain scenarios

About The Monitor

Want the absolute best gaming monitor there is, and money isn’t an issue?

The ASUS ROG Swift PG27UQ is for you.

Image Quality

The previously mentioned 4K displays don’t even come close to what the ASUS PG27UQ can do.

So, with a stellar peak brightness of 1,000-nits, a contrast ratio of up to 50,000:1 and 97% DCI-P3 color gamut, the monitor delivers an absolutely stunning HDR image quality!

Now, the main reason behind such display capability lies in its full-array local dimming, which consists of 384 zones that individually dim parts of the image that need to be darker without affecting parts of the picture that are supposed to be bright.

Note that in certain scenarios, whether it’s a video game or a desktop application, where a bright object is surrounded by dimmed zones, some light that’s illuminating the said object will bleed into those dimmed zones thus creating a halo/bloom effect.

For instance, when moving a white cursor across a black background. In these cases, it’s preferred to disable the local dimming option in the OSD menu of the monitor.

Here’s the kicker: the monitor is factory-calibrated with Delta E ≤ 3 accuracy and covers 99% of the Adobe RGB color space, which makes it suitable for professional color-critical work as well.

The ASUS PG27UQ supports 4K up to 120Hz natively, but you can overclock it.

DisplayPort 1.4 limits you to 98Hz with 10-bit color, 120Hz with 8-bit color and 144Hz with chroma subsampling.

You can find more information about the monitor in our thorough ASUS ROG Swift PG27UQ review.

Features

The monitor includes a bunch of extra useful features as well, including Aura Sync RGB and logo projection lighting technologies. It also has a built-in sensor that adjusts the monitor’s luminance according to ambient lighting.

The ASUS PG27UQ boasts NVIDIA’s G-SYNC Ultimate badge, which guarantees smooth performance and exceptional HDR picture quality with low input lag in addition to providing a 30-144Hz VRR range and variable overdrive.

Finally, the GamePlus and GameVisual features offer pre-optimized gaming presets for Racing, RPG, RTS and FPS genres, as well as customizable crosshairs and on-screen timers.

Design & Connectivity

best 27 inch 4k monitor

The gamer-inspired design consists of extensive ergonomics including 90° rotation, up to 120mm of height adjustment, -/+ 35° swivel to the left and right, -5°/20° tilt and VESA mount compatibility.

Turning to the connectivity, you will find an HDMI 2.0 port, a DisplayPort 1.4 input, a headphone jack and two downstream USB 3.0 ports.

Alternatives

The ASUS PG27UQ is by far the best 4K gaming monitor you can buy at the moment, though its price is not as appealing.

Acer offers its version of this monitor dubbed as the Acer Predator X27.

The Acer X27 has two additional USB ports and integrated speakers, but its design lacks pivot function, and it has less customizable RGB lighting.

We recommend going for whichever is available/cheaper or according to your preference for the design.

Moreover, in 2021, ASUS will release an updated version of this monitor with a 576-zone mini-LED FALD backlight, the ASUS PG27UQX, as well as a 32″ version, the ASUS PG32UQX with 1152-zone mini-LED FALD and DisplayHDR 1400. So, if you intended on spending over $2,000 on a 4K gaming monitor, you should wait for these updated models.

The Pros:

  • Large 43″ 4K display
  • Decent HDR image quality
  • High contrast ratio for deep blacks
  • FreeSync up to 60Hz

The Cons:

  • BGR pixel layout
  • Minor ghosting in fast-paced games, mostly in darker scenes

About The Monitor

Interested in a bigger 4K monitor?

Unfortunately, there aren’t any 32″ 4K 120Hz+ models currently available, so if you want a bigger screen, you’ll have to settle for a 43″ monitor such as the Philips 436M6VBPAB.

Image Quality

Now, the Philips 436M6VBPAB is based on a 42.5″ VA panel with 4K UHD resolution, 60Hz, 97% DCI-P3 color gamut, 10-bit color depth, a static contrast ratio of 4,000:1 and a peak brightness of 720-nits (1,000-nits for HDR content).

Additionally, it also supports HDR and carries VESA’s DisplayHDR 1000 certification. However, unlike the ASUS PG27UQ, the Philips 436M6 is edge-lit, and it only has 32 dimming zones.

So, HDR content will look good as local dimming can increase the contrast ratio up to ~7,000:1, but the PG27UQ offers a far superior HDR viewing experience.

Another important thing to note here is that the monitor uses a BGR subpixel layout instead of regular RGB.

This causes text to be somewhat blurry and unclear. In video games, it’s not noticeable, but if you intend to use the monitor for work too, you will need to use scaling to make the text clearer.

Just like with all VA panels, the response time speed is a bit slower, so some smearing will be visible in fast-paced games, mainly when dark pixels are predominant in the picture.

Overall, the monitor offers an immersive image quality, but for most people, it will be simply too big for regular desktop use.

Features

The Philips 436M6VBPAB supports AMD FreeSync with a 48-60Hz VRR range.

Other features include PiP/PbP, various pre-calibrated picture presets and the Ambiglow RGB technology with LEDs placed beneath the bottom bezel of the monitor which can be synchronized with on-screen content.

Design & Connectivity

philips 436m6vbpab hdr pc monitor

The Philips 436M6VBPAB is VESA mount compatible via the 200x200mm pattern, but you can only tilt its screen by -5°/10°. Note that the screen has a glossy finish which is highly reflective, but it makes the picture more vibrant.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.2, mini-DisplayPort 1.2, HDMI 2.0, USB-C (with DP 1.2 Alt Mode), a dual-USB 3.0 hub, a headphone jack and two 7W integrated speakers. You also get a remote controller.

Alternatives

Now, there are 43″ 4K monitors with 120Hz such as the ASUS XG438Q and the Acer CG437K, but these cost around $1,100 – $1,500 yet they don’t offer a better HDR image quality than the Philips 436M6.

At that price range, you’d be better off with an LG OLED TV, such as the 55″ BX or the 48″ CX model.

They offer an incomparably better HDR picture quality and 4K 120Hz support over HDMI 2.1 allowing you to take advantage of its high refresh rate on future-gen consoles, as well as on PC.

So, if you’re interested in other 32″ and 43″ 4K 144Hz gaming monitors with HDMI 2.1, keep your eyes on the upcoming 2021 models, such as the ASUS XG43UQ, the ViewSonic XG320U, and the Acer XB323QK.

Best 4K Professional Monitors

Looking for a 4K monitor for color-editing, graphic design, or similar professional use?

The following models will make sure that the content you create looks as good as it can.

We also have a dedicated guide with the best monitors for photo and video editing.

The Pros:

  • Accurate and consistent colors out of the box
  • Versatile design and rich connectivity options
  • Plenty of exclusive features

The Cons:

  • None

About The Monitor

If you’re looking for a 4K monitor for professional color-critical work, the ViewSonic VP2768-4K PRO is for you!

Image Quality

Now, you get your standard 27″ 4K IPS panel specifications, such as a 350-nit peak brightness, a 1,300:1 contrast ratio, 178° viewing angles and dithered 10-bit color depth support. However, what makes this monitor ideal for color-critical work is the Delta E < 2 factory-calibration.

While the ViewSonic VP2768-4K is ready for serious work straight out of the box, it also supports 14-bit 3D LUT and hardware calibration, allowing you to maintain flawless accuracy over time.

And that’s not all: it’s also equipped with a plethora of useful features, including preset colors (sRGB, Rec709, EBU, SMPTE-C, DICOM SIM, Native, Custom and three custom calibration profiles) and advanced image adjustment tools (6 gamma modes, 6-axis hue/saturation and sharpness).

You’ll even find some gaming features, such as Black Stabilization, but there’s no variable refresh rate support. Still, thanks to the vibrant colors and quick response time of the monitor’s IPS panel, games will look great and run smoothly.

There’s even a uniformity compensation feature that improves brightness and color uniformity, though at a cost of contrast ratio.

Design & Connectivity

viewsonic vp2768 monitor back

The ViewSonic VP2768-4K has a sturdy and versatile stand with up to 130mm height adjustment, +/- 60° swivel, +/- 90° pivot, -5°/21° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options are excellent as well and include DisplayPort 1.2, mini-DisplayPort 1.2, two HDMI 2.0 ports, a headphone jack and a quad-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

If you need a 27″ 4K monitor with a wider color gamut, check out the Acer CM3271K with 99% Adobe RGB, DisplayHDR 400 and Delta E < 2 factory-calibration.

The Pros:

  • Accurate and consistent colors out of the box
  • Versatile design and rich connectivity options
  • Plenty of exclusive features

The Cons:

  • None

About The Monitor

Friendly advice: for the price of a 32″ 4K IPS monitor with sRGB color gamut and factory calibration, you can get a smaller 27″ 4K IPS monitor with a wider Adobe RGB color gamut, so if you want a 32″ model, you have to pay the premium.

The ViewSonic VP3268-4K is essentially the 32″ version of the VP2768-4K and offers the same features, include Delta E < 2 factory-calibration, support for hardware calibration, 14-bit 3D LUT and the works.

Now, it also supports HDR10, but it can only accept and display the HDR signal, it can’t actually improve the image quality, as expected from a 32″ 4K IPS monitor at this price range.

Design & Connectivity

ViewSonic VP3268 2K PRO Monitor Back

In comparison to the 27″ variant, the VP3268-4K has a thinner bottom bezel, same ergonomic versatility and identical connectivity options plus dual 5W integrated speakers.

Alternatives

If you’re looking for something with a wider color gamut, check out the ASUS PA329C with Adobe RGB, 98% DCI-P3, 14-bit 3D LUT and Delta E < 2 factory-calibration.

In case you want the absolute best 4K professional monitor, keep an eye on LG’s upcoming OLED displays or check out the Dell UP3221Q with a 2000-zone Mini-LED FALD backlight.

Conclusion

Were you able to find the best 4K monitor for you?

If not, feel free to leave us any questions you might have in the comments below, and we will gladly assist you.

Overall, for everyday use and casual gaming, the ASUS VG289Q, the LG 32UL500, and the Philips 328E1CA offer great value for the price. 

If you want to kick it up a notch, you can’t go wrong with the LG 32UN650, the LG 27GN950, or the ASUS PG27UQ, depending on your budget.

As far as 4K monitors for professional use go, all monitors we’ve included provide an exquisite image quality and performance, just make sure you get the display with the right specifications (proper color gamut, etc.) for you.

Updates +

  • May 27, 2021:
    – Improved readability overall
  • February 16, 2021:
    – Added the LG 32UN650 and the Philips 328E1CA.
    – Replaced the Dell U2718Q with the ViewSonic VP2768-4K, and the BenQ PD3200U with the ViewSonic VP3268-4K. Added LG’s upcoming OLED monitors and the Dell UP3221Q as high-end professional monitor alternatives to the VP3268-4K.
    – Removed the ASUS CG32UQ.

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Rob Shafer
Rob Shafer

Rob is a software engineer with a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver. He now works full-time managing DisplayNinja while coding his own projects on the side.