The Best 4K Monitors (2024 Reviews)

Check out the best 4K 60Hz monitors for PC gaming, console gaming, and everyday use, as well as all you need to know before buying one!

Having trouble deciding which 4K UHD monitor is the perfect fit for you?

You’ve come to the right place!

Whether you’re looking for an economical but good 4K monitor for everyday use or the best 4K 60Hz display for PC/console gaming, we’ll make sure you pick the best one for your preferences and budget.

These are the best 4K monitors currently available in 2024.

As we now have a dedicated best 4K 144Hz (HDMI 2.1) gaming monitor buyer’s guide, we’ll focus on the best 4K monitors with a maximum refresh rate of 60Hz here.

TypeMonitorSizePanelRefresh RateVRR 
Best 27-28" 4K Monitors27”IPS70HzNone
28”IPS60HzFreeSync
27”IPS60HzN/A
27”OLED60HzN/A
Best 32" 4K Monitors32”VA60HzFreeSync
32”VA60HzFreeSync
32”IPS70HzFreeSync
32”OLED60HzNone
Best 43" 4K Monitors43”IPS60HzNone
43”VA60HzNone
budget pick

Sceptre U325W-UPT

Sceptre U325W UPT
  • AMD FreeSync up to 70Hz
  • Wide color gamut
  • Wide viewing angles
best value

Innocn 27M2U

Innocn 27M2U D
  • 1152-zone mini LED FALD
  • 99% Adobe RGB and DCI-P3
  • 1000-nits peak brightness
best overall

Innocn 32Q1U

Innocn 32Q1U
  • Infinite contrast ratio
  • 99% Adobe RGB and DCI-P3
  • 540-nits peak brightness

All monitors feature modern flicker-free screens with integrated low blue light filters, which will prevent eye fatigue caused by prolonged use of the display.

Rest assured that these monitors are reliable, thoroughly tested, and offer the best value for the money in their respective categories.

Additionally, feel free to leave us a comment below if you need help picking a new monitor.

You can also view our changelogs for this buying guide at the end of this article.

Best 27-28″ 4K 60Hz Monitors

Looking for a 27″ or 28″ sized 4K monitor for that incredible detail clarity thanks to the high pixel density? These are the best models currently available!

The Pros:

  • Accurate and consistent colors
  • Wide viewing angles
  • Affordable

The Cons:

  • Tilt-only stand
  • No AMD FreeSync
  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

Looking for the most affordable 4K monitor that’s actually worth the price?

The Sceptre U275W-UPT is an excellent 4K UHD display for casual gaming, work and content consumption – and it’s available for under $200!

Image Quality

Based on an IPS panel with dithered 10-bit color support, the Sceptre U275W-UPT delivers amazing picture quality with precise colors.

Panel-related specs include the standard 1,000:1 contrast ratio, 178-degree wide viewing angles, a 350-nit peak brightness and a fast 5ms response time speed for minimal ghosting of fast-moving objects.

The Sceptre U275W-UPT also covers the entire sRGB color space for accurate and consistent colors.

Lastly, 4K Ultra HD resolution on 27″ screens provides you with roughly 163 pixels per inch, which results in stunning detail clarity and plenty of available screen real estate.

So, you’ll need to scale your interface for small items such as text to be readable.

1080p monitor vs 4K (Scaling)

Features

One thing that’s missing from the Sceptre U275W-UPT is support for variable refresh rate (VRR), such as AMD FreeSync – though some gamers might be able to overlook this given the price.

You will find standard as well as advanced image adjustment tools in the monitor’s OSD menu, including gamma, sharpness, aspect ratio, color temperature, brightness, contrast, etc.

Design & Connectivity

Sceptre U275W UPT Design

The Sceptre U275W-UPT has ultra-thin bezels and it’s VESA mount compatible (100x100mm), but the stand is tilt-only (-5°/20°).

Connectivity includes two HDMI 1.4 ports, HDMI 2.0, DisplayPort 1.2, a headphone jack and two 2W built-in speakers.

Alternatives

  • Philips 278E1A – similar to the Sceptre U275W-UPT, usually more expensive

In case the Sceptre U275W-UPT is not available or overpriced, consider the LG 27UL500 and the Dell S2721QS. These monitors use the same 27″ 4K IPS panel with sRGB color gamut, but also support FreeSync up to 60Hz.

The Pros:

  • Wide color gamut
  • Wide viewing angles
  • Plenty of features including FreeSync

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)
  • Tilt-only stand

About The Monitor

If you’re looking for something a bit more suited for gaming, we recommend the MSI G281UV.

Image Quality

For the most part, the MSI G281UV offers identical specifications as the Sceptre U275W – 350-nit peak brightness, 1000:1 contrast ratio and 10-bit color depth support.

However, it also supports a wider 95% DCI-P3 gamut coverage for more saturated and rich colors! Additionally, it has a slightly but noticeably larger 28″ screen, which still offers a high pixel density for crisp details.

Features

Moving on, the MSI G281UV 28″ 4K monitor offers lots of useful gaming features including Night Vision for better visibility in dark games, customizable crosshairs, on-screen timers and picture presets.

Further, the monitor supports AMD FreeSync which eliminates all screen tearing and stuttering between 40-60Hz/FPS (Frames Per Second) if you have a FreeSync-compatible graphics card.

FreeSync is supported over both HDMI and DisplayPort, so you can use it with compatible Xbox consoles too.

Design & Connectivity

MSI G281UV Design

The MSI G281UV has a tilt-only stand, but it’s VESA mount compatible.

Connectivity includes two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.2 and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

  • ASUS VG289Q – monitor with the same panel and a fully ergonomic stand, but goes for up to $70 more

If you’re after a 27″ 4K 60Hz monitor for color-critical work, we recommend the Dell U2723QE.

The Pros:

  • Wide 99% Adobe RGB/DCI-P3 color gamut; wide viewing angles
  • 1152-zone mini LED FALD
  • 1000-nits peak brightness
  • Fully ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options; USB-C 65W PD

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming in some scenes
  • No AMD FreeSync

About The Monitor

If you want a proper HDR display and don’t need a high refresh rate, the Innocn 27M2U-D might be for you.

It’s basically the 60Hz version of the Innocn 27M2V with a 160Hz refresh rate, and it goes for around $300 less.

Image Quality

The Innocn 27M2U-D has an 1152-zone mini LED FALD (full-array local dimming) backlight. These zones can dim parts of the image that are supposed to be dark without greatly affecting the areas that are supposed to be bright, thus significantly increasing the contrast ratio.

In some demanding scenes (stars in the night sky, fireworks, etc.), the light that’s illuminating a small bright object can bleed into the surrounding dimmed zones and create blooming. This is an expected drawback of this technology and most users find it tolerable considering it only occurs in certain scenes.

Edge lit Dimming vs Full array Dimming

Additionally, the Innocn 27M2U-D has an exceptional color gamut covering 99% of both DCI-P3 and Adobe RGB color spaces! It even has dedicated color modes for each color space (Adobe RGB, DCI-P3 and sRGB).

Further, it’s factory calibrated at Delta E < 2 and has a stellar 1000-nit HDR peak brightness (450-nits for SDR). As a result, you get a picture with deep blacks, bright highlights and vibrant colors.

Design & Connectivity

Innocn 27M2U D Design

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 120mm, 90° pivot, -5°/20° tilt, +/- 25° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DP 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports, USB-C with DP Alt Mode and 65W Power Delivery and a headphone jack.

The Pros:

  • Wide 99% Adobe RGB/DCI-P3 color gamut; wide viewing angles
  • Infinite contrast ratio
  • 540-nits peak brightness
  • Fully ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options; USB-C 90W PD, KVM

The Cons:

  • Risk of burn-in
  • No AMD FreeSync

About The Monitor

Want an even better HDR display? Check out the Philips 27E1N8900 with an OLED panel!

Image Quality

OLED panels have per-pixel dimming as each pixel produces its own light, meaning that they can individually completely turn off for true blacks and a basically infinite contrast ratio. This also means that there are no blooming, backlight bleeding, glowing or other visual artifacts related to LED-backlit panels.

Another advantage is that the pixels can change instantaneously, so there’s no trailing behind fast-moving objects.

Just like the Innocn 27M2U, the Philips 27E1N8900 has an impressive color gamut with 99% Adobe RGB and 99% DCI-P3 color space coverage, as well as professional-grade Delta E < 1 factory calibration. Further, it has a true 10-bit panel for less banding.

The main disadvantage of OLED panels is the lower brightness. However, with a 540-nits HDR peak brightness and 250-nits peak for a 100% white window, the Philips 27E1N8900 can still deliver a comfortable viewing experience with punchy highlights – it’s just not as bright as some LED-backlit panels.

Unlike the OLED gaming monitors based on LG’s W-OLED or Samsung’s QD-OLED panels with peculiar subpixel layouts, the Philips 27E1N8900 uses a JOLED panel with the standard RGB layout, so you won’t have any issues with fringing on small text and fine details.

Another drawback of OLED technology is the risk of permanent image burn-in when viewing content with bright static elements. However, as long as you’re using the monitor sensibly and take advantage of burn-in prevention features (Smart Brightness Limiter, Screen Saver and Pixel Orbiting), it shouldn’t be an issue.

Design & Connectivity

Philips 27E1N8900 Design

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 130mm, 90° pivot, +/- 175° swivel, -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DP 1.4, USB-C (DP Alt Mode, 90W PD), a quad-USB 3.0 hub (1 upstream + 4 downstream), a headphone jack and integrated KVM functionality.

Alternatives

Best 32″ 4K 60Hz Monitors

Interested in a larger 32″ 4K monitor? Here are the best models!

The Pros:

  • Built-in speakers
  • Wide color gamut
  • High contrast ratio
  • AMD FreeSync

The Cons:

  • Minor ghosting in fast-paced games, mainly in darker scenes
  • Tilt-only stand
  • Narrow viewing angles

About The Monitor

Do you want an affordable 32″ monitor with 4K UHD resolution?

You’ll have to settle with one with a VA panel as the IPS models are more expensive. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing as VA panels have their advantages too.

Image Quality

This monitor’s VA panel offers a superb contrast ratio of 3,000:1. In comparison to IPS and TN panel monitors, you get deeper black shades and an overall better relation between the darkest and the brightest tones.

Now, the colors aren’t as consistent as that of the previously-mentioned IPS models, but they are good nonetheless and, in fact, much better than what you might find on any TN display.

As if that’s not enough, the LG 32UL500 even has a wide 95% DCI-P3 color gamut and it supports HDR, which will make the colors of compatible content more punchy and lifelike.

It has a peak luminance of 300-nits, which is plenty for an enjoyable viewing experience under normal lighting conditions. Still, it’s not enough for VESA’s DisplayHDR 400 certification, which requires a peak brightness of at least 400-nits.

Regardless, thanks to the wide color gamut and high native contrast ratio, HDR content will look better than SDR. Note that this still provides just a glimpse of what HDR can actually do.

Here’s why: for a notable improvement in HDR picture quality, an LED-backlit display should have at least DisplayHDR 600 certification or ideally, DisplayHDR 1000 or over, and full-array local dimming.

VA panels also don’t have as wide viewing angles as the IPS models, so the picture will degrade a bit when looked at an angle.

Check out our LG 32UL500 review for more information and comparison between similar models.

Features

The LG 32UL500 supports AMD FreeSync over both HDMI and DisplayPort with a 40-60Hz VRR range.

As it is a VA panel display, some smearing will be noticeable behind fast-moving objects, mainly in darker scenes.

Design & Connectivity

lg 32ul500 monitor back

The LG 32UL500 monitor has a tilt-only stand (-5°/15°), but it’s VESA mount compatible (100x100mm).

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.2, a headphone jack and dual 5W built-in speakers.

Alternatives

  • Samsung M70B – A 32″ 4K VA monitor with built-in smart features, such as streaming apps, DeX and Microsoft 365

The Pros:

  • Built-in speakers
  • Wide color gamut and high contrast ratio
  • AMD FreeSync

The Cons:

  • Minor ghosting in fast-paced games, mainly in darker scenes
  • Tilt-only stand
  • Narrow FreeSync range

About The Monitor

Interested in something a bit different?

Check out the Philips 328E1CA with a 1500R screen curvature!

Image Quality

Monitors with curved screens make the most sense with 21:9 ultrawide displays, but some users prefer the curvature even on regular 16:9 widescreen monitors.

Usually, curved widescreen monitors ranging from 24″ to 27″ have curvatures of 1500R or 1800R, which is not that noticeable or effective, but the 1500R curve is quite eye-catching on the 32″ sized screen of the Philips 328E1CA.

The curvature provides a bit of extra depth to the picture and increases immersion, but not everyone will be a fan of it. Some will love it straight away, others will despise it, and some will just need a bit of time to get used to it.

Now, the VA panel of the Philips 328E1CA also provides better viewing angles than the previously mentioned flat-screen alternatives, so you won’t get as noticeable gamma/saturation shifts at different angles.

It has a somewhat weaker peak brightness of 250-nits and a static contrast ratio of 2,500:1, while its 120% sRGB color gamut provides some extra color vibrancy.

Features

The Philips 328E1CA monitor has a rather narrow FreeSync range of 48-60Hz, but it’s supported over both HDMI and DisplayPort.

All in all, the image quality and performance between the 328E1CA and BenQ’s flat-screen model is very similar, the main difference is that Philips’ monitor has a bit wider viewing angles and a curved screen — so, it’s all up to your preference.

Design & Connectivity

Philips 328E1CA Monitor Back

The stand of the monitor is tilt-only by -5°/20°, but the screen is VESA mount compatible via the 100x100mm VESA pattern.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.2, two HDMI 2.0 ports, a headphone jack and dual 3W built-in speakers.

Alternatives

There are two more models that use the same panel, but they’re usually more expensive yet the difference in image quality, performance and features are minimal, certainly not worth the extra ~$100.

The Pros:

  • Built-in speakers
  • Wide color gamut
  • Wide viewing angles
  • AMD FreeSync

The Cons:

  • Tilt-only stand
  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

32″ 4K IPS monitors are much more expensive (~$400+) than the VA models as they’re mainly intended for professional use, but the Sceptre U325W-UPT is available for around $250!

Obviously, it doesn’t have the premium feature of $400+ models, such as professional-grade factory calibration, but thanks to its IPS panel, you still get consistent colors and wide viewing angles, as well as fast response time speed.

Image Quality

Here’s the deal: the Sceptre U325W-UPT has a static contrast ratio of 1,000:1, so you won’t get as deep blacks as in the previously mentioned VA models.

However, you get wide color gamut support (95% DCI-P3) and, if you have more people in the room looking at the screen, the picture won’t degrade at an angle.

Additionally, it has a fast pixel response time speed, which makes the monitor great for fast-paced games.

The monitor also supports AMD FreeSync and has a 70Hz refresh rate for a small boost in motion clarity in comparison to 60Hz.

Design & Connectivity

Sceptre U325W UPT Design

The monitor has a tilt-only stand, but the screen is VESA mount compatible via the 100x100mm pattern.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 inputs, two DisplayPort 1.4 inputs, a headphone jack and dual 2W integrated speakers.

Alternatives

The next cheapest 32″ 4K 60Hz IPS monitor is the LG 32UP83A, which also has a USB-C port with 60W Power Delivery, a USB hub and an ergonomic stand for ~$390.

If you want a 32″ 4K 60Hz monitor for color-critical work, check out the Dell U3223QE with an IPS Black panel.

The Pros:

  • Wide 99% Adobe RGB/DCI-P3 color gamut; wide viewing angles
  • Infinite contrast ratio
  • 540-nits peak brightness
  • Fully ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options; USB-C 90W PD

The Cons:

  • Risk of burn-in
  • No AMD FreeSync
  • No standard DP/HDMI ports

About The Monitor

The Innocn 32Q1U is basically a 32″ version of the Philips 27E1N8900!

Image Quality

Just like the Philips 27E1N8900, the Innocn 32Q1U uses a JOLED panel with the standard RGB subpixel layout, true 10-bit color depth, a 540-nit peak bright brightness (250-nits full field white), 99% Adobe RGB and DCP-P3 color gamut, and Delta E < 1 factory calibration.

OLED inherent strengths and weaknesses are naturally present as well, including the infinite contrast ratio, instantaneous response time speed and the risk of burn-in.

Both monitors are priced around the same, so the choice between the two will mainly come down to your personal preference regarding the screen size, though the Innocn 32Q1U doesn’t have quite as many connectivity options.

Design & Connectivity

Innocn 32Q1U Design

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 120mm, +/- 30° swivel, -5°/15° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two USB-C ports with DP Alt Mode and 90W Power Delivery (45W if using both ports) and an additional USB-C port for audio (a USB-C to 3.5mm jack is provided).

Alternatives

  • LG 32EP950, 32BP95E – LG’s models based on the same (or similar panel), but they have been discontinued
  • ASUS PA32DC – ASUS’ model with built-in calibration, shading hood and more premium features, but it’s significantly more expensive ($3,000+)
  • ASUS PA32DCM – ASUS’ upcoming model with Thunderbolt 4 and even higher brightness; though there’s no word on pricing and availability yet

You might also be interested in the Dell UltraSharp U3224KB with a 6K (6144×3456) resolution or the Apple Pro Display XDR (6016×3384).

While these displays do offer an exceptionally sharp image quality with ~220 PPI (pixels per inch), they are too expensive; Dell’s model with a Nano IPS Black panel goes for $2500, while Apple’s IPS monitor goes for $5000 – $7000 (depending on the glass finish).

The main issue is that the Pro Display XDR has only 576 dimming zones, which doesn’t have a good enough backlight control for professional HDR editing, while the Dell U3224KB only has a 600-nit peak brightness.

So, while you may consider these displays due to their high resolution and other features, keep in mind that they’re mainly niche luxury products with poor value for the money.

Best 43″ 4K 60Hz Monitors

Need a bigger screen for all your spreadsheets or for a more immersive viewing experience? Here are the best 43″ 4K monitors!

The Pros:

  • Built-in 10W speakers
  • Wide viewing angles
  • Rich connectivity options, including USB-C with 65W PD

The Cons:

  • Tilt-only stand
  • BGR subpixel layout
  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)
  • No AMD FreeSync

About The Monitor

In case you want a 43″ 4K IPS display for everyday, office-related and mixed use, we recommend the LG 43SQ700S.

Image Quality

The 4K UHD resolution looks sharp even on 43″ sized screens with a decent pixel density of 103 pixels per inch. The monitor is basically equivalent to four 22″ 1080p displays in a 2×2 setup.

Sadly, like all 43″ displays, the LG 43SQ700S has a BGR subpixel layout, which makes text appear somewhat fringy. With proper ClearType settings, it can be improved and if you’re still bothered by it, you can use scaling to make it even less noticeable, but you sacrifice screen real estate in the process.

The IPS panel ensures accurate colors with full sRGB coverage, wide viewing angles, dithered 10-bit color depth support, a decent 300-nit peak brightness and a standard contrast ratio of 1,200:1.

The LG 43SQ700S has built-in webOS with plenty smart features, including streaming apps, Screen Share, Apple AirPlay 2, voice assistance and more.

Design & Connectivity

LG 43SQ700S Design

The design is tilt-only and not VESA mount compatible.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, a USB type C port (DP 1.4 Alt Mode and 65W PD), dual 10W integrated speakers, three USB 2.0 downstream ports, WiFi and Bluetooth.

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio
  • Built-in speakers, WiFi/Bluetooth and Smart features
  • Rich connectivity options, including USB-C with 65W PD

The Cons:

  • Tilt-only stand
  • BGR subpixel layout
  • No AMD FreeSync

About The Monitor

In case you don’t need wide viewing angles and consistent colors, the Samsung M70B is the best 43″ 4K VA monitor you can get for the money.

Image Quality

The 43″ M70B Samsung monitor has a high contrast ratio of 5,000:1, resulting in inky blacks and bright whites.

The peak brightness is okay at 300-nits, so the screen will be able to get bright enough under normal lighting conditions, but for particularly bright rooms without blinds/curtains, it might be too dim.

Further, the monitor covers the entire sRGB color space, so the colors are vivid and not over-saturated when viewing SDR content. HDR is supported, but due to lack of wide color gamut, brightness and local dimming, it’s meaningless.

Just like the LG 43SQ700S, the Samsung M70B has a BGR subpixel layout.

Moving on, the monitor is based on TizenOS and has built-in smart features, including streaming apps, DeX, AirPlay 2 and Microsoft 365.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung 43 inch M70B Design

The stand of the monitor is tilt-only, but there’s a 200x200mm pattern for VESA mounting. Connectivity options include USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode, 65W PD), two HDMI 2.0 ports, WiFi, Bluetooth, three USB 2.0 ports and decent built-in speakers.

Conclusion

Were you able to find the best 4K monitor for you?

If not, feel free to leave us any questions you might have in the comments below, and we will gladly assist you.

Overall, for everyday use and casual gaming, the MSI G281UV and the Sceptre U325W-UPT offer excellent value for the money.

For HDR, we recommend the Innocn 27M2U, the Philips 27E1N8900 or the Innocn 32Q1U, depending on your budget and personal preference.

Finally, if you want a larger display, the Samsung M70B and the LG 43SQ700S smart displays are excellent picks.

Updates +

  • November 16, 2023:
    – Replaced the Philips 278E1A with the Sceptre U275W-UPT, the LG 32UN650 with the Sceptre U325W-UPT, the ASUS VG289Q with the MSI G281UV, the LG 43UN700 with the LG 43SQ700S and the Samsung M70A with the M70B.
    – Added the Innocn 32Q1U, the Philips 27E1N8900 and the Innocn 27M2U.
  • November 24, 2022:
    – Added the Innocn 27M2U.
  • February 10, 2022:
    – Added the Samsung 43M70A.
    – Removed the ViewSonic VP2768-4K Pro and VP3268-4K Pro. Visit our dedicated best photo/video editing monitor guide for the best 4K monitors for professional use.
  • December 14, 2021:
    – Added review summaries for the monitors that were missing them.
  • November 24, 2021:
    – Checked up on the guide to ensure that our picks are still the best options available.
  • August 13, 2021:
    – Added the Philips 278E1A.
    – Replaced the LG 32UL500 with the BenQ EW3270U.
    – Removed the LG 27GN950 and the ASUS PG27UQ as we now have a dedicated 4K 144Hz monitor buyer’s guide.
    – Removed the Philips 436M6VBPAB.
    – Added the LG 43UN700 to the table. A dedicated review section will be added soon.
  • May 27, 2021:
    – Improved readability overall
  • February 16, 2021:
    – Added the LG 32UN650 and the Philips 328E1CA.
    – Replaced the Dell U2718Q with the ViewSonic VP2768-4K and the BenQ PD3200U with the ViewSonic VP3268-4K. Added LG’s upcoming OLED monitors and the Dell UP3221Q as high-end professional monitor alternatives to the VP3268-4K.
    – Removed the ASUS CG32UQ.

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Rob Shafer

Rob is a software engineer with a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver. He now works full-time managing DisplayNinja while coding his own projects on the side.