The Best FreeSync Premium Pro Monitors (2024 Reviews)

Check out the best FreeSync Premium Pro monitors (formerly FreeSync 2) currently available as well as everything you need to know about them before buying.

Are you searching for the best gaming monitor to pair with your AMD graphics card?

Then you should definitely consider FreeSync Premium Pro (previously branded as FreeSync 2) gaming monitors in order to get the smoothest performance and best HDR image quality out of compatible games.

There are various FreeSync Premium Pro displays out there, so we’ve narrowed down your selection to only the absolute best and the most cost-effective models available! 

MonitorSizeResolutionPanelRefresh Rate 
27"2560x1440VA180Hz
32"3840x2160VA165Hz
32"3840x2160IPS160Hz
34"3440x1440OLED165Hz
32"3840x2160OLED240Hz
39"3440x1440OLED240Hz
49"5120x1440OLED240Hz
49”5120x1440VA240Hz
57"7680x2160VA240Hz
55"3840x2160VA165Hz
*Recommended monitor - a review section will be added soon
budget pick

AOC Q27G3XMN

AOC Q27G3XMN Monitor
  • 336-zone mini LED FALD
  • 1200-nits peak brightness
  • 27″ 1440p 180Hz
best value

Dell AW3423DWF

Dell AW3423DWF Monitor
  • Infinite contrast ratio
  • 1000-nits peak brightness
  • 34″ 3440×1440 165Hz
premium pick

Samsung OLED G9

Samsung S49CG95
  • Infinite contrast ratio
  • 1000-nits peak brightness
  • 49″ 5120×1440 240Hz

So, what does the FreeSync Premium Pro certification mean exactly?

AMD has three FreeSync tiers: the original FreeSync technology, FreeSync Premium, and FreeSync Premium Pro.

FreeSync provides a variable refresh rate for supported cards over DP and HDMI (depending on the monitor).

FreeSync Premium has a bit more demanding requirements – the monitor must have at least a 120Hz refresh rate, low input lag, and support for LFC (Low Framerate Compensation).

LFC allows the variable refresh rate to continue working below the monitor’s dynamic range by doubling or tripling the frame rate.

For instance, if your FPS drops to 47FPS on a monitor with a 48-144Hz VRR range, LFC will change the monitor’s refresh rate to 94Hz for smoother performance, and so on.

FreeSync Premium Pro has the same requirements as FreeSync Premium (at least 120Hz, low input lag, and LFC) – plus a few conditions regarding the monitor’s HDR (High Dynamic Range) support.

FreeSync Premium Pro

Besides being able to accept and display the HDR10 signal, a FreeSync Premium Pro monitor must also have a wider color gamut (at least 90% DCI-P3) and a higher peak brightness (at least 400-nits) than a standard display.

Additionally, there are FreeSync Premium Pro video games that use the full potential of these monitors by proper HDR gamut and tone mapping, which ensures optimal picture quality with minimal input lag.

What about other HDR games?

In video games that don’t support FreeSync Premium Pro, the HDR picture quality will vary from game to game and depend on the monitor’s HDR capabilities.

Luckily, almost all modern gaming monitors have low input lag, so latency won’t be an issue when it comes to HDR.

Also, note that while you can use both FreeSync and HDR with compatible NVIDIA graphics cards, you cannot use the FreeSync Premium Pro HDR option in games that support it.

Unfortunately, despite the FreeSync Premium Pro certification, some units of the VA panel monitors included in this guide will have the infamous FreeSync brightness flickering issue.

The Pros:

  • 336-zone mini LED FALD
  • 1200-nits peak brightness
  • Wide color gamut
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 180Hz
  • Ergonomic stand

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes
  • Minor ghosting

About The Monitor

If you want the best budget FreeSync Premium Pro monitor, we recommend the AOC Q27G3XMN.

Image Quality

The AOC Q27G3XMN is the most affordable display that has a full-array local dimming (FALD) solution, which is essential for proper HDR image quality on LED-backlit displays.

It has 336 dimming zones that spread across the screen. These zones dim the areas that are supposed to be dark without greatly affecting the areas that are supposed to remain bright, thus significantly boosting the contrast ratio.

In comparison, a regular display would need to increase the brightness of its entire screen to reach maximum brightness and decrease it to 0 to get deepest blacks.

There are edge-lit panels with fewer dimming zones (usually from 8 to 32), but since they’re arranged either on top/bottom or left/right part of the screen, they create awful banding in most scenes.

Edge lit Dimming vs Full array Dimming

This is why FALD (or an OLED panel) is a must for proper HDR!

Now, in some demanding scenes (fireworks, subtitles, stars in a night sky, etc.), some light from the small illuminated object will bleed into the surrounding dimmed zones and create blooming. However, this is an expected drawback of this technology and most users will find it tolerable.

The AOC Q27G3XMN also has an impressive color gamut with 96% DCI-P3 and 90% Adobe RGB gamut coverage, as well as an exceptional peak brightness of 1200-nits!

Its 1440p QHD resolution provides you with a decent pixel density of 108 PPI (pixels per inch) for sharp details and text without being too demanding on your GPU.

Moreover, it supports VRR up to 180Hz for smooth and tear-free gameplay performance. While the AOC Q27G3XMN is faster than the usual VA panel displays, there is some minor ghosting noticeable behind fast-moving objects (mainly in dark scenes), but most gamers will find it tolerable or even negligible.

Check out our full AOC Q27G3XMN review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

AOC Q27G3XMN Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers height up to 130mm, pivot by 90°, -5°/23° tilt, +/- 30° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports and a headphone jack.

The Pros:

  • 1196-zone mini LED FALD
  • 1200-nits peak brightness
  • Wide color gamut
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 165Hz
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes

About The Monitor

Want a bit better FreeSync Premium Pro display? Check out the Samsung Neo G7!

Image Quality

The Samsung Neo G7 has a 32″ 4K panel, so besides getting a bigger screen, you also get a higher resolution to back it up! 4K looks incredibly crisp even on 32″ sized displays with roughly 140 PPI (pixels per inch) for sharper details and text.

Moreover, the Neo G7 has 1196 dimming zones for even better backlight control, resulting in less blooming artifacts, while keeping the stellar 1200-nit peak brightness.

You also get a wide 95% DCI-P3 color gamut and VRR up to 165Hz. The colors aren’t quite as vibrant on the Neo G7 as they’re on the AOC Q27G3XMN, but you get a faster pixel response time speed for zero ghosting in fast-paced games.

Check out our full Neo G7 review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung S32BG75 Review

The stand of the monitor offers up to 120mm height adjustment, +/- 15° swivel, +/- 90° pivot, -9°/13° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

The screen has a steep 1000R curvature for added immersion, though some users might find the screen curvature too aggressive – it does take some time to get used to.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports with 40 Gbps and DSC, a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

The Samsung Odyssey Neo G8 model has a higher 240Hz refresh rate, but it has scanline issues. Considering how demanding 4K UHD is for high frame rates with decent picture settings in most games, we recommend the cheaper Neo G7.

The Pros:

  • 576-zone mini LED FALD
  • 1200-nits peak brightness
  • Wide color gamut
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 160Hz
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub, USB-C 90W PD, KVM

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes

About The Monitor

In case you’d rather have a flat-screen 32″ FreeSync Premium Pro display, there’s the Acer Predator X32FP!

Image Quality

Unlike the Neo G7, the X32FP uses an IPS panel with wider viewing angles and a wider 99% DCI-P3 and Adobe RGB color gamut. So, you get more accurate, consistent and vibrant colors.

The downside is that the X32FP has a lower native contrast ratio and fewer dimming zones (576), which means that there will be more blooming artifacts in demanding scenes.

The peak brightness is the same at around 1200-nits, and you get VRR support up to 160Hz with a rapid pixel response time speed, but the X32FP also offers better connectivity options.

So, the choice between the two will mainly come down to your personal preference.

Check out our full X32FP review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Acer Predator X32 FP Monitor Design

The stand is sturdy and offers height adjustment up to 130mm, +/- 30° swivel, -5°/35° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include four HDMI 2.1 ports, DP 1.4 with DSC, USB-C, a quad-USB 3.0 hub, a headphone jack, two 7W built-in speakers and KVM.

Alternatives

There’s also the ASUS PG32UQXR, based on the same panel as the Acer X32FP.

However, it’s usually $300 more expensive and although it has DisplayPort 2.1, the DP 1.4 does just fine on the X32FP thanks to DSC, which is a visually lossless compression.

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio
  • Decent peak brightness
  • Instantaneous response time
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 165Hz
  • Ergonomic design, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Risk of burn-in (covered by warranty)
  • Peculiar subpixel layout causes minor fringing on small text and fine details

About The Monitor

Interested in an OLED display? The Dell Alienware AW3423DWF offers exceptional value for the money!

Image Quality

OLED displays have per-pixel dimming as each pixel can be individually turned off for true blacks and an infinite contrast ratio. This also means that there’s no blooming, glowing, backlight bleeding or other visual artifacts related to LED-backlit panels.

The downside is that OLED displays can’t get quite as bright as some LED-backlit panels, but the Dell AW3423DWF uses Samsung’s QD-OLED panel with an excellent brightness performance of up to 1000-nits for small HDR highlights and 250-nits for a full white field.

Additionally, the AW3423DWF offers superior color gamut volume (colors are brighter) with a 99% DCI-P3 color space coverage.

The ultrawide format also improves the viewing experience by extending your field of view with compatible content. It’s basically a 27″ 2560×1440 display that’s ~33% wider!

Next, OLED displays also have instantaneous pixel response time speed for zero ghosting behind fast-moving objects, while VRR is supported up to 165Hz for tear-free gameplay.

The main disadvantage is the risk of permanent image burn-in when viewing content with bright static elements for too long. However, as long as you’re using the screen sensibly and taking advantage of the built-in burn-in prevention features, it shouldn’t be an issue. Dell even offers a 3-year warranty that covers burn-in.

Another thing to keep in mind is that the AW3423DWF and other 34″ 3440×1440 QD-OLED models use a triangular RGB subpixel layout that causes minor fringing on small text and fine details. This isn’t noticeable in games and videos. It’s barely noticeable during everyday use (web browsing, etc.) and most users won’t mind it.

Check out our full Dell AW3423DWF review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Dell AW3423DWF Review

The stand of the monitor is robust and versatile with up to 110mm height adjustment, -5°/21° tilt, +/- 20° swivel, +/- 4° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

The screen has a subtle 1800R curvature and a semi-glossy finish with an anti-reflective treatment. So, it offers a clearer picture than that of displays with matte anti-glare coatings, but blacks are raised when the screen is hit by direct lighting.

Connectivity options include two DisplayPort 1.4 inputs, HDMI 2.0 (limited to 100Hz), a headphone jack, line-out and a quad-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

 Dell AW3423DWFMSI MEG342CSamsung OLED G8Philips Evnia 34M2C8600
Max. Refresh Rate165Hz (120Hz 10-bit)175Hz 10-bit175Hz 10-bit175Hz 10-bit
Ports2x DP 1.4,
1x HDMI 2.0,
4x USB
1x DP 1.4
2x HDMI 2.1
1x USB-C (65W PD)
4x USB
1x Mini-DP 1.4,
1x micro HDMI 2.1
1x USB-C (65W PD)
1x USB-C
1x DP 1.4,
2x HDMI 2.0,
1x USB-C (90W PD),
4x USB
Cooling fans11None1
HDR
(AMD GPUs)
GoodGoodBad*Bad**
HDR
(NVIDIA GPUs)
GoodGoodGoodBad**
PiP/PbPYesYesNoYes
Ambient Light SensorNoYesYesYes
Updatable FirmwareYesYesYesYes
Other Notable FeaturesN/AKVM switchTizen OSKVM Switch
Ambiglow RGB
Price (MSRP)$1,100$1,100$1,500$800
Warranty (in the US)3 years
(burn-in covered)
?3 years
(burn-in not covered)
3 years
(burn-in not covered)
*Limited to ~450-nits unless VRR is disabled
**HDR Game Mode reaches ~1000-nits but over-brightens the image, while True Black Mode is limited to ~450-nits and some scenes are too dark

The pricing and warranty can vary by region. Generally, we recommend going with the Dell AW3423DWF due to its price and warranty that covers burn-in.

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio
  • Decent peak brightness
  • Instantaneous response time
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 165Hz
  • Ergonomic design, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Risk of burn-in (not covered by warranty)
  • Peculiar subpixel layout causes very minor fringing on small text and fine details

About The Monitor

In case you want an even wider display, there’s the Samsung Odyssey OLED G9!

It’s available as G95SC with built-in Smart features and as G93SC without Smart features for ~$100 less.

Image Quality

The Samsung Odyssey OLED G9 also uses a QD-OLED panel, so you can expect the same excellent brightness (1000-nits HDR highlight peak, 250-nits peak for a 100% white window) and color gamut (99% DCI-P3) performance.

However, the OLED G9 uses a second-gen QD-OLED panel, which has a bit different subpixel layout. So, fringing on small text and fine details will be even less of an issue!

The 49″ 5120×1440 32:9 super-ultrawide screen is basically equivalent to two 27″ 2560×1440 displays side by side, just without the bezels in between them!

Note that the 5120×1440 resolution is quite demanding (almost as taxing as 4K UHD), so you’ll need a beefy GPU to maintain higher frame rates.

Naturally, the pixel response time speed is instantaneous and you get smooth VRR performance up to 240Hz.

Check out our full OLED G9 review for more details.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung Odyssey OLED G9 Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers up to 120mm height adjustment, -2°/15° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility. The screen has a moderate 1800R curvature for added immersion.

Connectivity options include DP 1.4 with DSC, HDMI 2.1, micro-HDMI 2.1, two 5W built-in speakers, a headphone jack, one upstream USB-C port and two downstream USB-C ports. The G95SC model also has WiFi and Bluetooth.

The Pros:

  • 2048-zone mini LED FALD
  • 1000-nits peak brightness
  • Wide color gamut
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 240Hz
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes

About The Monitor

If you’re too worried about burn-in and/or want a brighter display, there’s the Samsung Neo G95NA with a 49″ 5120×1440 240Hz mini LED panel!

Image Quality

The Samsung Neo G95NA has 2048 dimming zones for excellent backlight control, resulting in deep blacks, bright highlights and minimum blooming.

While the OLED G9 can reach 1000-nits for small highlights (< 3% screen size), the Neo G9 can maintain 1000-nits even for larger window sizes between 25% and 50%, and it can reach around 650-nits for a 100% white window (as opposed to 250-nits of QD-OLED panels).

So, even though they have the same peak brightness, the Neo G9 mini LED panel is significantly brighter overall. The main downside is that some blooming will be noticeable and you don’t get quite as vibrant colors with ~95% DCI-P3 coverage.

The Samsung G95NA also has a very fast response time speed for zero ghosting behind fast-moving objects and it supports VRR up to 240Hz to tear-free gameplay.

Check out our full G95NA review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung Odyssey Neo G9 Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is robust and versatile with up to 120mm height adjustment, -5°/15° tilt, +/- 15° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility, while the screen has an aggressive 1000R curvature for added immersion and a matte anti-glare coating against reflections.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports (limited to 144Hz), a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

The Pros:

  • 2392-zone mini LED FALD
  • 1300-nits peak brightness
  • Wide color gamut
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 240Hz
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub, KVM

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes
  • Expensive

About The Monitor

Want an even larger super-ultrawide display with FreeSync Premium Pro? The Samsung Odyssey Neo G95NC is for you!

Image Quality

While the 49″ 32:9 Neo G9 is equivalent to two 27″ 2560×1440 displays side by side, the 57″ G95NC is like having two 32″ 4K displays side by side, just without the bezels in between them!

This also means that you’ll need a high-end PC rig to utilize its high 7680×2160 resolution in modern games. In fact, the RTX 40-series GPUs don’t support the maximum resolution of this monitor – they’re limited to 120Hz at 7680×2160, whereas AMD’s 7000-series cards support 240Hz.

However, even with the RTX 4090, you won’t be able to get over 120FPS at 7680×2160 with decent picture settings in most games. So, you can think of this monitor as an investment for your future GPU upgrades.

The Neo G95NC boasts a stellar 1300-nit peak brightness for <10% white windows and up to 800-nits for full-field white. Its 2392 zones offer excellent backlight control with minor blooming in demanding scenes, you get a decent 95% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage, a quick response time speed and VRR support up to 240Hz.

Check out our full G95NC review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung Odyssey Neo G9 57 inch Model Design

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 120mm, -5°/12° tilt, +/- 15° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility. The screen has a steep 1000R curvature for added immersion.

Connectivity options include DP 2.1, three HDMI 2.1 ports, a headphone jack, two USB-A 3.0 ports and two USB-B ports for the integrated KVM functionality.

The Pros:

  • 1056-zone mini LED FALD
  • 1300-nits peak brightness
  • Wide color gamut
  • Plenty of features, including VRR up to 165Hz
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub, KVM

The Cons:

  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes
  • Expensive

About The Monitor

If you’re looking for something even more extravagant, check out the Samsung Odyssey Ark!

Image Quality

The Samsung Odyssey Ark has a 55″ 4K 165Hz panel with a steep 1000R screen curvature. What’s more, its design allows for use in both landscape and portrait mode for total immersion depending on the content you’re watching.

It has 1056 dimming zones, a high 1300-nit peak brightness, a decent 95% DCI-P3 color gamut, a fast response time speed and VRR support up to 165Hz.

You can check out our Ark G97NB review for more details. The model included in this guide and which we recommend is the newer G97NC variant.

It’s the same monitor as the G97NB, but it has a couple of extra features, including a KVM switch and a DisplayPort 1.4 input.

The monitor also has built-in Tizen OS with smart features, such as streaming apps, Microsoft 365, DeX, voice assistance and more.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung G97NC Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is robust and offers 188° pivot, up to 270mm height adjustment in the landscape position (and up to 30mm in portrait), +/- 10° tilt and 200x200mm VESA mount compatibility (or 300x300mm and 400x400mm via an extension kit).

Connectivity options on the monitor itself include a headphone jack, a USB-C input for a webcam and a port for the One Connect Box, which is an external device with other connectors.

The One Connect Box has DisplayPort 1.4, three HDMI ports, an Ethernet port, digital audio output, a USB hub (2 type A downstream, 2 type B upstream and 2 type C upstream) and the ‘ex-link’ port for service.

Bluetooth 5.2 and WiFi 5 are supported too, and the Samsung Odyssey Ark has integrated 2.2.2 channel speakers with 60W total for excellent audio quality and Dolby Atmos support. You also get a remote controller.

Conclusion

Did you find the FreeSync Premium Pro monitor for you?

If you’re still indecisive, leave us a comment and we’ll gladly help you out!

Overall, the AOC Q27G3XMN is an excellent display if you’re on a tight budget. If you can, we recommend investing in the Dell AW3423DWF or the Samsung OLED G9, depending on your preference.

Of course, if you’d rather have a higher resolution display or a mini LED super-ultrawide, those are great picks as well. You can’t go wrong!

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Rob Shafer

Rob is a software engineer with a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver. He now works full-time managing DisplayNinja while coding his own projects on the side.