The Best Thunderbolt 3 Monitors (2022 Reviews)

Looking for a monitor with Thunderbolt 3 or Thunderbolt 4? Check out the best models available, as well as everything else you need to know!

Got a powerful Thunderbolt 3 laptop or a PCIe card and want a monitor that will take full advantage of it? You’ve come to the right place!

In this guide, you’ll find the best Thunderbolt 3 and Thunderbolt 4 monitors currently available, as well as everything you need to know about them in order to ensure you’re getting the model that’s most suited for you!

MonitorSizeResolutionRefresh RatePanelPower DeliveryDaisy-chainSamsung C34J791
34”3440x1440100HzVA85WYes
32”3840x216060HzVA92WYes
27”3840x216060HzIPS100WYes
32”3840x216060HzIPS45WYes
38”3840x1600144HzIPS94WNo
40”5120x216075HzIPS96WYes
best value

Lenovo P27u-20

Lenovo P27u 20 Monitor
  • 27″ 4K IPS
  • Full Adobe RGB/DCI-P3 coverage
  • Thunderbolt 4
best overall

LG 38WN95C

lg 38wn95c monitor
  • 38″ 3840×1600 IPS
  • 98% DCI-P3
  • 144Hz & 1ms GtG
premium pick

LG 40WP95C

LG 40WP95C
  • 40″ 5120×2160 IPS
  • 98% DCI-P3
  • Thunderbolt 4

These are our best Thunderbolt 3 monitor picks. In the review summaries below, we’ll go over their most important features in detail.

We’ll also mention some other popular Thunderbolt 3 monitors and clarity why our picks are better. You’ll also find cheaper alternatives that use USB-C with DP Alt Mode and Power Delivery in case you don’t need some Thunderbolt 3 features.

Make sure you’re using a proper cable for the Thunderbolt 3 connection. Generic USB-C cables supplied with monitors or laptops often don’t support the full 40 Gbps transfer data, 100W power delivery and/or DisplayPort Alternate Mode.

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio
  • Good pixel density
  • Wide color gamut
  • FreeSync up to 100Hz
  • PiP/PbP

The Cons:

  • Minor ghosting, mainly in dark scenes
  • Not as wide viewing angles as that of IPS technology

About The Monitor

The Samsung CJ791 is one of the cheapest Thunderbolt 3 monitors available yet it’s a great pick for both gaming and work!

Image Quality

Based on a VA panel, the Samsung C34J791 boasts a high 3,000:1 static contrast ratio, which provides you with excellent detail visibility in dark scenes with deep blacks.

Further, it has a wide 125% sRGB color gamut size, resulting in vibrant colors. There’s no sRGB emulation mode, so if you need 100% sRGB color space without over-saturation, you’ll need to use AMD’s or NVIDIA’s gamut clamps or your own colorimeter and profile.

The viewing angles are also not as good as that of IPS technology, so the monitor is not recommended for professional color-critical work. However, you can do basic content creation and office-related work without any issues.

Moving on, the monitor’s ultrawide aspect ratio offers extra horizontal screen space that’s very useful when it comes to productivity work and audio/video editing. Compatible games and videos also provide a more immersive and cinematic viewing experience.

The 3440×1440 screen resolution is not very demanding to drive (at least in comparison to 4K UHD) and on a 34″ sized screen, you get a decent pixel density of 110 PPI (pixels per inch), resulting in crisp text and plenty of screen space.

With a peak brightness of 300-nits, the Samsung CJ791 is certainly not the brightest display, but it can get more than bright enough under normal lighting conditions.

Features

amd freesync logo

The Samsung C34J791 has a maximum refresh rate of 100Hz for a smooth gaming experience. Even scrolling or moving your cursor and windows around the desktop will feel more fluid.

Although most gaming monitors nowadays have at least 144Hz, 100Hz still provides you with a significant jump in motion clarity in comparison to 60Hz.

AMD FreeSync is also supported for tear-free gameplay up to 100FPS if you have a compatible AMD or NVIDIA GPU.

The main weakness of the CJ791 is the mediocre pixel response time speed, so you will be able to notice some trailing artifacts behind fast-moving objects.

However, it’s mainly noticeable in dark scenes and won’t bother most users; input lag performance, on the other hand, is top-notch, so you won’t be able to feel any delays between your actions and the result on the screen.

Other useful features include Picture in Picture and Picture by Picture, which allow you to display two PCs on the screen at once.

Note that the Samsung CJ791 uses PWM (Pulse-Width Modulation) to regulate brightness below 100% – this introduces flickering, but at a very high frequency (over 1000Hz), which shouldn’t bother most users sensitive to flicker.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung C34J791 Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers height adjustment up to 100mm, tilt by -20°/15° and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility. The screen has a matte anti-glare coating against reflections and a moderate 1500R curvature for added immersion.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.2, HDMI 2.0, Thunderbolt 3 input (with 85W PD), Thunderbolt 3 output (with 15W PD), a headphone jack, dual integrated speakers and two downstream USB 2.0 ports.

The Thunderbolt 3 output port is used to daisy-chain another display.

So, if you have a Thunderbolt 3 laptop, you can connect it to the Thunderbolt 3 input port of the monitor, which will charge it with 85W. If you have another display, you can simply connect it to the Thunderbolt 3 output of the CJ791 monitor.

Alternatives

If you don’t need the full Thunderbolt 3 bandwidth or features, you can save some money by going with the Philips 346E2CUAE. It offers similar image quality, performance and features, but it doesn’t have a Thunderbolt 3/USB-C output port for daisy chain and it has a lower 65W charging capacity.

In case you’re looking for an ultrawide Thunderbolt 3 monitor with an IPS panel, the following 34″ 3440×1440 models are available:

  • ASUS PA34VC – 100Hz, 100% sRGB, 60W PD (daisy chain port)
  • LG 34WL850 – 75Hz, 98% DCI-P3, 60W PD (no daisy chain port)

However, since these two models go for ~$1,000, we recommend the following 34″ 3440×1440 USB-C models instead.

You won’t find any budget 1080p or 1440p monitors with Thunderbolt 3. Instead, we recommend the ASUS PA247CV and the ASUS PA278CV with USB-C 65W PD and DisplayPort output ports for daisy-chaining. They also feature FreeSync, excellent factory calibration, a USB hub, ergonomic design and more.

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio
  • High pixel density
  • Wide color gamut
  • PiP/PbP

The Cons:

  • Minor ghosting, mainly in dark scenes
  • Not as wide viewing angles as that of IPS technology
  • Mediocre peak brightness

About The Monitor

Want a 32″ 4K monitor with Thunderbolt 3 that’s great for office-related work, everyday use, content consumption and basic content creation? The Samsung TU872 is for you!

Image Quality

Just like the Samsung CJ791, the F32TU87 uses a VA panel with a high 2,500:1 contrast ratio for deep blacks. The peak brightness is a bit lower at 250-nits, which is fine under normal lighting conditions, but if you’re in a particularly bright room without curtains/blinders, it might be too dim for you.

You also get a wide 92% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage for more rich and saturated colors, but there’s no sRGB emulation mode.

The 4K UHD resolution looks incredibly sharp even on 32″ sized screens with 140 PPI. Some users might prefer 125% scaling, some will opt for the native image (no scaling); either way, you get crystal-clear details and text with a lot of screen real estate.

Keep in mind that 4K UHD is quite demanding when it comes to gaming and video rendering, so make sure your PC will be able to handle it.

Features

The Samsung F32TU872 also supports HDR10, but due to its limited brightness and lack of local dimming, don’t expect a noteworthy HDR viewing experience.

Other, more useful features include PiP and PbP support.

Sadly, AMD FreeSync is not supported, while the specified 8ms GtG pixel response time speed is sufficient to keep up with the 60Hz refresh rate. Some ghosting will be noticeable in certain scenes, but it’s fine for casual gaming.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung F32TU872 Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is robust and versatile with up to 135mm height adjustment, 90° pivot, +/- 45° swivel, -7°/13° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options are abundant and include Thunderbolt 3 input (92W) and output (15W PD, daisy chain support), DisplayPort 1.2, HDMI 2.0, two downstream USB 3.0 ports, a headphone jack and an Ethernet port.

Alternatives

If you don’t need the full Thunderbolt 3 bandwidth and features, you can find a similar 32″ 4K VA monitor, the Samsung M7, with a USB-C port (65W PD) and integrated smart features for basically half the price.

The Pros:

  • Wide Adobe RGB and DCI-P3 gamut coverage, consistent colors with Delta < 1 factory calibration
  • High pixel density
  • High peak brightness
  • Built-in KVM function

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

Need a Thunderbolt 3 / 4 monitor with an IPS panel for color-critical work? You won’t find a better model than the Lenovo P27u-20 for the money.

Image Quality

Thanks to its IPS panel, the Lenovo ThinkVision P27u-20 delivers 178° wide viewing angles, ensuring that the colors are accurate and consistent regardless of the angle you’re looking at the screen.

It boasts an impressive color gamut with 99.1% DCI-P3, 99.5% Adobe RGB, 100% sRGB/Rec.709 and 83.7% Rec.2020 color space coverage. You also get dedicated color modes for each color space and professional-grade Delta E < 1 calibration out of the box!

The 4K UHD resolution looks even sharper on 27″ monitors with a high pixel density of 163 PPI. You will have to apply some scaling in order to make tiny text readable, resulting in a bit less screen real estate, but even crispier details.

Further, the Lenovo P27u-20 has an excellent peak brightness of 450-nits, so you can comfortably use it even in well-lit rooms. The main disadvantage of IPS technology is the mediocre contrast ratio of 1,000:1, so blacks won’t be quite as black as that of VA panels. There’s also IPS glow, which can be characterized as visible glowing around the corners of the screen, but it can be mitigated.

Features

The monitor also has VESA’s entry-level DisplayHDR 400 certification, but due to the limited contrast ratio and lack of local dimming, you’re not getting the true HDR viewing experience.

It’s also a decent monitor for gaming thanks to its low input lag and quick response time speed that prevents ghosting, but you’re limited to 60Hz without variable refresh rate technology.

There’s an integrated sensor that can automatically adjust the screen’s brightness according to ambient lighting.

Design & Connectivity

Lenovo P27u 20 Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers a good range of ergonomics, including up to 135mm height adjustment, -5°/35° tilt, +/- 45° swivel, +/- 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include Thunderbolt 4 input (96W PD), Thunderbolt 4 output (27W PD, daisy chain), DisplayPort 1.2, two HDMI 2.0 ports, an additional USB-C port with 27W PD, one upstream and three downstream USB 3.0 ports, an Ethernet port, a headphone jack and dual 3W integrated speakers.

The monitor also has an integrated KVM switch, allowing you to control two PCs connected to the screen via the same keyboard and mouse.

Alternatives

The Lenovo P27u-20 truly offers amazing value for the money, it’s actually better than some more expensive Thunderbolt 3 models with fewer features and not as good color gamut, such as the BenQ PD2725U.

The Dell UP2720Q is another excellent 27″ 4K monitor with Thunderbolt 3 and Adobe RGB color gamut. It even has a built-in colorimeter, but it’s almost $1,000 more expensive; for the fraction of that price difference, you can just get a high-quality colorimeter and calibrate the Lenovo P27u every few months for the basically same results.

You might also be interested in Apple’s Studio Display or LG’s 27″ 5K and 24″ 4K UltraFine models if you want even higher pixel density, but you’ll again be looking at spending almost $1,000 more than you would on the P27u-20, which we find excessive.

If you don’t need full Thunderbolt 3 features or a wide Adobe RGB color gamut, check out the Samsung S27A800U with USB-C 90W PD. For gaming, we recommend the Acer XV272UX 1440p 240Hz and the Acer XB283K KV 4K 144Hz models – both with USB-C 65W PD.

The Pros:

  • Wide Adobe RGB and DCI-P3 gamut coverage, consistent colors with Delta < 2 factory calibration
  • High pixel density
  • PiP/PbP, built-in KVM function

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)
  • Only 45W PD

About The Monitor

In case you want a 32″ 4K IPS Thunderbolt 3 monitor for color-critical work, Lenovo offers another excellent model.

Image Quality

The IPS panel of the monitor delivers a 1,000:1 contrast ratio, a 300-nit peak brightness, so it can’t get quite as bright as the 27″ sized model.

For most users, the 300-nit peak brightness will be more than enough and a lot of editors prefer the screen size and pixel density of 32″ 4K monitors.

It has a wide color gamut with 100% sRGB, 99.5% Adobe RGB and 98.2% DCI-P3 coverage with Delta E < 2 factory calibration and dedicated color modes available.

Other features include PiP/PbP and a built-in KVM switch.

Thanks to its quick response time speed and imperceptible input lag, the monitor is also suited for casual gaming though you are limited to a fixed 60Hz refresh rate.

Design & Connectivity

Lenovo P32u 10 Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is well-built and versatile with up to 110mm height adjustment, -5°/22° tilt, +/- 45° swivel, +/- 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include Thunderbolt 3 input (45W PD), Thunderbolt 3 output (15W PD, daisy chain), two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.2, one upstream and three downstream USB 3.0 ports and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

The Lenovo P32u-10 goes for $1,300, but you can often find it on sale for $700 – $800. Other 32″ 4K IPS Thunderbolt 3 monitors go for $1,200 – $1,300, so if you find a good deal on the P32u-10, it’s definitely the best value option.

The BenQ PD3220U offers Thunderbolt 3 with higher 85W PD and 15W output for daisy-chain, but it only covers 95% of the DCI-P3 color space and no proper Adobe RGB coverage for $1,200.

Lastly, there’s the LG 32UL950 with 98% DCI-P3 gamut coverage (again no proper Adobe RGB support) and Thunderbolt 3 output for daisy chain and input with 60W PD. It also has DisplayHDR 600, but with only a few dimming zones, the HDR picture is still subpar; it usually goes for $1,300.

So, unless you need stronger power delivery, the P32u-10 is the way to go even when it’s not on a big discount.

If you’re looking for a more affordable 32″ 4K IPS monitor and don’t need full Thunderbolt 3 features, check out the LG 32UP83A with a 95% DCI-P3 color gamut, FreeSync and USB-C with 60W PD for ~$550.

For gaming, we recommend the Acer XB323QK NV 32″ 4K 144Hz model with 90% DCI-P3 color gamut, HDMI 2.1 and USB-C with 65W PD.

There’s also the ASUS ProArt PA32UCG 32″ 4K 120Hz monitor with Thunderbolt 3, Adobe RGB color gamut, DisplayHDR 1400 and an 1152-zone mini LED backlight, but it goes for ~$5,000.

The Pros:

  • Wide DCI-P3 gamut coverage, consistent colors
  • Good pixel density
  • High peak brightness
  • PiP/PbP, built-in KVM function
  • FreeSync up to 144Hz

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

Looking for a better Thunderbolt 3 ultrawide monitor than the CJ791? The LG 38WN95C provides you with more accurate and rich colors, as well as a higher refresh rate and faster response time for gaming!

Image Quality

Based on LG’s Nano IPS panel, the LG 38WN95C has a wide 98% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage, but its Adobe RGB coverage falls short at ~85%. Still, you get vibrant colors, great factory calibration and an sRGB emulation mode.

It also has a strong peak brightness of 450-nits, which gets a boost up to 600-nits for HDR content. While it has a high peak brightness and a wide color gamut, its mediocre contrast ratio of 1,000:1 delivers an underwhelming HDR image quality.

There are 12 dimming zones that can improve the viewing experience a bit, but their effectiveness will vary from scene to scene.

The 38″ screen has a screen resolution of 3840×1600 pixels, so you get a high pixel density of 110 PPI (pixels per inch), resulting in plenty of screen space and sharp details without any scaling necessary.

Features

Thanks to its high 144Hz refresh rate and rapid 1ms GtG pixel response time speed, the gaming experience is buttery-smooth with no noticeable ghosting in fast-paced games, while FreeSync ensures there’s no screen tearing up to 144FPS.

You’ll also find LG’s standard feature set in the OSD menu, including Black Stabilizer (improves visibility in dark scenes), crosshair overlays, various picture presets and advanced image adjustment tools (four gamma presets, 6-axis hue/saturation, sharpness and color temperature fine-tuning).

There’s also an integrated sensor that can automatically adjust screen brightness according to ambient lighting.

Picture by Picture is available as well, and you can use LG’s Dual Controller application as a KVM switch for PCs connected to the same network.

Design & Connectivity

LG 38WN95C Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is robust and versatile with up to 100mm height adjustment, +/- 20° swivel, -3°/15° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility, while the screen has a subtle 2300R curvature for added immersion and a light matte anti-glare coating against reflections.

Connectivity options include Thunderbolt 3 with 94W PD, DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports limited to 75Hz, a headphone jack, two downstream USB 3.0 ports and dual 5W integrated speakers. There’s no Thunderbolt output for daisy-chaining.

The Pros:

  • Wide DCI-P3 gamut coverage, consistent colors
  • High pixel density
  • PiP/PbP, built-in KVM function
  • FreeSync up to 72Hz

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)
  • Expensive
  • Mediocre peak brightness

About The Monitor

In case you don’t care much about gaming and would rather have a better ultrawide monitor for office-related work and content creation, check out the LG 40WP95C!

Image Quality

In comparison to the LG 38WN95C, this monitor has a slightly larger 40″ screen backed by a significantly higher 5120×2160 screen resolution, resulting in a pixel density of 140 PPI – equivalent to that of a 32″ 4K display!

So, you get more screen real estate with sharper text and details; scaling is optional at this point as some users prefer 125% scaling and others none at all.

The color gamut is identical with 98% DCI-P3 coverage and a provided sRGB emulation mode. However, the 40WP95C doesn’t get nearly as bright with a 300-nit peak brightness and no local dimming support for HDR; the contrast ratio is the same at 1,000:1.

Features

The monitor supports AMD FreeSync with a 48-72Hz VRR range, so at least you get a small but noticeable boost in motion clarity in comparison to 60Hz models.

Other features include PiP/PbP, KVM function via Dual Controller, Black Stabilizer, brightness sensor and hardware calibration support.

Design & Connectivity

LG 40WP95C Monitor Design

The stand is sturdy and offers a good range of ergonomics, including up to 110mm height adjustment, +/- 15° swivel, -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility, while the screen has a subtle 2500R curvature and light matte anti-glare coating.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports limited to 30Hz at 5120×2160, Thunderbolt 4 input with 96W PD and output for daisy-chaining, a headphone jack, dual 10W integrated speakers and two downstream USB 3.0 ports.

Alternatives

LG also offers a 34″ 5120×2160 Thunderbolt 3 ultrawide monitor with an even higher pixel density and DisplayHDR 600, but it doesn’t have a flicker-free backlight and some units have image retention issues. Still, you might be interested in checking out the LG 34WK95U.

Lenovo, Dell and HP all offer models based on the same 40″ IPS panel as the 40WP95C. They offer basically identical image quality and similar performance, but different features; here’s a summary of the most important differences. Visit our full LG 40WP95C review for more information.

 LG 40WP95CLenovo P40W-20Dell U4021QWHP Z40C
Refresh Rate72Hz75Hz60Hz60Hz
FreeSyncYes (48-72Hz)N/AN/AN/A
Thunderbolt 41x Input 96W PD
1x Output (daisy-chain)
1x Input 96W PD
1x Output (daisy-chain)
N/AN/A
Thunderbolt 3N/AN/A1x Input 90W PD2x Input up to 100W
(165W PD total max)
Display Inputs1x DisplayPort 1.4
2x HDMI 2.0  
1x DisplayPort 1.4
1x HDMI 2.0

1x DisplayPort 1.4
2x HDMI 2.0
1x DisplayPort 1.4
1x HDMI 2.0
USB Ports2x USB-A4x USB-A
1x USB-B
1x USB-C (27W PD)
4x USB-A
1x USB-B
1x USB-C (15W PD)
4x USB-A
Other1x Headphone Jack
2x 10W Speakers
1x Headphone Jack
1x RJ45
1x Headphone Jack
1x RJ45
2x 9W Speakers
1x RJ45
2x 5W Speakers
1x Built-in Webcam
KVMLG Dual ControllerKVM Switch,
Lenovo eKVM7
KVM SwitchHP Device Bridge

Conclusion

Did you find the best Thunderbolt 3 monitor for you? Feel free to leave us a comment below if you need further help!

Overall, for both gaming and work, we recommend the LG 38WN95C, while the Samsung C34J791 and F32TU872 are decent cheaper alternatives if you’re not sensitive to ghosting and don’t need professional-grade color accuracy.

For color-critical work, the Lenovo P27u-20 and P32u-10 both offer excellent value for the money, but the LG 38WN95C is also worth considering here!

Finally, the LG 40WP95C offers a lot, but it’s also quite expensive, so we only recommend it if you can really put all of its features to good use.

Be sure to check out our best USB-C monitor buyer’s guide too. It only includes USB-C monitors that have DP Alt Mode and Power Delivery of at least 65W. We also have a dedicated USB-C monitor list where you can find all models available, and filter them by power delivery, resolution, refresh rate, etc.

Related Reads

Best 27 inch Monitors
The Best 27-Inch Monitors (2022 Reviews)
Rob Shafer

Rob is a software engineer with a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver. He now works full-time managing DisplayNinja while coding his own projects on the side.