The Best Monitors With Built-in KVM Switch (2023 Reviews)

Looking for a monitor with a built-in KVM switch? Check out the best models currently available and everything you need to know about them!

Are you often working with two PCs and would like to use a single set of keyboard and mouse for both computers on a single display?

Then a monitor with a built-in KVM switch is for you! Here are the best models available as well as all the information you need to know about them!

TypeMonitorSizeResolutionPanelRefresh Rate
Best 1080p Monitor27”1920x1080IPS165Hz
Best 1440p Monitors27”2560x1440IPS170Hz
27”2560x1440IPS240Hz
32”2560x1440IPS170Hz
27”2560x1440IPS60Hz
27”2560x1440IPS165Hz
Best 4K Monitors27”3840x2160IPS160Hz
28”3840x2160IPS144Hz
32”3840x2160IPS144Hz
Best UltraWide Monitors34”3440x1440IPS144Hz
40”5120x2160IPS60Hz
49”5120x1440IPS60Hz
49”5120x1440IPS144Hz
49”5120x1440VA120Hz
*60Hz USB-C
budget pick

Gigabyte M27Q-Pro

Gigabyte M27Q Pro
  • High pixel density
  • Accurate and vibrant colors
  • FreeSync up to 170Hz
best value

Gigabyte M34WQ

Gigabyte M34WQ
  • High pixel density, ultrawide format
  • Accurate and vibrant colors
  • FreeSync up to 144Hz
best overall

MSI MPG321UR-QF

MSI MPG321UR QD Monitor
  • High pixel density, 4K UHD
  • Accurate colors, Adobe RGB gamut
  • FreeSync up to 144Hz

Monitors with built-in KVM switches allow you to quickly and effortlessly swap between PCs you control with your keyboard and mouse.

Not only do these monitors bring more convenience and remove clutter, but they can also be a more cost-effective solution!

In the review summaries below, we’ll help you pick the model that’s most suited to your preferences and use case.

If you want to view our changelogs for this particular buying guide, you can do so at the end of this article.

Best 1080p Monitor

In case you just want the cheapest monitor with a built-in KVM switch, we recommend the following model.

The Pros:

  • Accurate colors
  • Plenty of features including VRR + MBR up to 165Hz
  • Height-adjustable stand

The Cons:

  • Low pixel density
  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The Gigabyte M27F A-SA is the cheapest monitor you can get with a KVM switch yet it offers an immersive and responsive gaming experience!

Image Quality

Based on an IPS panel with 99% sRGB color gamut, the monitor delivers consistent and accurate colors, while the 178° wide viewing angles ensure that the image won’t degrade in quality when viewed at skewed angles.

You also get a high peak brightness of 400-nits, so the screen can get bright enough to mitigate glare even in well-lit rooms.

The contrast ratio amounts to 1,000:1, as expected from IPS displays, meaning that you won’t get as deep blacks as that of VA panel displays, which usually have a contrast ratio of 3,000:1. However, VA monitors have other drawbacks and there aren’t any models with integrated KVM functionality at this price range anyway.

Now, the Full HD resolution is a bit low for the 27″ sized screen of the monitor as you get a mediocre pixel density of 81 PPI (pixels per inch). So, you won’t have particularly sharp details or a lot of screen real estate, but it will suffice for basic use and gaming or watching videos.

If you need a lot of screen space with crisp text, we recommend saving up for the 27″ 1440p model, which we’ll get into next.

Features

The Gigabyte M27F A supports VRR (variable refresh rate) with a 48-165Hz range for tear-free gameplay up to 165FPS. There’s also the Aim Stabilizer Sync technology, which uses backlight strobing at the same time as VRR in order to reduce perceived motion blur at a cost of picture brightness.

Next, the monitor has a rapid 1ms GtG pixel response time speed, so there won’t be any noticeable ghosting in fast-paced games.

You’ll also find plenty of useful features, such as Black Equalizer (improves visibility in dark scenes), OSD Sidekick (desktop application for On-Screen Display settings), Picture in Picture and Picture by Picture support, crosshair overlays, on-screen timers, a refresh rate tracker and Dashboard (tracks PC performance on-screen).

HDR is supported as well, but since the monitor doesn’t have a wide color gamut or other proper HDR hardware, you won’t get a noteworthy HDR image quality – as expected from a display at this price range.

Design & Connectivity

Gigabyte M27F A Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers height adjustment up to 130mm, tilt by -5°/20° and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.2, USB-C (DP 1.2 Alt Mode, 18W Power Delivery), a dual-USB 3.0 hub (2 downstream + 1 upstream), a headphone jack, dual 3W integrated speakers and a KVM switch.

Alternatives

You might also come across the previous model, the Gigabyte M27F. It has a wider 95% DCI-P3 color gamut for more saturated colors, but a lower 300-nit peak brightness, a slower pixel response time speed and no built-in speakers.

If you’d rather have a smaller monitor, we recommend the ASUS XG259CM 1080p 240Hz IPS display for gamers and the BenQ PD2506Q 1440p IPS screen for work.

There’s also the Dell U2422HE, but we find that it’s too expensive for a 24″ 1080p 60Hz display.

Best 1440p Monitors

If you’re buying a monitor with an integrated KVM switch, the 2560×1440 resolution models offer excellent value for the price!

The Pros:

  • High pixel density
  • Accurate and vibrant colors
  • Plenty of features including FreeSync and MBR up to 170Hz
  • Height-adjustable stand

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The Gigabyte M27Q PRO (or M27Q-P) is the cheapest 1440p monitor with a built-in KVM switch you can get yet it offers an exceptional gaming experience with a rapid pixel response time speed and a high 170Hz refresh rate. Moreover, it’s based on an IPS panel with accurate and vibrant colors as well as wide viewing angles.

In fact – at around $300, the M27Q-P is cheaper than KVM monitors with 1920×1080 60Hz or 2560×1440 60Hz screens, such as the Dell U2422HE (~$400) or the Dell U2722DE (~$550). So, even if you don’t need the gaming features of the M27Q-P, it still offers better value for money!

Image Quality

The 1440p resolution hits the pixel density sweet spot on 27″ sized screens. With roughly 108 PPI (pixels per inch), you get sharp details and plenty of screen space without having to use any scaling.

Further, if you intend on gaming, 1440p is significantly less demanding to drive than 4K UHD, allowing you to maintain higher frame rates.

The Gigabyte M27Q-P also has amazing colors with 98% DCI-P3 gamut coverage, equivalent to ~135% sRGB gamut size.

A gamut clamp is also available in case you want to restrict the color output to 100% sRGB for better accuracy when editing/watching sRGB content.

You also get a very good peak brightness of 400-nits, so the screen can get more than bright enough even in well-lit rooms.

The IPS panel of the monitor provides 178° wide viewing angles, ensuring that the image remains perfect regardless of the angle you’re looking at the screen; brightness, contrast, gamma and colors are consistent, which along with the wide gamut support allows you to use the display for color-critical work.

Some IPS glow is preset, which is an expected drawback of this technology and you get a static contrast ratio of 1,000:1, so blacks won’t be as deep as that of VA panels with a ~3,000:1 contrast ratio, but VA monitors have their own disadvantages.

Unlike the previous M27Q variant, the M27Q-P has a regular RGB subpixel layout, so you won’t have any issues with text clarity!

You can check out our full M27Q-P review for more information.

Features

amd freesync logo

Moving on, the monitor supports AMD FreeSync, which allows for a variable refresh rate (VRR) resulting in tear-free gameplay up to 170FPS. You can also use VRR with compatible NVIDIA GPUs (GTX 10-series or newer) over DisplayPort.

Motion Blur Reduction is available as well; it uses backlight strobing to reduce perceived motion blur at the cost of image brightness and it can be active at the same time as VRR on this monitor!

Other features include Black Equalizer (improves visibility in dark scenes by altering the gamma curvature), PiP/PbP, crosshair overlays and ‘Dashboard’ that allows you to track system performance (GPU/CPU temperature, utilization, etc.) on the screen.

Design & Connectivity

Gigabyte M27Q PRO Design

The stand is quite sturdy and offers height adjustment up to 130mm as well as tilt by -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.4, USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode and 18W PD), a headphone jack, a dual-USB 3.0 hub, two 3W integrated speakers and a built-in KVM switch.

The Pros:

  • High pixel density
  • Accurate and vibrant colors
  • Plenty of features including FreeSync and MBR up to 240Hz
  • Height-adjustable stand

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

If you want an even higher refresh rate, the Gigabyte M27Q-X model is for you.

Image Quality

The M27Q-X is actually the best value 1440p 240Hz gaming monitor available; other 1440p 240Hz monitors go for around $700 yet they don’t even feature KVM support!

The extra 70Hz doesn’t offer quite as a noticeable boost in motion clarity as opposed to going from 60Hz to 120Hz+, but if you can run games at such high frame rates, your gaming experience will be smoother and more enjoyable.

In terms of image quality, you get the same viewing experience with a 1,000:1 contrast ratio, a specified 350-nit peak brightness (goes up to 450-nits in real use) and a wide ~97% Adobe RGB color gamut with an sRGB mode available.

Aim Stabilizer Sync is available as well, allowing for simultaneous VRR and MBR performance.

Check out our Gigabyte M27Q-X review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Gigabyte M27Q X Monitor Design

The stand is identical to the M27Q-P model with height adjustment up to 130mm, tilt by -5°/20° and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.4, USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode and 18W PD), a headphone jack, a dual-USB 3.0 hub, two 2W built-in speakers and a built-in KVM switch. PiP and PbP are supported too.

The Pros:

  • Accurate and vibrant colors
  • Plenty of features including FreeSync + MBR up to 170Hz
  • Ergonomic stand

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The Gigabyte M32Q is the best 32″ 1440p monitor with a built-in KVM switch.

Image Quality

The M32Q has a lower pixel density of 92 PPI (pixels per inch) than the M27Q-P and M27Q-X, so the details overall won’t be as sharp – you get the same viewing experience as with a 24″ 1080p monitor, but on a bigger 32″ sized screen and with a bit more screen real estate!

The M32Q has wide color gamut support with 94% DCI-P3 coverage (~120% sRGB) and a provided sRGB mode. Other panel-related specifications are similar to the M27Q models and include a 1,000:1 contrast ratio, wide 178° viewing angles and a 400-nit peak brightness with basic HDR10 support.

Thanks to the rapid 1ms GtG pixel response time speed and 165Hz (170Hz OC) refresh rate, there’s no ghosting behind fast-moving objects, ensuring a smooth fast-paced gaming experience.

Additionally, the monitor supports VRR up to 170Hz as well as Gigabyte’s Aim Stabilizer Sync technology that allows VRR and MBR to be used simultaneously.

Other features include Dashboard, Black Equalizer, PiP/PbP and various picture presets. Check out our full M32Q review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Gigabyte M32Q Design

The stand of the M32Q is robust and versatile with up to 130mm height adjustment, +/- 30° swivel, -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.2, two HDMI 2.0 ports, a headphone jack, a USB 3.0 hub (1 upstream + 3 downstream), USB-C (DP 1.2 Alt Mode, 15W PD) and a built-in KVM siwtch.

Alternatives

If you’d rather have a higher contrast ratio and curved screen, check out the Gigabyte M32QC with a VA panel and KVM switch. However, it doesn’t have as smooth VRR performance or as fast pixel response time speed.

The Pros:

  • High pixel density
  • Professional-grade color accuracy and Adobe RGB gamut coverage
  • Fully ergonomic stand, USB-C with 65W PD, DP-out for daisy-chaining

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

While both the M27Q and M32Q monitors can be used for basic color-critical work, if you need full coverage of the Adobe RGB color space as well as professional-grade factory calibration, you should get the ViewSonic VP2785-2K.

Image Quality

The ViewSonic VP2785-2K has 100% Adobe RGB, 100% sRGB and 96% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage, and it comes factory calibrated at Delta E < 2. Further, it supports 14-bit 3D LUT, hardware calibration and uniformity correction.

You’ll also find dedicated picture presets for Adobe RGB, sRGB, EBU, DCI-P3, SMPTE-C, Rec709, DICOM SIM and D50 color modes as well as three custom calibration profiles.

Additionally, there are various customizable picture modes for different scenarios (Video Editing, Animation, CAD/CAM, Photography, etc.) – all of which allow you to fine-tune gamma, sharpness and other settings. There are also ambient light and presence sensors on the monitor; PiP/PbP modes are supported as well.

Design & Connectivity

ViewSonic VP2785 2K Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is robust and versatile with up to 130mm height adjustment, +/- 60° swivel, -5°/21° tilt, 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options are abundant and include HDMI 1.4, DisplayPort 1.2, DisplayPort-out for daisy-chaining, USB-C (DP 1.2 Alt Mode, 65W PD), a USB 3.0 hub (1 upstream + 3 downstream) and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

  • ViewSonic VP2785-4K – 4K version of the monitor with the same features, though it’s more than twice the price
  • ViewSonic VP2771 – the best professional monitor with KVM if you just need the sRGB color gamut; it also has USB-C with 60W PD, DP-Out, etc.

The Pros:

  • High pixel density
  • Accurate and vibrant colors
  • Plenty of features including VRR and MBR up to 160Hz
  • Fully ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options, including USB-C with 90W PD

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)
  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes with local dimming

About The Monitor

If you want a KVM gaming monitor that also offers amazing HDR image quality, the Cooler Master Tempest GP27Q offers unbeatable value for the price.

Image Quality

To start with, this 27″ 1440p 165Hz gaming monitor has an IPS panel with a quick 1ms GtG pixel response time speed and an exceptional color gamut, covering 99% Adobe RGB and 98% DCI-P3 color space with Delta E < 2 factory calibration.

These specs, along with the built-in KVM switch and USB-C port with Power Delivery, make the GP27Q worth its $500 asking price yet it also features a 576-zone mini LED FALD (full-array local dimming backlight) for true HDR image quality!

The monitor can reach over 1,200-nits peak brightness and has 576 individually controllable zones that can dim parts of the image that are supposed to be dark for a significantly higher contrast ratio.

On top of that, it supports VRR and MBR up to 165Hz and has standard gaming features, such as Black Stabilization, crosshair overlays, on-screen timers, etc.

Be sure to check out our full GP27Q review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Cooler Master Tempest GP27Q Design

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 110mm, 90° pivot, +/- 15° swivel, -5°/15° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports (max 144Hz), a USB-C port with DP 1.4 Alt Mode and 90W PD, dual 3W built-in speakers, a headphone jack and integrated KVM functionality.

Best 4K Monitors

Next up, we have the best 4K monitors with integrated KVM switches!

The Pros:

  • High pixel density, 4K UHD
  • Accurate and vibrant colors
  • Plenty of features including VRR up to 160Hz
  • Fully ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options, including USB-C with 90W PD

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)
  • Minor blooming/haloing noticeable in certain scenes with local dimming

About The Monitor

The Cooler Master Tempest GP27U is the 4K version of the above-mentioned GP27Q. It has a slightly lower 160Hz maximum refresh rate and no MBR support, but other specifications are identical. It’s $300 more expensive though.

While 4K UHD looks sharper on 27″ sized screens than 1440p, you will have to use scaling to make small text readable and it’s a lot more taxing on the GPU.

Further, the difference in sharpness is mostly noticeable when it comes to text and photo/video editing. In games and videos, it’s not that visible.

Therefore, we recommend the GP27U only if you need a display for work too or have a high-end PC rig that won’t struggle with frame rates at 4K UHD.

You can check out our full Cooler Master Tempest GP27U review for more information.

The Pros:

  • High pixel density, 4K UHD
  • Accurate and vibrant colors
  • Plenty of features including FreeSync + MBR up to 144Hz
  • Height-adjustable stand

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

In case you don’t need HDR or can’t afford the GP27U, but want 4K UHD resolution, the Gigabyte M28U is an excellent display.

It offers amazing value as a 4K 144Hz gaming monitor, but it’s also great for other use and its KVM switch is just the icing on the cake!

Image Quality

Based on a 28″ IPS panel, this 4K UHD monitor offers a high pixel density of 157 PPI (pixels per inch), allowing for crystal-clear details and plenty of screen real estate.

Further, the M28U has a wide 94% DCI-P3 color gamut (with a provided sRGB mode) for saturated and rich colors, while HDR content gets a boost up to 400-nits from the standard 300-nits.

HDR is supported and there are 8 dimming zones, but you’re still just getting a glimpse of HDR, so it’s not really a ‘true’ HDR monitor – such monitors are naturally much more expensive.

The Gigabyte M28U has a rapid 1ms GtG response time speed for zero ghosting in fast-paced games and it supports Aim Stabilizer Sync for simultaneous VRR and MBR performance.

Other supported features include PiP/PbP, Dashboard, Black Equalizer, crosshair overlays and various picture presets.

Check out our Gigabyte M28U review for more details.

Design & Connectivity

Gigabyte M28U Monitor Design

Just like all Gigabyte’s monitors mentioned so far, the design is the same and includes a sturdy stand with basic ergonomics (height adjustment up to 130mm, tilt by -5°/20° and VESA mount compatibility).

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.1 ports (with 24 Gbps and DSC), DisplayPort 1.4, USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode, 15W PD), a headphone jack, a USB 3.0 hub (1 upstream + 3 downstream) and dual 3W integrated speakers.

Alternatives

If you don’t need a high refresh rate, but would rather have professional-grade color accuracy and/or USB-C with 90W Power Delivery, check out the Dell U2723QE with an IPS Black panel (2000:1 contrast ratio).

The Pros:

  • High pixel density, 4K UHD
  • Accurate and vibrant colors
  • DisplayHDR 600, Adobe RGB gamut
  • Plenty of features including FreeSync + MBR up to 144Hz
  • Ergonomic stand

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

If you want a 32″ 4K monitor with a KVM switch, look no further than the MSI MPG321UR-QD!

Image Quality

4K UHD resolution looks incredibly sharp even on 32″ sized screens, so with roughly 140 PPI, you get plenty of screen real estate and crisp details. At this pixel density, scaling is optional as some users go with the native 100%, while others prefer 125%.

The MSI MPG321UR-QD also has an impressive color gamut of 100% Adobe RGB, and it features dedicated DCI-P3 and sRGB emulation modes.

On top of that, it has VESA’s DisplayHDR 600 certification meaning that HDR content gets a boost in peak brightness up to 600-nits and there are 16 dimming zones that can improve the contrast ratio and dynamic range in scenes where dark and bright objects are far apart.

Features

The monitor is equipped with plenty of additional features, such as MPRT-Sync (allows for simultaneous or separate MBR and VRR performance), crosshair overlays, an ambient light sensor, PiP/PbP, various picture presets and Night Vision (improves visibility in dark scenes).

Design & Connectivity

MSI MPG321UR QD Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is quite sturdy and offers a good range of ergonomics, including up to 100mm height adjustment, -5°/20° tilt, +/- 30° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports, USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode, 18W PD), three audio jacks (headphone, microphone and combo), six USB-A 2.0 ports, three USB-B 2.0 ports and an integrated KVM switch.

Alternatives

If you’re looking for something a bit cheaper, check out the Gigabyte M32U. It doesn’t have as many USB ports or as wide color gamut, but it’s ~$100 cheaper. It’s the 32″ version of the previously-mentioned Gigabyte M28U.

There’s also the Gigabyte M32UC with a curved VA panel in case you prefer higher contrast ratio to fast response time and wide viewing angles.

Don’t need a high refresh rate? Check out the Dell U3223QE with USB-C (90W PD) and an IPS Black panel with professional-grade factory calibration or the BenQ PD3220U with Thunderbolt 3.

In case you want a larger 43″ 4K monitor, consider the Gigabyte FV43U with 144Hz and DisplayHDR 1000. However, due to its BGR subpixel layout and an issue when displaying gray text on dark backgrounds on the top of the screen, we can only recommend it as a monitor mainly for gaming and content consumption. It’s not ideal for work and office-related use due to subpar text clarity. Some users might find it acceptable with proper ClearType and scaling settings though.

Best UltraWide Monitors

Ultrawide monitors provide you with extra horizontal screen space, resulting in a wider field of view for a more cinematic viewing experience. They’re also very useful for audio/video editing and productivity/spreadsheet type of work.

The Pros:

  • High pixel density, ultrawide format
  • Accurate and vibrant colors
  • Plenty of features including FreeSync + MBR up to 144Hz
  • Ergonomic stand

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

Here we have yet another Gigabyte model. In fact, Gigabyte was the first monitor manufacturer to start adding built-in KVM switches to most of their line-up, and other companies followed suit.

Image Quality

The Gigabyte M34WQ is a 34″ 3440×1440 IPS flat-screen ultrawide monitor with wide viewing angles, quick response time and wide color gamut.

It’s basically equivalent to a 27″ 2560×1440 monitor that’s just ~33% wider. So, you keep the height and the pixel density of a 27″ 1440p display and get added horizontal screen space.

Most video games support the 21:9 aspect ratio natively and even a lot of older games can be patched or modded for the ultrawide format. Movies shot at the ~21:9 aspect ratio are also displayed on the monitor without black borders at the top and bottom of the screen.

Moving on, the M34WQ has a wide 91% DCI-P3 color gamut (with a provided sRGB mode), a 1,000:1 contrast ratio and a peak brightness of 400-nits with the basic DisplayHDR 400 support.

The main disadvantage of the monitor is that it has a flat screen rather than a curved one which most users prefer on ultrawide displays. However, at a certain viewing distance (at least 2.5ft or ~80cm), this becomes almost negligible.

Features

Aim Stabilizer Sync is supported (VRR + MBR at the same time or separately) up to 144Hz. Other features include PiP/PbP, Dashboard, Black Equalizer, various picture presets, crosshair overlays and advanced image adjustment tools, such as gamma, sharpness, color vibrance and 6-axis hue/saturation.

Design & Connectivity

Gigabyte M34WQ Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers height adjustment up to 130mm, tilt by -5°/21°, +/- 30° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports (max 100Hz), USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode, 18W PD), a headphone jack, a dual-USB 3.0 hub, dual 3W integrated speakers and a built-in KVM switch.

Alternatives

If you want a curved ultrawide monitor with a built-in KVM switch and a high refresh rate, there is the Philips 346B1C with a VA panel. We only recommend it if you can find it around its $480 MSRP.

You can also find a 3440×1440 high refresh rate KVM ultrawide monitor with a 1900R curved IPS panel, the ASUS XG349C. It’s overclockable to 180Hz and has a wider 98% DCI-P3 color gamut, but it’s almost double the price of the M34WQ.

In case you’d rather have a USB-C port with Power Delivery than a high refresh rate, consider the LG 34WQ73A with 90W PD and KVM switch.

The Pros:

  • High pixel density
  • Accurate and vibrant colors
  • Delta < 2 factory calibration
  • Ergonomic stand, USB-C with 90W PD

The Cons:

  • Expensive
  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

Want something even better in the ultrawide form factor? Check out the Dell U4021QW!

Image Quality

This 40″ ultrawide display with a screen resolution of 5120×2160 is essentially equivalent to a 32″ 4K UHD monitor that’s 33% wider!

Further, it uses an IPS panel with a wide 98% DCI-P3 color gamut and a provided sRGB emulation mode with Delta E < 2 factory calibration.

The Dell U4021QW has a peak brightness of 300-nits, a 1,000:1 contrast ratio, 178° wide viewing angles and a subtle screen curvature of 2500R.

It’s limited to 60Hz and doesn’t support a variable refresh rate, but thanks to its vibrant colors, high resolution, ultrawide format and quick response time, video games will look great and run smoothly, though you’ll have to resort to V-Sync if you’re bothered by screen tearing.

The monitor supports Uniformity Compensation and PiP/PbP.

Design & Connectivity

Dell U4021WQ Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is robust and offers up to 120mm height adjustment, +/- 35° swivel, -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports (max 30Hz at 5120×2160), four downstream USB 3.0 ports, one upstream USB-B port, one downstream USB-C port, Thunderbolt 3 with 90W PD, a headphone jack, RJ45 and KVM.

Alternatives

If you’re looking for something a bit cheaper, check out the Dell U3821DW 38″ 3840×1600 ultrawide monitor with built-in KVM.

The Pros:

  • High pixel density
  • Accurate colors
  • Delta < 2 factory calibration
  • Ergonomic stand, USB-C with 90W PD

The Cons:

  • Expensive
  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

Need even more screen space? Consider a super-ultrawide monitor with a 32:9 aspect ratio! The Dell U4919DW is the best option if you just need 60Hz and the standard sRGB color space coverage.

Image Quality

A 49″ 5120×1440 32:9 ultrawide monitor is basically equivalent to two 27″ 2560×1440 displays side by side, just without the bezels in-between them.

The Dell U4919DW uses an IPS panel with the basic sRGB gamut coverage for accurate colors (Delta < 2 factory calibration), while other specs include a 1,000:1 contrast ratio and a peak brightness of 350-nits.

It supports PbP and Uniformity Compensation, but it lacks FreeSync support and it’s limited to 60Hz.

In truth, buying this monitor mainly for the KVM switch isn’t worth it unless your main use case is audio/video editing to take advantage of all the horizontal screen space. Otherwise, you can buy two 27″ 1440p monitors for $1,000 less and get the same amount of screen real estate.

Design & Connectivity

dell ultrasharp u4919dw monitor

The Dell U4919DW has premium design quality with up to 90mm height adjustment, -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility. The screen has a subtle 3800R curvature for added immersion without distorting the image.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.4, two upstream USB 3.0 ports, five downstream USB 3.0 ports and USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode and 90W PD).

The Pros:

  • High pixel density
  • Wide color gamut
  • Plenty of features including VRR up to 144Hz
  • Ergonomic stand, USB-C with 90W PD

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

While the Dell U4919DW is an excellent display, the LG 49WQ95C offers a higher refresh rate and a wider color gamut for a more responsive gaming experience and more immersive content consumption.

The best part is that, when it’s on sale, it’s actually cheaper than the Dell U4919DW.

Image Quality

The LG 49WQ95C has a wide 98% DCI-P3 color gamut (~135% sRGB gamut size) for rich and saturated colors. It also has the option to clamp its gamut down to ~100% sRGB for better accuracy when viewing SDR content.

Other specs include a 1,000:1 contrast ratio, a 400-nit peak brightness and DisplayHDR 400 support.

Variable refresh rate is supported for flawless tear-free gameplay up to 144FPS with both AMD FreeSync Premium Pro and G-SYNC Compatible certifications.

Be sure to check out our full LG 49WQ95C review for more details.

Design & Connectivity

LG 49WQ95C Review

The stand of the monitor is robust and offers height adjustment up to 110mm, -5°/20° tilt and +/- 15° swivel, while the screen has a subtle 3800R curvature and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.1 ports, DP 1.4 with DSC, USB-C with DP 1.4 Alt Mode and 90W PD, a dual-USB 3.0 hub, a headphone jack, dual 10W integrated speakers and an integrated KVM functionality.

The Pros:

  • High contrast ratio and pixel density
  • Wide color gamut
  • Plenty of features
  • Ergonomic stand and rich connectivity options, including RJ45 and USB-C (90W PD)

The Cons:

  • Moderate ghosting in darker scenes in fast-paced games
  • USB-C limited to 60Hz

About The Monitor

If you don’t need an IPS panel for color-critical work, but would like a 49″ super-ultrawide display, the Samsung S49A950 is for you!

Image Quality

Based on a VA panel with a 3,000:1 contrast ratio, the Samsung S95UA delivers deep blacks, while its peak brightness of 400-nits allows it to get more than bright enough even in well-lit rooms.

Further, it has a wide 95% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage for vibrant colors.

Its VA panel is a bit slower when it comes to pixel response time, so some ghosting will be noticeable in fast-paced games, mainly in darker scenes. Unless you’re particularly sensitive to it, this won’t be an issue for most gamers.

Design & Connectivity

Samsung S49A950 Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers height adjustment up to 120mm, tilt by -4°/17°, swivel by +/- 15° and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 inputs, USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode, 90W PD), a headphone jack, three downstream USB 3.0 ports, RJ45, built-in speakers and an integrated KVM switch.

Note that USB-C is limited to 60Hz on this monitor.

Alternatives

In case you want a super-ultrawide gaming monitor with a KVM switch that supports a high refresh rate over its USB-C port, but can’t find the LG 49WQ95C on sale, we recommend the AOC AG493UCX2.

It’s a 5120×1440 165Hz display with KVM and USB-C (65W Power Delivery, DP Alt Mode), and its USB-C port is limited to 120Hz.

Conclusion

These are the best monitors with built-in KVM switches currently available! Did you find the best model for you? Feel free to leave us a comment below if you need help picking the monitor that’s most suited for you!

All in all, the Gigabyte M27Q-P, M27Q-X, M32Q, M28U and M34WQ all offer excellent value for money regardless of whether you’re looking for a gaming model or one for regular use.

For photo editing, the ViewSonic VP2785-2K is our recommendation if you need Adobe RGB color gamut coverage; otherwise, check out the alternatives we mentioned for it with different color gamuts.

If you can afford something a bit pricier, we recommend the MSI MPG321UR-QD since it has excellent performance and image quality as well as plenty of features.

In case you want an immersive HDR image quality, you can’t go wrong with the Cooler Master Tempest GP27Q – or the GP27U model if you want 4K resolution.

Didn’t find what you’re looking for? We also have a dedicated list of all KVM monitors!

Updates +

  • January 2, 2023:
    – Added the ASUS XG349C as an alternative for the Gigabyte M34WQ.
  • December 14, 2022:
    – Added the LG 49WQ95C and the AOC AG493UCX2 as an alternative to the Samsung S95UA.
  • December 1, 2022:
    – Added review summaries for the Tempest GP27Q and GP27U.
  • November 22, 2022:
    – Checked up on the guide to ensure that our picks are still the best options available.
  • October 13, 2022:
    – Added the Gigabyte M27F-A.
  • October 12, 2022:
    – Added the Gigabyte M32QC, the Gigabyte M32UC and the LG 34WQ73A as alternatives for the M32Q, the MSI MPG321UR-QD and the Gigabyte M34WQ, respectively.
    – Replaced the Gigabyte M27Q with the M27Q-P (Pro).
    – Added the Gigabyte M27F-A to the table. A dedicated review section will be added soon.
  • May 8, 2022:
    – Added the Samsung S95UA.
  • April 20, 2022:
    – Added the Gigabyte M27Q-X.

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Rob Shafer

Rob is a software engineer with a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver. He now works full-time managing DisplayNinja while coding his own projects on the side.