The Best Monitors For Photo And Video Editing (2022 Reviews)

Looking for the best monitor for photo and video editing? Check out the best monitors currently available and all you need to know before buying one.

Are you looking for a professional monitor for photography, graphic design, animation, CAD/CAM and similar purposes?

In this buying guide, you’ll find the best and most cost-efficient monitors for all of the professions mentioned above.

We’ve included only the best models with different resolutions, screen sizes and color gamuts, so you can effortlessly choose the perfect monitor for photo editing and video editing according to your needs.

TypeMonitorSizeResolutionColor Gamut 
Best Entry-Level Monitors For Photo Editing24”1920x1200100% sRGB
27”2560x1440100% sRGB
27”3840x2160100% sRGB
Best Mid-Range Monitors For Photo Editing24”1920x120099% Adobe RGB
27”3840x216099% Adobe RGB
32”3840x2160100% Adobe RGB
Best High-End Monitors For Photo Editing32”3840x216099.8% DCI-P3
32”3840x216099.5% Adobe RGB
32”3840x216099% Adobe RGB
Best Monitors For Video Editing29”2560x108099% sRGB
34”3440x144099% sRGB
34”3440x144098% DCI-P3
34”5120x216098% DCI-P3
38”3840x160095% DCI-P3
40”5120x216098% DCI-P3
49”5120x144099% sRGB
budget pick

ASUS PA248QV

asus proart pa248qv
  • Affordable
  • sRGB color gamut
best overall

Acer CM3271K

Acer CM3271K Monitor
  • 4K UHD
  • Adobe RGB color gamut
premium pick

Lenovo P32u-10

Lenovo P32u 10 Monitor
  • 4K UHD
  • Adobe RGB color gamut
  • Thunderbolt 3, KVM

All monitors in this list feature IPS panels for the best color accuracy and consistency as well as the widest viewing angles.

Furthermore, all monitors are flicker-free (*except for the ASUS PA278QV) and have an integrated low blue light filter, so you can work for hours without straining your eyes.

You can also view our changelogs for this buying guide at the end of this article.

Best Entry-Level Monitors For Photo Editing

Are you just starting out or just need a monitor with the standard sRGB color gamut? The following monitors will ensure that you get as precise and consistent colors as you can within this price range.

The Pros:

  • Unbeatable value for the price
  • Factory-calibrated at Delta E < 2
  • Plenty of features
  • FreeSync up to 75Hz for gaming
  • Fully ergonomic design with rich connectivity options

The Cons:

  • Not true 8-bit color depth

About The Monitor

The ASUS PA248QV is the best 24″ IPS monitor for PhotoShop and similar entry-level color-critical tasks.

Image Quality

Unlike most 24″ IPS monitors with 16:9 aspect ratio and 1920×1080 resolution, the ASUS ProArt PA248QV features the 1920×1200 resolution with a 16:10 aspect ratio. This provides you with a bit of extra vertical screen space as the screen is taller than a regular 24″ 16:9 monitor, while the pixel density is the same.

Additionally, the monitor covers the full sRGB color space and thanks to its IPS panel, the colors will remain accurate and consistent regardless of the angle you’re looking at the screen.

Want to know the best part? It’s factory-calibrated at Delta E < 2, so it’s ready for work straight out of the box!

Other panel-relation specifications are standard for an IPS panel display at this price range, including a 300-nit peak brightness and a contrast ratio of 1,000:1.

Keep in mind that, like all 1080p IPS displays, the ASUS PA248QV uses dithering (6-bit + 2-bit FRC) to achieve 8-bit color depth for 16.7 million colors.

Features

amd freesync logo

This monitor is also great if you want to do some gaming on the side.

It supports AMD FreeSync, which allows you to synchronize the monitor’s refresh rate with GPU’s frame rate for tear-free gameplay between 48 and 75FPS. The higher 75Hz refresh rate also provides you with a small but noticeable boost in motion clarity in video games as opposed to the standard 60Hz displays.

Further, it has a fast 5ms GtG pixel response time speed, so there won’t be any prominent trailing visible behind fast-moving objects in games.

Finally, the monitor offers advanced 6-axis color adjustments, as well as five gamma presets ranging from gamma 1.8 to gamma 2.6.

For more information, you can visit our full ASUS PA248QV review.

Design & Connectivity

asus pa248qv back

The design is robust and sleek with thin bezels and versatile ergonomics including up to 130mm height adjustment, +/- 90° swivel, 90° pivot, -5°/35° tilt and 100 x 100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Moving on, connectivity options are rich as well and include HDMI 1.4, DisplayPort 1.2, VGA, a headphone jack and a quad-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

All in all, you can’t go wrong with the ASUS PA248QV; its color accuracy and premium features are worth much more than the asking price.

Alternatively, you might be interested in the ViewSonic VP2468, which has more connectivity options (mini-DisplayPort and DisplayPort-Out) and supports 14-bit 3D LUT, but it’s a bit more expensive.

The Pros:

  • Excellent value for the price
  • Plenty of screen space and vivid details
  • Fully ergonomic design with rich connectivity options
  • Plenty of exclusive features

The Cons:

  • Uses PWM to regulate brightness, but at a high 1000Hz+ frequency

About The Monitor

In case you want 1440p instead of 1080p, the ASUS PA278QV is the first monitor you should consider.

Image Quality

The ASUS PA278QV is basically the 27″ 1440p version of the PA248QV mentioned above. You get a bigger screen and a higher resolution, as well as a higher pixel-per-inch ratio.

So, besides having more screen real estate, you’ll also get better detail clarity. Furthermore, the PA278QV supports 8-bit color depth natively, without the use of dithering.

Other panel-related specifications are similar and include a 350-nit peak brightness, a 1,000:1 contrast ratio, 100% sRGB/Rec.709 color gamut and Delta E < 2 factory-calibration.

Features

The monitor supports AMD FreeSync up to 75Hz (48-75Hz VRR range) in case you want to enjoy some tear-free gameplay when not working.

You also get access to advanced image adjustment tools (gamma and 6-axis).

Note that the monitor uses PWM (Pulse-Width Modulation) to regulate brightness, but at a very high 1000Hz+ frequency, which shouldn’t bother those sensitive to flickering.

Visit our ASUS PA278QV review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

asus pa278qv monitor back

The ASUS PA278QV has a fully ergonomic design with up to 150mm height adjustment, 90° pivot, +/- 95° swivel, -5°/35° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount pattern.

Connectivity includes HDMI 1.4, DisplayPort 1.2, mini-DisplayPort 1.2, Dual-Link DVI-D, a quad-USB 3.0 hub, a headphone jack and two 2W built-in speakers.

Alternatives

The ASUS PA278QV is the most cost-efficient 1440p monitor for color-critical work. If you’re worried about the PWM flicker, check out the ViewSonic VP2768 PRO and the BenQ PD2700Q.

The Pros:

  • Fully ergonomic design with rich connectivity options, including USB-C with 90W PD and RJ45
  • Factory-calibrated at Delta E < 2

The Cons:

  • Expensive

About The Monitor

Looking for the best 4K monitor for photo editing? The ViewSonic VP2768a-4K is the most affordable yet and one of the most popular and most reliable 4K monitors for color-critical work.

Image Quality

The good news? The ViewSonic VP2768a-4K monitor covers 100% of the sRGB color space and it’s factory-calibrated at Delta E < 2, ensuring accurate colors out of the box. Other panel-related specs include a 350-nit peak brightness, a 1,300:1 static contrast ratio and dithered 10-bit color depth.

As if that’s not enough, the 4K UHD resolution provides an incredibly rich pixel density on 27″ sized screens meaning that you will have to scale the image for optimal use.

Note that some applications don’t scale well, leaving you with too tiny or too big user interface, so make sure to double-check how your editing software handles scaling.

While 32″ 4K IPS monitors require less scaling (125% – 150%), they are significantly more expensive. The 32″ sized variant of this monitor, for instance, the VP3268a-4K goes for ~$900 — at which point you could get a 27″ 4K model with a wider color gamut instead.

Luckily, most applications scale perfectly fine nowadays, so there’s nothing to worry about unless you’re using legacy software.

Features

Best of all, even though it’s one of the most affordable professional 4K monitors, the VP2768a supports 14-bit 3D LUT hardware calibration — unlike the competing models.

It also has a Screen Uniformity feature that improves brightness and color uniformity, though at a cost of contrast ratio.

You’ll also find advanced image adjustment tools in the OSD (On-Screen Display) menu of the monitor, along with various color space modes, such as sRGB, EBU, SMPTE-C, Rec.709 and DICOM-SIM.

Design & Connectivity

ViewSonic VP2768a 4K Monitor Design

The design of the ViewSonic VP2768a-4K boasts a sturdy build, an adjustable stand and ultra-thin bezels at all four sides of the display!

You can elevate the screen by up to 130mm, pivot by +/- 90°, swivel by +/- 60 °, tilt by -5°/21° and VESA mount it (100x100mm).

Connectivity includes two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.2, USB-C with DP 1.2 Alt Mode and 90W PD, two downstream USB 3.0 ports, RJ45 and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

Even if you don’t need USB-C, the VP2768a-4K is the most cost-effective 4K monitor with professional-grade factory calibration.

However, if you can’t afford it, consider getting a regular 27″ 4K IPS monitor for ~$300, such as the Dell S2721QS or the LG 27UL500, and pair it with a ~$170 colorimeter, such as the Datacolor SpyderX, for similar results after calibration and profiling.

Another excellent 27″ 4K monitor for photo/video editing is the Dell U2723QE though it’s more expensive due to its premium features, including USB-C with 90W PD, KVM, 98% DCI-P3 wide color gamut coverage and an IPS Black panel with a 2,000:1 contrast ratio. It’s also available as a 32″ variant, the U3223QE.

Best Mid-Range Monitors For Photo Editing

In this category, you will find the best monitors with the Adobe RGB color gamut.

The Pros:

  • Excellent value for the price
  • Wide Adobe RGB color gamut
  • Factory-calibrated at Delta E ≤ 2
  • Plenty of exclusive features
  • Fully ergonomic stand with rich connectivity options

The Cons:

  • None

About The Monitor

In case your work requires a wide color coverage of the Adobe RGB color space, the BenQ SW240 is the best budget monitor for photo editing you can possibly obtain.

Image Quality

color gamut

The BenQ SW240 features a 1920×1200 screen resolution with a 16:10 aspect ratio which will, as opposed to the standard 1080p displays, provide you with extra vertical screen space.

And the good news? It’s factory-calibrated at Delta E ≤ 2 and covers 100% sRGB, 99% Adobe RGB and 95% DCI-P3 color spaces. Other panel-related specs include a 250-nit peak brightness, a 1,000:1 static contrast ratio and 10-bit color depth via dithering as well as 14-bit 3D LUT.

You can also read our full review of the BenQ SW240.

Features

In addition to advanced picture and color settings, the monitor offers its exclusive Palette Master Element software for calibration.

Here’s the deal: you can save custom calibrations or use the pre-calibrated presets for sRGB, Adobe RGB, Rec.709 and DCI-P3 color spaces as well as the Black & White mode. Using the hotkey on the monitor, you can quickly swap between up to three of the selected presets/color modes.

Design & Connectivity

benq sw240 monitor back

The BenQ SW240 Adobe RGB monitor offers versatile ergonomics including up to 140mm height adjustment, -5°/20° tilt, +/- 45° swivel, 90° pivot and VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity includes DVI, HDMI 1.4, DisplayPort, an SD card reader, a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub. You can also purchase a shading hood for this monitor on Amazon.

The Pros:

  • Wide color gamut
  • Shading hood
  • Fully ergonomic design and rich connectivity options
  • Factory-calibrated at Delta E < 2

The Cons:

  • USB-C has only 15W PD

About The Monitor

The Acer CM3271K from the CM3 series (hence the confusing model name) offers incredible value for the price! In fact, it’s even cheaper than many 1440p Adobe RGB displays, allowing you to enjoy the perks of both 4K resolution and wide color gamut at a reasonable price.

Image Quality

Simply put, the combination of the wide 99% Adobe RGB color gamut (100% sRGB, 90% DCI-P3, 75% Rec.2020) and 4K UHD resolution makes the CM3271K the dream monitor of many designers and colorists due to the stunning detail clarity, as well as color vibrancy and accuracy.

It even supports HDR (High Dynamic Range), but with the entry-level DisplayHDR 400 certification, so you shouldn’t expect a ‘true’ HDR viewing experience.

The peak brightness does get a slight boost to 400-nits from the typical 350-nits for HDR content, which along with the monitor’s gorgeous colors can make the HDR picture a bit better than SDR, depending on the content/scene.

Features

In the OSD menu, you can effortlessly swap between different color spaces (sRGB, DCI-P3, SMPTE-C, etc.) and picture modes (including two custom calibration profiles).

Naturally, you’ll find plenty of image adjustment tools there as well, including gamma and 6-axis hue/saturation.

AMD FreeSync is supported as well for tear-free gameplay up to 60FPS.

Design & Connectivity

Acer CM3271K Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor has a premium feel to it and offers a good range of ergonomics, including up to 180mm height adjustment, -5°/35° tilt, 360° swivel, 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility. You also get a shading hood with the monitor!

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.2, USB-C (DP 1.2 Alt Mode, 15W PD), a USB 3.0 hub (1 upstream + 4 downstream), a headphone jack and dual 24 integrated speakers.

Alternatives

If the Acer CM3271K is not available, check out the Lenovo P27u-20.

BenQ’s 1440p and 4K Adobe RGB models, such as the SW270C and SW271C are considerably more expensive, and you can actually find a 32″ 4K Adobe RGB monitor at that price range, which we’ll get into next.

The Pros:

  • Factory-calibrated at Delta E < 2
  • Wide Adobe RGB and DCI-P3 color gamut
  • Full ergonomic support with rich connectivity options including Thunderbolt 3 and KVM

The Cons:

  • None

About The Monitor

The Lenovo P32u-10 is the best 32″ 4K Adobe RGB monitor for photo editing for under $1,000 in case you want a larger display than the 27″ sized Acer CM3271K.

Image Quality

If you need a better monitor than the Acer CM3271K, we recommend investing in the Lenovo P32u-10. Not only does it feature a larger screen, but it also has better coverage of the DCI-P3 (98.2%) and Rec.2020 color spaces.

The Lenovo P32u-10 is factory-calibrated at Delta E < 2, has a peak brightness of 300-nits, and it offers plenty of useful features including various color presets (sRGB, Rec. 709, Adobe RGB, DCI-P3, Rec. 2020, etc.) and advanced image adjustment tools.

You’ll also find Picture in Picture and Picture by Picture modes.

Design & Connectivity

Lenovo P32u 10 Monitor Design

The Lenovo P32u-10 boasts extensive connectivity options with two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.2, Thunderbolt 3 input (DP 1.2 Alt Mode and 45W PD), Thunderbolt 3 output for daisy-chaining, three downstream USB 3.0 ports, a headphone jack and KVM functionality.

It has a versatile stand with up to 110mm height adjustment, +/- 90° pivot, +/- 45° swivel, -5°/22° tilt and VESA mount compatibility.

Best High-End Monitors For Photo Editing

Here, you’ll find the absolute best monitors for photo and video editing.

The Pros:

  • Exceptional HDR image quality thanks to the mini-LED FALD backlight and 1000-nit peak brightness
  • Consistent and accurate colors
  • Fully ergonomic design and extensive connectivity options including Thunderbolt 3
  • Plenty of additional features

The Cons:

  • Expensive

About The Monitor

If you’re serious about HDR video editing, you’ll need a monitor that’s capable of displaying HDR content properly, and you won’t find anything better than the Dell UltraSharp UP3221Q for the price.

Image Quality

So, what makes HDR content appear so great on the Dell UP3221Q?

To start with, it has a backlight with over 2,000 mini LED full-array local dimming zones. These zones can dim parts of the picture that need to be dark, without affecting the parts of the screen that should remain bright.

In turn, the contrast ratio is increased up to 1,000,000:1, which in addition to the monitor’s stellar 1000-nit peak brightness, 4K resolution and wide color gamut support, makes for an incredible HDR viewing experience.

Even the previous generation ‘best’ consumer HDR editing monitor, the PA32UC, has only 384 dimming zones, while the 2021 model, the PA32UCX, has a better 1152 mini-LED FALD system, but still inferior to that of the Dell UP3221Q, which goes for around the same price.

As the monitor is primarily intended for video editing, its color gamut leans towards the DCI-P3 color space with 99.8% gamut coverage. Other gamut coverages include 93% Adobe RGB, 83% Rec. 2020 and 100% sRGB.

But here’s the kicker: the Dell UP3221Q has a built-in colorimeter!

Design & Connectivity

Dell UP3221Q Monitor Back

The design of the monitor offers full ergonomic support with up to 160mm height adjustment, -5°/21° tilt, +/- 30° swivel, 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options are abundant and include two HDMI 2.0b ports, DisplayPort 1.4, two Thunderbolt 3 ports (one upstream with 90W PD and DP 1.4 Alt Mode, one downstream for MST daisy-chaining), a headphone jack, a dual-USB 3.0 hub and an extra USB port for an external colorimeter.

The Pros:

  • Exceptional HDR image quality thanks to the mini-LED FALD backlight and 1600-nit peak brightness
  • Consistent and accurate colors
  • Fully ergonomic design and extensive connectivity options including Thunderbolt 3
  • Plenty of additional features

The Cons:

  • Expensive

About The Monitor

Looking for a monitor that’s great for photo/video editing, HDR content consumption/creation and responsive gaming? You’ll love the ASUS PA32UCG!

Image Quality

In comparison to the Dell UP3221Q, the mini LED backlight of the ASUS PA32UCG has fewer dimming zones (1152), but it has a higher 1600-nit peak brightness, a wider Adobe RGB color gamut coverage and a faster 120Hz refresh rate, making it ideal for game developers and those who want to use the monitor for both gaming and work.

It even supports AMD FreeSync Premium Pro and HDMI 2.1 VRR for tear-free gameplay up to 120FPS.

Other features include HDR support (HDR10, HLG and Dolby Vision), advanced image adjustment tools (gamma, 6-axis hue/saturation, ProArt hardware calibration) and various picture/color presets (sRGB, DCI-P3, Rec. 2020, DICOM, Rec. 709, numerous HDR modes and two customizable profiles).

Design & Connectivity

ASUS PA32UCG Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is robust and ergonomic with up to 130mm height adjustment, -5°/23° tilt, +/- 60° swivel, 90° pivot and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options are abundant and include two Thunderbolt 3 ports (one input with 60W PD, one output for daisy-chaining), DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, HDMI 2.1, two HDMI 2.0 ports, three downstream USB 3.0 ports, a headphone jack and two 3W built-in speakers.

The Pros:

  • Exceptional HDR image quality thanks to the infinite contrast ratio
  • Consistent and accurate colors
  • Ergonomic design and extensive connectivity options including USB-C with 90W PD
  • Plenty of additional features

The Cons:

  • Expensive
  • Risk of image burn-in
  • Peak brightness lower than that of LED LCDs

About The Monitor

The LG UltraFine 32EP950 is the first OLED monitor available for professional use!

Image Quality

Thanks to its OLED panel, each pixel is self-emissive, meaning that you get true blacks and an infinite contrast ratio for breath-taking image quality. Moreover, there’s no IPS/VA glow, backlight bleeding, haloing/blooming or any other visual artifacts that could take away from the viewing experience.

Color gamut and accuracy is also impressive with 99% coverage of both DCI-P3 and Adobe RGB color spaces with an available sRGB emulation mode. Viewing angles are also flawless as the image remains perfect regardless of the angle you’re looking at the screen.

Further, OLEDs also have instantaneous pixel response time speed for a blur-free fast-paced gaming experience, but the 32EP950 is sadly limited to 60Hz with no VRR support.

The main downside is the lower peak brightness in comparison to displays with LED or mini LED backlighting. For SDR, it goes up to 250-nits whereas for HDR, it can reach up to 540-nits.

Another issue is the risk of permanent image burn-in and temporary image retention. However, the LG 32EP950 has many built-in features to prevent this and if you use the screen appropriately (avoid leaving images with static elements on the screen for too long), it shouldn’t be a problem.

Design & Connectivity

LG 32EP950 Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 130mm, 90° pivot, tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two DisplayPort 1.4 inputs, HDMI 2.0, USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode, 90W PD), a headphone jack and a USB 3.0 hub (one upstream, three downstream).

Alternatives

  • LG 27EP950 – 27″ version of this monitor
  • LG OLED42C2 – a 42″ OLED TV. However, it has a much lower 100% white window brightness and more aggressive ABL
  • Dell AW3423DW – a 34″ 3440×1440 QD-OLED monitor

Best UltraWide Monitors For Video Editing

While all monitors in this buyer’s guide would work just fine for video editing, the following ultrawide displays offer extra horizontal screen space, which is perfect for video and audio editing.

The Pros:

  • Factory-calibrated for 99% sRGB
  • Excellent value for the price
  • Plenty of features
  • HDR10 support

The Cons:

  • Not true 8-bit color depth
  • Tilt-only design
  • No USB ports
  • HDR is software-emulated only

About The Monitor

If you are looking for the cheapest ultrawide monitor that’s actually good for video editing, the LG 29WP60G won’t disappoint you.

Image Quality

Due to its affordable price, the LG 29WP60G is not just great for video editing, it’s also great for everyday multimedia use, including gaming.

Now, the monitor does not have as accurate and rich colors as the previously mentioned monitors, but for the price, the colors are more than fine.

In fact, the LG 29WP60G is factory-calibrated and covers 99% of the sRGB color gamut though it supports 8-bit depth via dithering. Moreover, it supports HDR, but with a peak luminance of 300-nits, a contrast ratio of 1,000:1 and only the standard sRGB color gamut, HDR is just software-emulated.

Keep in mind that a 29″ 21:9 ultrawide monitor is as tall as a regular 23″ 16:9 monitor, just wider — which may take some time getting used to.

Additionally, the 2560×1080 resolution on a 29″ screen provides a pixel density of 95 PPI which is similar to 1080p on a 24″ screen (91 PPI).

Features

Moving on, the LG 29WP60G offers numerous useful features including On-Screen Control which allows you to adjust the OSD (On-Screen Display) settings in a desktop application.

Next, Screen Split allows you to split the screen in different layouts for easier multi-tasking.

There are also plenty of gaming features available including Crosshair, FreeSync (40-75Hz range), Dynamic Action Sync and Black Stabilizer.

Design & Connectivity

LG 29WP60G B Monitor Design

The LG 29WP60G computer monitor for video editing has a tilt-only design, but you can VESA mount it using the 100x100mm pattern.

Connectivity options include HDMI 2.0, DisplayPort 1.2, USB-C (DP 1.2 Alt Mode) and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

If you are looking for an affordable ultrawide monitor for video editing, watching movies and gaming, the LG 29WP60G is definitely for you.

On Amazon, you will also be able to find the 34″ version of this monitor, but we don’t recommend it since it also features the 2560×1080 resolution which on its 34″ screen results in a low pixel density.

The Pros:

  • Plenty of features
  • Rich pixel density, no scaling necessary
  • Height-adjustable stand

The Cons:

  • Design lacks swivel option

About The Monitor

In case you want a 34″ ultrawide monitor, we highly recommend the LG 34WL750.

Image Quality

Thanks to the UWQHD resolution of 3440×1440 pixels, the LG 34WL750 hits the pixel density sweet spot of 110 pixels per inch. This means that you get plenty of screen real estate with vivid details without any scaling necessary.

But it gets better: the monitor is factory-calibrated, covers ~99% of the sRGB color space and supports 10-bit color depth via dithering.

Features

The LG 34WL750 also features advanced color and picture adjustment tools, including 6-axis hue/saturation, four gamma presets and manual color temperature fine-tuning.

Additionally, the monitor supports AMD FreeSync over DisplayPort and HDMI with a 40-60Hz dynamic refresh rate range.

Design & Connectivity

LG 34WL750 Monitor Back

Besides tilting the screen by -5°/20°, you can elevate it up to 120mm and VESA mount it using the 100x100mm pattern. Connectivity includes two HDMI 2.0 ports, a DisplayPort 1.4 input and a headphone jack.

The Pros:

  • Plenty of features
  • Wide color gamut
  • Rich pixel density, no scaling necessary
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub, USB-C with 65W PD

The Cons:

  • Expensive

About The Monitor

Want a 34″ 3440×1440 IPS ultrawide monitor but with a DCI-P3 color gamut? BenQ has you covered with their PD3420Q model.

Image Quality

The BenQ PD3420Q covers 98% DCI-P3 color gamut and offers optimized color modes for sRGB and Rec.709 color spaces, making it ideal for video editors and designers who need an accurate representation of all color gamuts involved.

It has a strong 350-nit peak brightness (400-nits for HDR), a 1,000:1 contrast ratio, 10-bit color depth support via dithering and 178° wide viewing angles.

Sadly, it’s limited to 60Hz and doesn’t support a variable refresh rate, so it’s not particularly great for gaming. However, thanks to its high resolution, ultrawide format, wide color gamut and fast response time, games will still look great.

Other useful features include dedicated picture presets for CAD/CAM, Animation and Darkroom, as well as PiP/PbP support, DualView (allows you to view two different color spaces side by side) and Uniformity Technology (improves screen uniformity at a cost of contrast ratio).

Design & Connectivity

BenQ PD3420Q Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and you can adjust its height by up to 150mm, tilt it by -5°/20°, swivel by +/- 30° or VESA mount the screen via the 100x100mm pattern.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.4, USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode, 65W PD), a USB 3.0 hub (three downstream + one upstream), a headphone jack and dual 2.5W integrated speakers. There’s also an integrated KVM switch.

It also comes with the ‘hotkey puck’ device which you can use to remotely access the OSD settings and swap between different presets.

The Pros:

  • Plenty of features
  • Wide color gamut
  • High pixel density
  • Ergonomic stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • Expensive

About The Monitor

If you want to combine high resolution with the ultrawide format, the MSI Prestige PS341WU is for you!

Image Quality

With its 5120×2160 (often referred to as 5K2K or 2160p ultrawide) resolution, the 34″ MSI PS341WU provides you with a high pixel density of 163 PPI, which is equivalent to that of a 27″ 4K monitor!

So, you will have to use some scaling in order to make small text readable, but as a result, you’ll get even sharper text and higher detail clarity.

The monitor has a wide 98% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage and features an sRGB emulation mode. Further, it has a high 450-nit peak brightness for SDR content, and 600-nits for HDR.

There are 12 dimming zones, so you get a noticeable boost in HDR image quality in comparison to the HDR-400 monitors, but due to the low 1,200:1 native contrast ratio, only some HDR scenes will get a meaningful improvement.

Gamers will be disappointed that there’s no variable refresh rate support and that the maximum refresh rate is 60Hz, but considering how demanding the resolution is, most users won’t be using the MSI PS341WU for gaming anyway.

Design & Connectivity

MSI PS341WU Monitor Design

The stand offers height adjustment up to 100m, tilt by -5°/20°, swivel by +/- 35° and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode), two HDMI 2.0 ports (limited to 4K UHD), three downstream and one upstream USB 3.0 ports, a microphone jack, a headphone jack and an audio combo jack.

Keep in mind that you can also get the Dell AW3423DW QD-OLED ultrawide gaming monitor at this price range, which has a 95% Adobe RGB and 99.3% DCI-P3 gamut coverage and an infinite contrast ratio.

The Pros:

  • 14-bit 3D LUT, factory-calibrated at Delta E less than 2
  • Plenty of exclusive features
  • Adjustable design with rich connectivity options, including KVM, RJ45, USB-C with 90W PD
  • Rich pixel density

The Cons:

  • Expensive

About The Monitor

Want the best 38″ ultrawide monitor for video editing? Look no further than the ViewSonic VP3881a.

Image Quality

The ViewSonic VP3881a is the best 38″ ultrawide monitor for editing; there are other 38″ models by LG and Acer, but ViewSonic’s is the best when it comes to value/price.

First of all, the monitor is factory-calibrated at Delta E < 2 and covers 95% of the DCI-P3 color space with dedicated sRGB and Rec. 709 presets.

Moreover, it has 14-bit 3D LUT and supports hardware calibration,

But to top it all off, the gigantic 38″ screen features a resolution of 3840×1600 pixels, which will provide you with the perfect pixel density of 110 PPI. So, you get plenty of workspace for editing as well as sharp and clear details.

Features

Moving on, the ViewSonic VP3881a ultrawide monitor supports HDR as well, but due to the 300-nit peak brightness and a contrast ratio of 1,000:1, the HDR content won’t look much better.

Further, the monitor is equipped with plenty of useful features, including advanced 6-axis color adjustments, the PiP and PbP modes, Dual Color, gamma presets and many more. There are also several color space presets available such as sRGB, EBU, SMPTE-C, Rec.709, DICOM-SIM, three calibration profiles and a custom mode.

Moreover, the ViewMode feature provides you with optimized and customizable profiles for Designer (CAD/CAM, Animation, Video Edit) and Photographer (Photo, Landscape, Portrait, Monochrome) profiles.

Design & Connectivity

ViewSonic VP3881a Monitor Design

The ViewSonic VP3881a boasts rich connectivity options with DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 sockets, a USB-C port (which can be used for KVM, DP Alt Mode, and 90W PD), two downstream and one upstream USB 3.0 ports, a headphone jack and two 5W built-in speakers.

You can also elevate the screen up to 130mm, swivel it to the left and right by -/+ 60°, tilt it by -1°/21° or VESA mount it via the 100 x 100mm pattern. The screen has a 2300R curvature which perfectly suits the large 38″ screen.

The Pros:

  • Factory-calibrated at Delta E < 2
  • Plenty of exclusive features
  • Adjustable design with extensive connectivity options
  • High pixel density
  • Wide color gamut

The Cons:

  • Expensive

About The Monitor

If you want an even larger ultrawide monitor, the Dell U4021QW is the best you can find in the 21:9 form factor.

Image Quality

Just like the MSI PS341WU, the Dell U4021QW has the 5120×2160 screen resolution, but since it has a larger screen, you get a bit lower pixel density of 140 PPI. It’s basically identical to a 32″ 4K monitor that’s ~33% wider.

It has a wide 98% DCI-P3 color gamut coverage, an sRGB emulation mode is available and you get excellent Delta E < 2 factory calibration.

Other panel-related specifications include a 300-nit peak brightness, a 1,000:1 contrast ratio, 178° wide viewing angles and 10-bit color depth support.

Design & Connectivity

Dell U4021WQ Monitor Design

The screen has a subtle 2500R curvature and it’s VESA mount compatible via the 100x100mm pattern, while the stand offers height adjustment up to 120mm, +/- 35° swivel and -5°/20° tilt.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports (limited to 30Hz at 5120×2160 or 60Hz at 4K UHD), a quad-USB 3.0 hub, two USB-C ports (one with Thunderbolt 3 and 90W PD), a headphone jack, an Ethernet port and a built-in KVM switch.

Alternatives

LG, Lenovo and HP offer their models based on the same panel with a bit different features and connectivity options. So, you can pick the one based on your personal preference and availability/pricing.

 LG 40WP95CLenovo P40W-20Dell U4021QWHP Z40C
Refresh Rate72Hz75Hz60Hz60Hz
FreeSyncYes (48-72Hz)N/AN/AN/A
Thunderbolt 41x Input 96W PD
1x Output (daisy-chain)
1x Input 96W PD
1x Output (daisy-chain)
N/AN/A
Thunderbolt 3N/AN/A1x Input 90W PD2x Input up to 100W
(165W PD total max)
Display Inputs1x DisplayPort 1.4
2x HDMI 2.0  
1x DisplayPort 1.4
1x HDMI 2.0

1x DisplayPort 1.4
2x HDMI 2.0
1x DisplayPort 1.4
1x HDMI 2.0
USB Ports2x USB-A4x USB-A
1x USB-B
1x USB-C (27W PD)
4x USB-A
1x USB-B
1x USB-C (15W PD)
4x USB-A
Other1x Headphone Jack
2x 10W Speakers
1x Headphone Jack
1x RJ45
1x Headphone Jack
1x RJ45
2x 9W Speakers
1x RJ45
2x 5W Speakers
1x Built-in Webcam
KVMLG Dual ControllerKVM Switch,
Lenovo eKVM7
KVM SwitchHP Device Bridge

The Pros:

  • Factory-calibrated at Delta E less than 2
  • Plenty of features
  • Adjustable design with rich connectivity options
  • Rich pixel density

The Cons:

  • None

About The Monitor

With the 32:9 ‘super’ ultra-wide aspect ratio, you get an even wider preview of your timelines and more screen space for productivity work.

Image Quality

The Dell U4919DW sports a 49″ screen with a 5120×1440 screen resolution.

Think about it: that’s equivalent to two 27″ 1440p monitors put side by side, but without the bezels in-between!

Moreover, you get accurate and consistent colors covering 99% of the sRGB color space with Delta E < 2 factory-calibration. Other specifications include a 350-nit peak brightness, a 1,000:1 static contrast ratio, 5ms response time, 178° viewing angles and 10-bit color depth support.

Features

Noteworthy features include Picture by Picture support, advanced picture adjustment tools and Uniformity Compensation, which can improve uniformity at a cost of image brightness and contrast.

Unfortunately, there’s no AMD FreeSync support, and the monitor is limited to 60Hz.

Design & Connectivity

dell ultrasharp u4919dw monitor

The Dell UltraSharp U4919DW boasts premium build quality and decent ergonomics with up to 90mm height adjustment, -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options are abundant and include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.4, two upstream USB 3.0 ports (can be used as KVM Switch), five downstream USB 3.0 ports and a USB-C port (with DP 1.4 Alt Mode and 90W PD).

Summary

If you want a super-ultrawide monitor for photo/video editing, the Dell U4919DW is the way to go. LG’s also has a model based on the same panel, the LG 49WL95C, but it doesn’t have as good factory-calibration. It does support FreeSync up to 75Hz though.

Conclusion

Have you picked the best monitor for photo editing and video editing for your work? If not, leave us a comment and we’ll be glad to help.

Overall, if you are just starting out with editing, the ASUS PA248QV and the PA278QV models will provide you with everything you need at an affordable price.

Then, according to your budget and needs, you can get either a higher resolution or a wider color gamut display — or both, in which case we recommend the Acer CM3271K or the Lenovo P32u-10.

In case you want to tackle HDR content editing/consumption, the Dell UP3221Q is the way to go.

Finally, for video editing, an ultrawide display is a life-saver, so pick one according to your budget.

Updates +

  • May 8, 2022:
    – Replaced the ASUS PA329C with the Lenovo P32u-10.
  • February 22, 2022:
    – Replaced the ViewSonic VP3881 with VP3881a and the VP2768-4K with VP2768a-4K.
  • December 9, 2021:
    – Added review summaries for the monitors that were missing them.
  • November 24, 2021:
    – Checked up on the guide to ensure that our picks are still the best options available.
  • August 5, 2021:
    – Replaced the LG 34UM88C (no longer available) with the LG 34WL750.
    – Added the ASUS PA32UCG, the BenQ PD3420Q, and the Dell U4021WQ to the table. Dedicated review sections will be added soon.
  • May 5, 2021:
    – Made the guide easier to read for new visitors.
  • February 26, 2021:
    – Replaced the BenQ PD2700Q with the ASUS PA278QV.
    – Replaced the Dell U2718Q with the ViewSonic VP2768-4K PRO.
    – Added the Acer CM3271K.
    – Removed the BenQ PD3200U, the BenQ SW2700PT, and the BenQ SW271.
    – Replaced the ASUS PA329Q with the ASUS PA329C.
    – Replaced the ASUS PA32UC with the Dell UP3221Q.
    – Added the BenQ PD3420Q as a wide gamut alternative to the LG 34UM88C.
    – Added the Dell U4021QW as a wide gamut alternative to the ViewSonic VP3881.

Related Reads

Best UltraWide Monitors
The Best UltraWide Monitors (2022 Reviews)
Joseph Moore

Joseph has probably spent thousands of hours learning about displays in his free time and prior work experience at HP. He now writes and manages DisplayNinja to ensure it stays as the people's favorite resource.