Gigabyte G27Q Review: 1440p 144Hz IPS FreeSync Gaming Monitor

The Gigabyte G27Q is a 27" 1440p 144Hz IPS gaming monitor with DisplayHDR 400, FreeSync, and an affordable price tag!

Bottom Line

The Gigabyte G27Q is an affordable 27″ 1440p 144Hz IPS gaming monitor with a wide color gamut, fast pixel response time, and smooth VRR performance!

Design:
(4.0)
Display:
(4.8)
Performance:
(4.7)
Price/Value:
(4.7)
4.6

The Gigabyte G27Q offers a combination of specifications that’s favorite among many PC gamers: 27″, 1440p, 144Hz, and IPS – plus, it does so at an affordable ~$300 price tag.

There’s a lot of similar gaming monitors at this price range though, so here’s how it compares to the competition.

Image Quality

Based on an IPS panel, the Gigabyte G27Q monitor delivers accurate, consistent, and vibrant colors with 178° wide viewing angles, which prevent gamma/saturation shifts and make the image perfect regardless of the angle you’re looking at the screen.

It covers 92% of the DCI-P3 color space, which is equivalent to ~120% sRGB. As a result, you get more lifelike and saturated colors.

If you prefer more accurate color output for sRGB content, you can use the sRGB mode to clamp the gamut to ~100%. Note that you can also adjust the brightness in this mode.

Other panel-related specifications include a 1,000:1 static contrast ratio, which is expected from an IPS panel monitor, and a 350-nit peak brightness resulting in a more than bright enough picture under normal lighting conditions.

The Gigabyte G27Q display also supports HDR (High Dynamic Range) and has VESA’s entry-level DisplayHDR 400 certification.

HDR content gets a boost in peak brightness up to 400-nits and it makes good use of the monitor’s wide color gamut, but due to the limited contrast ratio, you’re not getting the ‘true’ HDR viewing experience, which is only possible on notably more expensive monitors anyway.

1440p resolution is perfect for 27″ sized monitors as you get an ideal pixel-per-inch ratio of 108 PPI, which results in plenty of screen space as well as sharp details and text, without any scaling necessary.

Performance

The Gigabyte G27Q has three response time overdrive modes: Picture Quality, Balance, and Speed.

The ‘Speed’ mode is the fastest and effectively eliminates trailing behind fast-moving objects at 144Hz without adding any prominent overshoot.

If you’re gaming at 60Hz, or using variable refresh rate (VRR) around 60FPS, dial the overdrive back to ‘Balance’ in order to prevent overshoot from becoming too noticeable.

AMD FreeSync is supported with a 48-144Hz dynamic range and LFC (Low Framerate Compensation), thus preventing screen tearing and stuttering up to 144FPS.

While the monitor is not officially certified as ‘G-SYNC Compatible’ by NVIDIA, FreeSync works with compatible GeForce cards (GTX 10-series or newer) over DisplayPort without any issues. With AMD cards, FreeSync works over both DisplayPort and HDMI.

As an alternative to VRR, you can use the Aim Stabilizer technology, which uses backlight strobing at a fixed refresh rate to reduce perceived motion blur. It can’t be active at the same time as FreeSync and it reduces the monitor’s brightness while active.

Note that while Aim Stabilizer can improve motion clarity in fast-paced games, your frame rate should match the monitor’s refresh rate for the best performance and minimal strobe crosstalk (duplicate images).

The Gigabyte G27Q input lag amounts to only ~4ms, which makes for imperceptible delay between your actions and the result on the screen.

Finally, the backlight of the monitor is flicker-free (unless Aim Stabilizer is enabled) and there’s a 10-level low-blue light filter.

Some IPS glow is noticeable as expected from an IPS panel monitor, but keep in mind that the amount of IPS glow varies across different units of monitors.

Features

Gigabyte G27Q OSD Sidekick

At the rear of the monitor, you’ll find a 5-way directional joystick for easy navigation through the OSD (On-Screen Display) menu.

You can also download and use the OSD SideKick desktop application and make all your adjustments there via your mouse/keyboard.

Noteworthy features include Black Equalizer (improves visibility in dark scenes), custom crosshair overlays, a refresh rate tracker, on-screen timers, and various pre-calibrated picture modes (FPS, RTS/RPG, Reader, and three customizable profiles).

The G27Q also supports Gigabyte’s Dashboard feature, which allows you track your PC’s system performance (CPU/GPU temperature, utilization, fan speed, etc.) on the screen as long as you’ve connected them via USB.

Besides the standard brightness, contrast, and color temperature adjustments, you’ll also find advanced settings, such as gamma presets, sharpness, and saturation (Color Vibrance).

Design & Connectivity

Gigabyte G27Q Monitor Back

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and even offers height adjustment up to 130mm, which is great to see at this price range.

You can also tilt the screen by -5°/20° or mount it via the 100x100mm VESA pattern.

The screen has a 3-side borderless design and a matte screen finish with an anti-glare coating that eliminates reflections, but doesn’t make the picture appear too grainy.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.2, two HDMI 2.0 ports, a dual-USB 3.0 hub (1 upstream + 2 downstream), a headphones jack, and dual 2W integrated speakers.

The DisplayPort 1.2 input has added HDR support (DP 1.2 + HDR), but if you want to use the monitor with 10-bit color depth, you’ll need to lower the refresh rate to 120Hz.

Since most games only support 8-bit color and there’s no noticeable difference between 8-bit and 10-bit color in most games (or between 120Hz and 144Hz for that matter), this isn’t a big issue and is, in fact, common among 1440p 144Hz+ displays.

Price & Similar Monitors

The Gigabyte G27Q goes for ~$320, which is an excellent price for a 1440p 144Hz IPS gaming monitor.

Due to its fast response time speed, wide color gamut with an sRGB mode, and height-adjustable stand, the G27Q is our new top-recommended budget 1440p 144Hz IPS monitor.

At this price range, you may also want to consider the cheaper Gigabyte G27QC with a curved VA panel display.

It has a higher contrast ratio for deeper blacks, but it doesn’t have as fast response time or smooth VRR performance, resulting in noticeable dark smearing and even brightness flickering (depending on the unit).

You might also be interested in the Gigabyte M27Q. It has a bit faster response time speed, a built-in KVM switch, and a higher 170Hz overclockable refresh rate, but it’s more expensive and has a BGR subpixel layout.

So, if you want something faster, we recommend the LG 27GL83A instead.

Visit our comprehensive gaming monitor buyer’s guide for more information and the best deals available (always up-to-date).

Conclusion

The Gigabyte G27Q is a great budget 1440p 144Hz monitor for gaming, everyday use, and even entry-level color-critical work within the sRGB color space.

Its fast response time and FreeSync support ensure smooth performance, while the wide color gamut and high resolution make for an immersive viewing experience.

Specifications

Screen Size27-inch
Resolution2560×1440 (QHD)
Panel TypeIPS
Aspect Ratio16:9 (Widescreen)
Refresh Rate144Hz
Response Time (GtG)Not specified
Response Time (Aim Stabilizer)1ms (MPRT)
Adaptive-SyncFreeSync (48-144Hz)
Speakers2x2W
PortsDisplayPort 1.2, 2x HDMI 2.0
Other PortsHeadphone Jack, 2x USB 3.0
Brightness350 cd/m²
Brightness (HDR)400 cd/m²
Contrast Ratio1000:1 (static)
Colors1.07 billion (8-bit + FRC)
92% DCI-P3
HDRDisplayHDR 400
VESAYes (100x100mm)

The Pros:

  • Accurate and vibrant colors
  • Quick response time speed
  • Plenty of features including FreeSync and MBR up to 144Hz
  • Height-adjustable stand, USB hub

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and inferior contrast ratio to VA panels (as expected from this panel technology)
  • Design lacks swivel and pivot adjustments

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Rob Shafer
Rob Shafer

Rob is a software engineer with a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver. He now works full-time managing DisplayNinja while coding his own projects on the side.