The Best Gaming Monitors (Editor’s Picks For 2022)

Check out the best gaming monitors currently available. We've narrowed down your selection to only our top-recommended models!

Nowadays, choosing a gaming monitor that’s most suited for you can be overwhelming due to the sheer amount and variety of available models.

That’s why we made this buyer’s guide! Here, you’ll only find our favorite monitors for gaming – sorted by budget!

MonitorSizeResolutionPanelRefresh
Rate
VRR 
24”1920x1080IPS144HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC Compatible)
27”2560x1440IPS165HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC Stable)
24”1920x1080IPS240HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC Stable)
34”3440x1440IPS165HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC Stable)
27”2560x1440IPS240HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC Stable)
28”3840x2160IPS144HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC Compatible)
32”3840x2160IPS144HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC Stable)
43”3840x2160VA144HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC Unstable)
34”3440x1440IPS160HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC Compatible)
48"3840x2160OLED120HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC Compatible)
42"3840x2160OLED138HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC Compatible)
34”3440x1440QD-OLED175HzG-SYNC Ultimate
+ FreeSync
32"3840x2160VA165HzFreeSync
(G-SYNC Stable)
*Recommended monitor - a review section will be added soon
budget pick

AOC 24G2

AOC 24G2
  • Vibrant colors
  • FreeSync up to 144Hz
  • Affordable
best value

MSI G273QPF

MSI G273QPF
  • Vibrant colors
  • FreeSync up to 165Hz
  • High pixel density
best overall

Dell AW3423DW

Dell Alienware AW3423DW Monitor
  • Vibrant colors
  • VRR up to 175Hz
  • Infinite contrast, instantaneous response times

Now, while we already have a comprehensive best gaming buyer’s guide with over 25 recommended models, this guide is more compact with a focus on the best value for money models that are highly regarded and have proven to be reliable.

So, you can just pick according to your budget and preferences with ease of mind.

Of course, we’ll also explain exactly why we picked these models and how they compare to their alternatives in the review summaries below; here’s the sum-up by budget:

The Pros:

  • Vibrant and accurate colors
  • Fully ergonomic design
  • Plenty of gaming features including FreeSync and MBR up to 144Hz

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The AOC 24G2 is the best budget gaming monitor you can get for under $200.

Image Quality

If you’re interested in buying a monitor for gaming, the AOC 24G2 is the cheapest model you should consider. It’s only $20 – $40 more expensive than the budget ~22″ – 24″ models with 60/75Hz, so it’s really worth the investment for 144Hz.

The monitor is based on an IPS panel by Panda, which boasts a strong 350-nit peak brightness and a static contrast ratio of ~1,500:1 (surpassing the specified 250-nits and 1,000:1 values), resulting in a bright image with decent blacks for an IPS display.

Further, the AOC 24G2 is the only 24″ 1080p 144Hz IPS monitor with a wide color gamut thanks to its custom backlight. It covers ~90% of the DCI-P3 color space (~125% sRGB gamut size) for more saturated and rich colors.

This results in some over-saturation when viewing regular sRGB content, but it’s rather minor, so most users will prefer the extra vibrancy. There is a Delta E < 2 factory-calibrated sRGB emulation mode that restricts the color gamut to ~100% sRGB, but it locks brightness to a very high setting (90/100).

So, to get rid of oversaturation and locked brightness, you’ll have to use a software gamut clamp in AMD drivers or via a third-party tool if you have an NVIDIA GPU.

The 1080p Full HD resolution results in a decent pixel density of roughly 92 PPI (pixels per inch) on the 24″ screen of the AOC 24G2, which means you’ll get a fair amount of screen space and reasonably crisp details and text.

On the 27″ 1080p model, you get a considerably lower pixel density, resulting in more pixelated details and less screen real estate, which is why recommend the 24″ model.

Also, the 1080p resolution will allow you to take advantage of 144Hz even with budget gaming rigs as it’s not very demanding on the GPU.

Features

Moving on, the AOC 24G2 has a fast pixel response time speed, so there’s no prominent ghosting behind fast-moving objects, making for a smooth and responsive gaming experience.

At a high refresh rate, stick with the ‘Strong’ response time overdrive mode, while at lower refresh rates, ‘Medium’ is the way to go.

Variable refresh rate (VRR) is supported with both FreeSync Premium and G-SYNC Compatible certifications for smooth and tear-free gameplay up to 144FPS.

Alternatively, you can use MBR (Motion Blur Reduction), which uses backlight strobing to reduce perceived motion blur at a cost of picture brightness.

Other useful features include AOC Shadow Control for better visibility in dark scenes, Game Color for adjusting color saturation and various picture presets.

Check out our AOC 24G2 review for more information.

We also recommend the AOC 24G2 as the best budget 1080p 120Hz monitor for the PS5 and the Xbox consoles.

Design & Connectivity

AOC 24G2 Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is robust and versatile, which is surprising considering the price! You get full ergonomic support with up to 130mm height adjustment, 90° pivot, +/- 30° swivel, -5°/22° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 1.4 ports, one DisplayPort 1.2 input, VGA and a headphone jack. FreeSync is supported up to 144Hz over both HDMI and DP.

Alternatives

In case the AOC 24G2 is not available, check out the updated AOC 24G2SP model with similar specs, including a slight 165Hz factory overclock.

The LG 24GN650/600 and the HP x24i/h are great models as well, though they don’t have as wide color gamut.

The Pros:

  • Vibrant and accurate colors
  • Fully ergonomic design
  • Plenty of gaming features including FreeSync and MBR up to 165Hz
  • High pixel density

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

If your budget is around $300, the MSI G273QPF is our top recommendation for mixed-use, including productivity work, gaming and basic content creation.

Image Quality

The next step from the AOC 24G2 is a 27″ 1440p high refresh rate gaming monitor and we find that the MSI G273QPF offers the best value for money here.

You get a bigger screen with a higher resolution to back it up. With a pixel density of roughly 108 PPI (pixels per inch), not only do you get more screen space, but details and text are pretty much as sharp as they can be without having to use scaling.

This is why most gamers find this screen size and resolution to be ideal; not to mention that it’s significantly less taxing on your GPU than 4K UHD.

Further, the monitor has a decent peak brightness of 300-nits and a static contrast ratio of 1,000:1, while its 93% DCI-P3 wide color gamut coverage adds extra vibrancy to the image without excessive over-saturation.

Sadly, there’s no sRGB emulation mode, so you’ll have to rely on software clamps in order to limit the gamut to ~100% sRGB.

Features

The MSI G273QPF has a rapid 1ms GtG pixel response time speed for virtually no ghosting in fast-paced games.

It supports a variable refresh rate up to 165Hz for tear-free gameplay and works with both AMD and NVIDIA GPUs without any issues. Motion Blur Reduction is available as well for CRT-like motion clarity at a cost of picture brightness.

Other features include Night Vision (improves visibility in dark scenes), various picture presets, crosshair overlays and on-screen timers.

Visit our MSI G273QF review for more details, it’s the same monitor but with a tilt-only stand. We also recommend the MSI G273QF for the Xbox Series X as it supports the 1440p 120Hz mode.

Design & Connectivity

MSI G273QPF Monitor Design

The design boasts full ergonomic support with up to 130mm height adjustment, +/- 90° pivot, +/- 45° swivel, -5°/20° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.2, two HDMI 2.0 ports and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

There are plenty of 27″ 1440p high refresh rate IPS gaming monitors available at this price range, such as the LG 27GL83A, the HP X27q and the Acer XV272UP, however, we recommend going with the MSI G273QPF.

We don’t recommend going with a VA model as they’re not really cheaper yet suffer from slower response times, which result in black smearing, and many units are affected by VRR brightness flickering.

The Pros:

  • Accurate colors
  • Fully ergonomic design, USB hub
  • Plenty of gaming features including FreeSync and MBR up to 240Hz

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

In case your budget is around $300 and you’re looking for the best monitor for competitive gaming, we recommend the ViewSonic XG2431, but we’ll also include a few alternatives below.

Image Quality

Keep in mind that thanks to its fast response time speed, low input lag and high refresh rate, even the MSI G273QPF can be great for competitive gaming if you can maintain a high frame rate at 1440p.

In fact, some gamers prefer having a higher resolution as it makes all details sharper. However, if you have a weaker system or just want the clearest motion and the lowest input lag you can get, we recommend the XG2431.

To start with, this gaming monitor has a maximum refresh rate of 240Hz, which doesn’t provide quite as a big jump in responsiveness as going from 60Hz to over 120Hz, but you can definitely feel the difference!

In terms of image quality, you’re getting an IPS panel with wide viewing angles and full sRGB gamut coverage for accurate and vivid colors without over-saturation, as well as a decent 350-nit peak brightness and a 1,000:1 contrast ratio.

The 1080p resolution provides you with a respectable pixel density and allows you to easily maintain high frame rates as it’s not very demanding to drive.

Features

The ViewSonic XG2431 monitor supports a variable refresh rate up to 240Hz for tear-free gameplay and has a rapid pixel response time speed for virtually no trailing behind fast-moving objects.

Its main feature, however, is the PureXP Motion Blur Reduction technology with Blur Busters 2.0 certification, ensuring impeccable backlight strobing performance and customization.

Using this monitor at 120Hz with strobing and steady 120 frame rate results in truly CRT-like motion clarity with zero motion blur or other unwelcome visual artifacts.

You can use MBR all the way up to 240Hz for lower input lag, but the image won’t be quite as clear, though you can fine-tune it to your personal liking.

So, the XG2431 provides you with excellent gaming performance regardless of your preferred playing style. You can use it at a fixed 240Hz for minimal input lag, with a variable refresh rate for no tearing, or with MBR for no blur.

Check out our ViewSonic XG2431 review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

ViewSonic XG2431 Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is robust and versatile with up to 120mm height adjustment, +/- 90° swivel, 90° pivot, -5°/15° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports, a headphone jack, two 3W built-in speakers and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

You can also find a 360Hz gaming monitor for around $300 – 400$. We recommend the Acer Aopen 25XV2QF with 390Hz OC and MBR support.

Its higher refresh rate provides you with lower input lag, provided you can achieve 390FPS, but its backlight strobing is not as well-implemented as that of the XG2431. Also, note that the difference between 360Hz and 240Hz is less noticeable than 240Hz vs 144Hz.

Another interesting display for competitive gaming for around $300 is the MSI MAG301RF with a 30″ 2560×1080 ultrawide IPS panel, VRR, MBR, 200Hz and 1ms GtG response time speed. However, consider it only if your favorite competitive titles support the 21:9 format natively!

The Pros:

  • Accurate colors
  • Ergonomic design
  • Plenty of gaming features including FreeSync and MBR up to 165Hz
  • High pixel density

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

The HP X34 is the best value monitor you can get for $400. It’s a 34″ 3440×1440 165Hz flat-screen ultrawide monitor with an IPS panel!

Image Quality

A 34″ 3440×1440 ultrawide monitor is essentially a 27″ 1440p monitor that’s ~33% wider, providing you with extra horizontal screen space, which is great for productivity work and audio/video editing. Additionally, compatible games and videos are more immersive due to the extended field of view.

On top of that, the HP X34 has an IPS panel with wide viewing angles, vibrant colors (115% sRGB gamut size) and a fast response time speed for minimum ghosting.

It also has a strong peak brightness of 400-nits and a static contrast ratio of 1,000:1, as expected from an IPS display.

Features

Variable refresh rate is supported with a 60-165Hz dynamic range, while other useful gaming features include MBR and Black Stretch (improves visibility in dark scenes).

Check out our full HP X34 review for more details.

Design & Connectivity

HP X34 Monitor Design

The HP X34 has a stand with height adjustment up to 100mm, tilt by -5°/20° and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, HDMI 2.0 and a headphone jack.

Alternatives

The HP X34 price ranges from ~$370 to over $500, but we don’t recommend buying it for over $450. At that price range, you should get the Gigabyte M34WQ instead since it has similar specifications, but with a wider color gamut, additional features and more extensive connectivity options.

Another ultrawide monitor worth considering at this price range is the Gigabyte G34WQC-A.

It has a curved VA panel with a higher contrast ratio for deeper blacks, but it suffers from smearing behind fast-moving objects in dark scenes and some units are affected by VRR brightness flickering – so consider it only if you’re not sensitive to these visual artifacts!

The Pros:

  • Vibrant and accurate colors
  • Ergonomic design, USB hub, KVM
  • Plenty of gaming features including FreeSync and MBR up to 240Hz
  • High pixel density

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

If your budget is $500 and you’re not interested in ultrawide displays, the Gigabyte M27Q-X offers amazing value for the price.

Image Quality

Just like the $300 MSI G273QPF, the M27Q-X is a 27″ 1440p IPS gaming monitor with a wide color gamut and a fast response time speed, but it has a higher 240Hz refresh rate!

So, if you cannot get above 165FPS in competitive titles or you mostly play games in which that’s unfeasible, the 165Hz MSI G273QPF will suit you better for less money, that is, unless you plan on upgrading your rig.

The M27Q-X has another advantage, which is the wider coverage of the Adobe RGB color space (97%), resulting in more saturated colors, especially when it comes to green and blue colors. An sRGB emulation mode is available in case you prefer more natural and accurate colors.

Other panel-related specifications include a 400-nit peak brightness and a 1,000:1 static contrast ratio.

Features

Variable refresh rate is supported with a 48-240Hz dynamic range, and the monitor supports Gigabyte’s Aim Stabilizer Sync technology, which allows you to use VRR and MBR at the same time.

You also get the standard set of gaming features, such as Black Equalizer, crosshair overlays, on-screen timers, various picture presets, etc. Picture in Picture and Picture by Picture is available as well.

Check out our M27Q-X review for more information.

Design & Connectivity

Gigabyte M27Q X Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor offers height adjustment up to 130mm, tilt by -5°/20° and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include two HDMI 2.0 ports, DisplayPort 1.4, USB-C (DP 1.4 Alt Mode, 18W Power Delivery), a dual-USB 3.0 hub, a headphone jack, two 2W built-in speakers and an integrated KVM switch.

Alternatives

Another 1440p 240Hz monitor worth considering is the Samsung Odyssey G7, available in both 27″ and 32″ variants for ~$600 and $700, respectively.

They feature a VA panel with a higher contrast ratio and a bit better HDR image quality, but their variable refresh rate performance is not as smooth since it can cause some micro-stuttering. They also have an aggressive 1000R screen curvature, which some users don’t like.

The Pros:

  • Vibrant and accurate colors
  • Fully ergonomic design, USB hub, KVM, USB-C with 65W PD
  • Plenty of gaming features including FreeSync and MBR up to 144Hz
  • Very high pixel density

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

In case you prefer visual fidelity over moderate performance gain, 4K 144Hz might suit you better than 1440p 240Hz – and the Acer XV283K KV offers by far the best value for money in this category.

Image Quality

The 4K UHD resolution results in a high pixel density of 157 PPI on the 28″ viewable screen of the Acer XB283K. In comparison to 108 PPI of 27″ 1440p displays, you get significantly sharper details and text, as well as more screen real estate.

However, you will also need to apply scaling in order to make small text readable; this will reduce the amount of screen space, but further increase detail clarity.

1080p monitor vs 4K (Scaling)

Now, keep in mind that the difference between 1440p and 4K on a ~27″ sized monitor is not actually that noticeable in games and videos at a normal viewing distance.

Since 4K UHD is significantly more demanding than 1440p, the difference is performance will be a lot more obvious, which is why we usually recommend at least 32″ 4K monitors for gaming.

If, however, you plan on using the monitor for other use too, be it photo/video editing, coding/programming, productivity work, etc., then the Acer XB283K KV makes more sense – you get sharper text and more details for your work as well as an excellent gaming experience, provided you got a powerful enough gaming rig.

Moving on, the Acer XB283KKV has an IPS panel with a wide 90% DCI-P3 gamut coverage (with an sRGB mode available), excellent Delta E < 1 factory calibration, a 400-nit peak brightness, a 1,000:1 contrast ratio and a rapid 1ms GtG response time speed.

Features

It supports a variable refresh rate with certified G-SYNC compatibility for smooth tear-free gameplay up to 144FPS, as well as backlight strobing via its Visual Response Boost technology.

You’ll also find plenty of additional features, including built-in light and color temperature sensors, Black Boost (improves visibility in dark scenes), crosshair overlays, various picture presets, etc.

Check out our full Acer XB283K KV review for more details.

The Acer XB283K KV is also a great monitor for the Xbox Series X and the PS5.

Design & Connectivity

Acer Predator XB283K KVbmiipruzx Review

The stand of the monitor is robust and versatile with up to 115mm height adjustment, 90° pivot, -5°/20° tilt, +/- 20° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports, a USB-C port (DP Alt Mode, 65W PD), a quad-USB 3.0 hub, a headphone jack, two 2W integrated speakers and built-in KVM functionality.

Alternatives

The Gigabyte M28U offers similar performance and can sometimes be found for as low as $500. It doesn’t have USB-C PD or quite as good overdrive.

Another popular ~27″ 4K 144Hz gaming monitor is the LG 27GP950. While it does offer a bit better HDR image quality, it goes for ~$900 and we find that the subtle HDR improvement isn’t worth the price difference.

The Pros:

  • Vibrant and accurate colors
  • Ergonomic design, USB hub, KVM
  • Plenty of gaming features including FreeSync and MBR up to 144Hz
  • Very high pixel density

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)

About The Monitor

If you’d like a bigger 4K 144Hz gaming monitor, we recommend the Gigabyte M32U, which can be found for as low as $730.

Image Quality

Most users find that 4K UHD resolution better suits 32″ screens than 27″ sized displays as you still get a very high pixel density (140 PPI in this case) but without having to rely on scaling as much.

Additionally, while 1440p looks great on 27″ monitors, 32″ 1440p displays have the same pixel density as 24″ 1080p screens, so 4K UHD is a much better choice here.

The Gigabyte M32U is based on an IPS panel with strong 400-nit peak brightness, a 1,000:1 contrast ratio, a wide 90% DCI-P3 color gamut (sRGB mode available) and a fast 1ms GtG pixel response time speed.

Features

Variable refresh rate is supported with a 48-144Hz dynamic range for tear-free gameplay. The monitor also boasts Aim Stabilizer Sync, which allows VRR and MBR to work at the same time.

Other features include Black Equalizer, various picture presets, crosshair overlays and Picture in Picture/Picture by Picture support.

Check out our full M32U review for more information. It’s also a great monitor for the Xbox Series X and the PS5.

Design & Connectivity

Gigabyte M32U Monitor Design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers height adjustment up to 130mm, tilt by -5°/20°, +/- 30° swivel and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports, a USB-C port (DP Alt Mode, 18W PD), a USB 3.0 hub (3 downstream + 1 upstream), a headphone jack, two 3W built-in speakers and a KVM switch.

Alternatives

The MSI MPG321UR-QD has a bit better HDR image quality and full Adobe RGB gamut coverage, however, we find that it’s not worth the $200 extra unless you need the Adobe RGB color space for work.

The Pros:

  • Vibrant colors, high contrast ratio and strong peak brightness
  • Rich connectivity options including a USB hub and KVM switch
  • Plenty of gaming features including FreeSync and MBR up to 144Hz

The Cons:

  • Minor smearing in fast-paced games, mainly in darker scenes
  • Some units affected by VRR brightness flickering
  • BGR subpixel layout

About The Monitor

Want an even larger 4K 144Hz gaming monitor? The Gigabyte Aorus FV43U is an excellent choice if you can find it at a good price!

Image Quality

4K UHD resolution looks great even on 43″ sized screens with a pixel density of 104 PPI, making individual pixels virtually indistinguishable at a normal viewing distance.

However, just like all 43″ screens, the FV43U has a BGR subpixel layout, so small text will have some fringing artifacts, but this isn’t noticeable in games and videos.

On the plus side, its high 4,000:1 native contrast ratio, stellar 750-nit typical brightness (1,000-nits peak for HDR content) and wide 99% Adobe RGB color gamut (sRGB mode available) deliver an outstanding image quality.

HDR content also gets a meaningful improvement in image quality, but since there are only 8 dimming zones, it’s not the true HDR viewing experience. Still, most scenes will look significantly better than SDR.

Features

While the VA panel of the FV43U provides you with deep blacks, it also has a few downsides, including narrower viewing angles with gamma/contrast shifts.

Some smearing is noticeable behind fast-moving objects in dark scenes, but unless you’re a highly competitive player, it most likely won’t bother you.

Further, when using variable refresh rate, some units of the monitor exhibit brightness flickering with fluctuating frame rates. Since screen tearing is not that noticeable at 144Hz (at least in comparison to 60Hz), you can just disable variable refresh rate in games where brightness flickering is visible.

VRR is otherwise supported with a 48-144Hz range and there’s the optimal Aim Stabilizer Sync technology for simultaneous VRR and MBR performance.

Other useful features include PiP/PbP, Black Equalizer, various picture presets and crosshair overlays.

Check out our full Gigabyte FV43U review for more information. We also recommend it for the PS5 and the Xbox Series X.

Design & Connectivity

Gigabyte Aorus FV43U Monitor Design

The monitor’s stand is sturdy but has no ergonomic adjustments apart from the 200x200mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4 with DSC, two HDMI 2.1 ports, USB-C (DP Alt Mode, 18W PD), two 12W integrated speakers, a headphone jack, an audio line-out port, a dual-USB 3.0 hub and a built-in KVM switch.

Alternatives

Now, the FV43U price ranges from $700 to $1,100. It’s definitely worth the money if you can find it for around $700 – $800. However, above that, you should consider an OLED display instead, such as the LG OLED48C1 TV, which can be found for ~$1,000 – we’ll get into it later on in the article.

The Pros:

  • Vibrant and accurate colors
  • Ergonomic design, USB hub
  • Plenty of gaming features including FreeSync up to 160Hz
  • High pixel density

The Cons:

  • IPS glow and mediocre contrast ratio (as expected from this panel technology)
  • Expensive

About The Monitor

The LG 34GP83A is a 34″ 3440×1440 144Hz 1ms IPS gaming monitor that goes for $800, so it doesn’t offer quite as good value for the price as the other models we’ve included in this guide, but it’s still worth considering – and here’s why.

Image Quality

As we’ve already mentioned, the HP X34 is a 34″ 3440×1440 high refresh rate IPS gaming monitor that can be found for $400, whereas the Gigabyte M34WQ with a wide color gamut goes for $450 – $500. So, what makes the 34GP83A worth $800?

To start with, the LG 34GP83A has an even wider color gamut than the Gigabyte M34WQ with 98% DCI-P3 gamut coverage (sRGB mode available too).

Further, it has a bit faster response time speed for less ghosting in fast-paced games.

Lastly, unlike the X34 and the M34WQ, LG’s ultrawide monitor has a 1900R curved panel for added immersion.

Other panel-related specifications are the same, including a 400-nit peak brightness and a 1,000:1 static contrast ratio.

For most people, these three advantages of the 34GP83A won’t be worth the extra $300 – $400. However, if you want a good ultrawide gaming monitor at this price range, it’s your best option, though we recommend saving up to $1,300 for the Dell Alienware AW3423DW instead.

Features

The LG 34GP83A is overclockable to 160Hz and it supports variable refresh rate for tear-free gameplay up to 160FPS.

Other features include Black Stabilizer, various picture presets and crosshair overlays.

Design & Connectivity

lg 34gp83a monitor design

The stand of the monitor is sturdy and offers height adjustment up to 110mm, -5°/15° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports (limited to 85Hz), a headphone jack and a dual-USB 3.0 hub.

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio, wide color gamut, decent brightness
  • Instantaneous response time
  • Plenty of additional features including VRR and MBR up to 120Hz

The Cons:

  • Stand not adjustable
  • Risk of permanent burn-in and temporary image retention
  • Too big for regular desktop use for most users

About The Display

The LG OLED48C1 TV can be found for $800 – $1000, making it the best value gaming display in this price range.

Image Quality

OLED displays don’t need a backlight to create an image; instead, each pixel emits its own light. As a result, you get an infinite contrast ratio with true blacks and no backlight bleeding, glowing, or other visual artifacts.

Additionally, the LG 48C1 has a 98% DCI-P3 wide color gamut, 178° wide viewing angles and true 10-bit color depth for smooth gradients.

Another advantage of OLEDs is the instantaneous pixel response time speed, resulting in no visible trailing behind fast-moving objects.

The main disadvantage, however, is brightness as OLED displays cannot get as bright as high-end LED-backlit LCDs.

Still, the LG C1 can reach 800-nits for small highlights (10% window), which along with its wide color gamut and infinite contrast ratio provides you with the best HDR viewing experience at this price range – far better than that of any equally priced LED LCD.

A 100% full white window is limited to around 140-nits, which some users might find acceptable, but it’s generally too dim for rooms with strong ambient lighting.

 100% White Window Max Brightness (SDR)100% White Window Max Brightness (HDR)10% White Window Max Brightness (HDR)1 - 3% White Window Max Brightness (HDR)
ASUS PG42UQ200-nits**120-nits800-nits800-nits
LG OLED42C2180-nits*120-nits700-nits700-nits
LG OLED48C1120-nits120-nits800-nits800-nits
Gigabyte FO48U110-nits110-nits500-nits600-nits
ASUS PG48UQNot TestedNot TestedNot TestedNot Tested
LG 48GQ900Not TestedNot TestedNot TestedNot Tested
LG OLED48C2Not TestedNot TestedNot TestedNot Tested
Dell AW3423DW250-nits250-nits600-nits1000-nits

*PC Mode, Game Optimizer enabled
**Uniform Brightness enabled

Further, OLED displays have a risk of permanent image burn-in if bright static elements are left on the screen for too long. However, as long as you’re mindful about how you use the display and take advantage of the integrated burn-in prevention features, this won’t be an issue.

Most people will find the 48″ sized screen too big for regular desktop use, though it’s manageable if you sit a bit further from it and mainly use it for games and videos. You get a decent pixel density of 92 PPI (pixels per inch), which is equal to that of 24″ 1080p displays.

Moving on, the LG OLED48C1 offers plenty of useful features, including variable refresh rate (40-120Hz range), Motion Blur Reduction and WebOS 6.0.

Check out our full review for more information. Obviously, besides PC gaming, the C1 is great for the PS5 and Xbox consoles too.

Design & Connectivity

LG OLED48C1 TV Design

The stand of the TV is sturdy and supports 300x200mm VESA mount compatibility. It has a glossy screen surface for more vivid image quality, but it’s also reflective, so you’ll have to keep in mind the lighting in your room.

Connectivity options include four HDMI 2.1 ports, RJ45, tuner, composite-in, both analog and digital audio jacks, three USB 2.0 ports, WiFi and Bluetooth.

Alternatives

The C2 series include a 42″ sized model and there’s the ASUS PG42UQ, which are more suited for desktop use, but they’re also more expensive (~$1,400). For that price, we recommend the Dell AW3423DW instead unless you don’t mind the huge 42″ screen.

Gigabyte offers a 48″ monitor based on the same OLED panel, the Aorus FO48U, with the included DisplayPort input, however, it’s more expensive yet offers fewer features and lower brightness.

The Pros:

  • Infinite contrast ratio, wide color gamut, high brightness
  • Instantaneous response time
  • Plenty of additional features including VRR up to 175Hz
  • High pixel density

The Cons:

  • Risk of permanent burn-in and temporary image retention

About The Monitor

In case you want to invest over $1,000 for a gaming monitor, you won’t find anything better than the Dell Alienware AW3423DW. At $,1300, it’s even better than some $3,000 monitors, resulting in an exceptional value for money.

Image Quality

The Dell AW3423DW uses Samsung’s QD-OLED panel, which greatly improves upon LG’s OLED panel mentioned above.

First of all, you get even wider viewing angles and higher peak brightness. Not only can the AW3423DW reach 1,000-nits for small highlights, but it can also sustain ~250-nits for a 100% white window, making it more suited for desktop use.

It also has a wider 99.3% color gamut (with sRGB mode available), which results in more saturated colors as well as higher perceived brightness.

Just like any OLED display, it has instantaneous response time speed and an infinite contrast ratio.

Further, the AW3423DW has a higher 175Hz refresh rate and a dedicated G-SYNC module for smooth variable refresh rate performance. You’ll also find other standard gaming features, such as crosshair overlays and Dark Stabilizer.

Next, the 34″ 3440×1440 ultrawide panel provides you with a higher pixel density of 110 PPI, resulting in sharper text and more screen space as well as a reasonable screen size for any setup. It’s not a good option for consoles though as they lack native ultrawide support.

Lastly, QD-OLED panels are more resistant to burn-in. Dell even offers a 3-year warranty that covers burn-in for the AW3423DW.

Note that QD-OLED panels use a triangular RGB subpixel layout, which can cause minor fringing on small text, but most users won’t be bothered by this.

Be sure to check out our full Dell AW3423DW review for more details.

Design & Connectivity

Dell Alienware AW3423DW Review

The stand of the monitor is robust and versatile with up to 110mm height adjustment, +/- 20° swivel, -5°/21° tilt and 100x100mm VESA mount compatibility.

The screen has a semi-glossy finish, which raises blacks under direct lighting, so it’s best to use in a dark room (true for any OLED).

Connectivity options include DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports, a headphone jack, line-out and a quad-USB 3.0 hub.

Alternatives

If you’re really worried about burn-in or don’t like the AW3423DW for any reason, the Dell AW3821DW with an IPS panel is a decent ultrawide alternative at this price range.

In case you’d like something in the super-ultrawide format, check out the Samsung Odyssey G9. Keep in mind that these two displays don’t offer nearly as good HDR image quality as the AW3423DW.

For HDR, there are the ViewSonic XG321UG, Samsung Odyssey Neo G9 and the ASUS PG32UQX with higher brightness and no risk of burn-in, but they cost up to $3,000 and have other flaws, such as significantly slower response time speed and blooming artifacts caused by local dimming.

Upcoming IPS mini LED displays, such as the Acer X32 FP will be more affordable (up to $1,800), but still more expensive than the AW3423DW, and with the same LED and local dimming downsides.

The Samsung Neo G7 is the best alternative if you don’t mind its aggressive 1000R curvature.

Conclusion

These are the best gaming monitors we recommend!

If you’re on a tight budget, you can’t go wrong with the AOC 24G2. However, if you have a bit better PC or an Xbox console, you should invest in the MSI G273QPF.

For competitive PC gaming, both the ViewSonic XG2431 and the Gigabyte M27Q-X offer exceptional performance, whereas the HP X34 is great for casual gaming and mixed-use.

In case you want a 4K UHD monitor for PC/console gaming or a good balance between work and play, the Acer XB283K KV and the Gigabyte M32U are definitely the best in terms of value for money, while the Gigabyte FV43U is more suited for console gaming and general content consumption.

Finally, for the best HDR viewing experience, both the LG OLED48C1 and the Dell AW3423DW are great picks, depending on your preference.

Related Reads

Best Curved Monitors
The Best Curved Monitors (2022 Reviews)
Rob Shafer

Rob is a software engineer with a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver. He now works full-time managing DisplayNinja while coding his own projects on the side.